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Association between Blood Lead Levels and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

Hwang HS, Lee SB, Jee D - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Digital fundus photographs (45°) were taken of both eyes under physiological mydriasis.All fundus photographs were graded using an international classification and grading system.After adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, total cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, heart problems and strokes, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) in women for any AMD was 1.86 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.03-3.36) and for early AMD was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06-3.48), for those in the highest quintile of lead level compared with the lowest quintile.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the association between blood lead levels and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Methods: A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study included 4,933 subjects aged over 40 years who participated in the 2008-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and for whom fundus photographs were available. All participants underwent a standardized interview, evaluation of blood lead concentration, and a comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Digital fundus photographs (45°) were taken of both eyes under physiological mydriasis. All fundus photographs were graded using an international classification and grading system.

Results: Mean blood lead levels were 3.15 μg/dL in men and 2.27 μg/dL in women (P < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, total cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, heart problems and strokes, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) in women for any AMD was 1.86 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.03-3.36) and for early AMD was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06-3.48), for those in the highest quintile of lead level compared with the lowest quintile. In men, however, blood lead level was not significantly associated with AMD.

Conclusions: Blood lead levels were higher in men, but were only associated with AMD in women. Increased levels of blood lead may be involved in the pathogenesis of AMD development in women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The odds ratio of any AMD by quintile of blood lead level, stratified by gender.
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pone.0134338.g003: The odds ratio of any AMD by quintile of blood lead level, stratified by gender.

Mentions: The association between blood lead levels and any type of AMD is shown in Table 3. In women, the adjusted OR for any AMD after adjusting for potential confounders was 1.86 (95% CI, 1.03–3.36) among those in the highest blood lead quintile compared with those in the lowest quintile (P for trend = 0.164). In men, however, we found no significant association between blood lead quintile and AMD (Fig 3). The adjusted OR for early AMD in women was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06–3.48) among those in the highest quintile compared with those in the lowest quintile, but this was without significant linear trend (P for trend = 0.159), whereas in men there was no significant association (Table 4). Late AMD was not significantly associated with blood lead level in either gender (Table 5). Using a Wald test for coefficient of interaction term to evaluate effect modification, we found a marginally significant interaction between lead level and any AMD by gender (P for interaction = 0.082, Table 6), and between the lead level and late AMD by gender (P for interaction = 0.071, Table 6).


Association between Blood Lead Levels and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

Hwang HS, Lee SB, Jee D - PLoS ONE (2015)

The odds ratio of any AMD by quintile of blood lead level, stratified by gender.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529082&req=5

pone.0134338.g003: The odds ratio of any AMD by quintile of blood lead level, stratified by gender.
Mentions: The association between blood lead levels and any type of AMD is shown in Table 3. In women, the adjusted OR for any AMD after adjusting for potential confounders was 1.86 (95% CI, 1.03–3.36) among those in the highest blood lead quintile compared with those in the lowest quintile (P for trend = 0.164). In men, however, we found no significant association between blood lead quintile and AMD (Fig 3). The adjusted OR for early AMD in women was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06–3.48) among those in the highest quintile compared with those in the lowest quintile, but this was without significant linear trend (P for trend = 0.159), whereas in men there was no significant association (Table 4). Late AMD was not significantly associated with blood lead level in either gender (Table 5). Using a Wald test for coefficient of interaction term to evaluate effect modification, we found a marginally significant interaction between lead level and any AMD by gender (P for interaction = 0.082, Table 6), and between the lead level and late AMD by gender (P for interaction = 0.071, Table 6).

Bottom Line: Digital fundus photographs (45°) were taken of both eyes under physiological mydriasis.All fundus photographs were graded using an international classification and grading system.After adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, total cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, heart problems and strokes, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) in women for any AMD was 1.86 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.03-3.36) and for early AMD was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06-3.48), for those in the highest quintile of lead level compared with the lowest quintile.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the association between blood lead levels and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Methods: A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study included 4,933 subjects aged over 40 years who participated in the 2008-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and for whom fundus photographs were available. All participants underwent a standardized interview, evaluation of blood lead concentration, and a comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Digital fundus photographs (45°) were taken of both eyes under physiological mydriasis. All fundus photographs were graded using an international classification and grading system.

Results: Mean blood lead levels were 3.15 μg/dL in men and 2.27 μg/dL in women (P < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, total cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, heart problems and strokes, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) in women for any AMD was 1.86 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.03-3.36) and for early AMD was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06-3.48), for those in the highest quintile of lead level compared with the lowest quintile. In men, however, blood lead level was not significantly associated with AMD.

Conclusions: Blood lead levels were higher in men, but were only associated with AMD in women. Increased levels of blood lead may be involved in the pathogenesis of AMD development in women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus