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Wireless Monitoring of Changes in Crew Relations during Long-Duration Mission Simulation.

Johannes B, Sitev AS, Vinokhodova AG, Salnitski VP, Savchenko EG, Artyukhova AE, Bubeev YA, Morukov BV, Tafforin C, Basner M, Dinges DF, Rittweger J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A correspondence of 95.7% with the survey video on day 475 confirmed external reliability.Correlation analyses of a sociometric questionnaire (r = .35-.55, p< .05) and an ethological group approach (r = .45-.66, p < 05) provided initial evidence of the method's validity as a measure of cohesion when taking behavioral and activity patterns into account (e.g. only including activity phases in the afternoon).This confirms our assumption that the registered amount of time spent together during free time is associated with the intensity of personal relationships.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Space Physiology, Institute of Aerospace Medicine, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Group structure and cohesion along with their changes over time play an important role in the success of missions where crew members spend prolonged periods of time under conditions of isolation and confinement. Therefore, an objective system for unobtrusive monitoring of crew cohesion and possible individual stress reactions is of high interest. For this purpose, an experimental wireless group structure (WLGS) monitoring system integrated into a mobile psychophysiological system was developed. In the presented study the WLGS module was evaluated separately in six male subjects (27-38 years old) participating in a 520-day simulated mission to Mars. Two days per week, each crew member wore a small sensor that registered the presence and distance of the sensors either worn by the other subjects or strategically placed throughout the isolation facility. The registration between two sensors was on average 91.0% in accordance. A correspondence of 95.7% with the survey video on day 475 confirmed external reliability. An integrated score of the "crew relation time index" was calculated and analyzed over time. Correlation analyses of a sociometric questionnaire (r = .35-.55, p< .05) and an ethological group approach (r = .45-.66, p < 05) provided initial evidence of the method's validity as a measure of cohesion when taking behavioral and activity patterns into account (e.g. only including activity phases in the afternoon). This confirms our assumption that the registered amount of time spent together during free time is associated with the intensity of personal relationships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

WLGS hardware.Wireless Group Structure (WLGS) system, base station with 12 sensors on top.
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pone.0134814.g001: WLGS hardware.Wireless Group Structure (WLGS) system, base station with 12 sensors on top.

Mentions: Fig 1 shows the base station for the 12 sensors. The system allows the concurrent use of up to 16 sensors with radio signals transmitted and received over a distance of up to 5 meters. The sensors communicated with each other in 5 second intervals, using a 250 ms window for each sensor to send it’s ID. Transmission of each information package took no more than 100 ms. Shifts of the internal timers of the sensors (< 500 ms per day unused; < 100 ms during measurement) were compensated for by a “base station” that served as a synchronization system and was installed in the medical module EU100 of the isolation chamber. The sensors were synchronized by the base station during the initialization procedure in the morning.


Wireless Monitoring of Changes in Crew Relations during Long-Duration Mission Simulation.

Johannes B, Sitev AS, Vinokhodova AG, Salnitski VP, Savchenko EG, Artyukhova AE, Bubeev YA, Morukov BV, Tafforin C, Basner M, Dinges DF, Rittweger J - PLoS ONE (2015)

WLGS hardware.Wireless Group Structure (WLGS) system, base station with 12 sensors on top.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529101&req=5

pone.0134814.g001: WLGS hardware.Wireless Group Structure (WLGS) system, base station with 12 sensors on top.
Mentions: Fig 1 shows the base station for the 12 sensors. The system allows the concurrent use of up to 16 sensors with radio signals transmitted and received over a distance of up to 5 meters. The sensors communicated with each other in 5 second intervals, using a 250 ms window for each sensor to send it’s ID. Transmission of each information package took no more than 100 ms. Shifts of the internal timers of the sensors (< 500 ms per day unused; < 100 ms during measurement) were compensated for by a “base station” that served as a synchronization system and was installed in the medical module EU100 of the isolation chamber. The sensors were synchronized by the base station during the initialization procedure in the morning.

Bottom Line: A correspondence of 95.7% with the survey video on day 475 confirmed external reliability.Correlation analyses of a sociometric questionnaire (r = .35-.55, p< .05) and an ethological group approach (r = .45-.66, p < 05) provided initial evidence of the method's validity as a measure of cohesion when taking behavioral and activity patterns into account (e.g. only including activity phases in the afternoon).This confirms our assumption that the registered amount of time spent together during free time is associated with the intensity of personal relationships.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Space Physiology, Institute of Aerospace Medicine, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Cologne, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Group structure and cohesion along with their changes over time play an important role in the success of missions where crew members spend prolonged periods of time under conditions of isolation and confinement. Therefore, an objective system for unobtrusive monitoring of crew cohesion and possible individual stress reactions is of high interest. For this purpose, an experimental wireless group structure (WLGS) monitoring system integrated into a mobile psychophysiological system was developed. In the presented study the WLGS module was evaluated separately in six male subjects (27-38 years old) participating in a 520-day simulated mission to Mars. Two days per week, each crew member wore a small sensor that registered the presence and distance of the sensors either worn by the other subjects or strategically placed throughout the isolation facility. The registration between two sensors was on average 91.0% in accordance. A correspondence of 95.7% with the survey video on day 475 confirmed external reliability. An integrated score of the "crew relation time index" was calculated and analyzed over time. Correlation analyses of a sociometric questionnaire (r = .35-.55, p< .05) and an ethological group approach (r = .45-.66, p < 05) provided initial evidence of the method's validity as a measure of cohesion when taking behavioral and activity patterns into account (e.g. only including activity phases in the afternoon). This confirms our assumption that the registered amount of time spent together during free time is associated with the intensity of personal relationships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus