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The Effects of Different Training Backgrounds on VO2 Responses to All-Out and Supramaximal Constant-Velocity Running Bouts.

de Aguiar RA, Lisbôa FD, Turnes T, Cruz RS, Caputo F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A mono-exponential function was used to describe the V̇O2 onset kinetics during constant-velocity test at 110%MAV, while during 1-min all-out test the peak of V̇O2 (V̇O2peak), the time to achieve the V̇O2peak (tV̇O2peak) and the V̇O2 decrease at last of the test was determined to characterize the V̇O2 response.During the 1-min all-out test, ENDs presented slower tV̇O2peak than SPRs (40.6 ± 6.8 and 28.8 ± 6.4 s, respectively; p = 0.002) and had a similar V̇O2peak relative to the V̇O2max (88 ± 8 and 83 ± 6%, respectively; p = 0.157).Finally, SPRs was the only group that presented a V̇O2 decrease in the last half of the test (-1.8 ± 2.3 and 3.5 ± 2.3 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively; p < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Research Group, Center for Health and Sport Science, Santa Catarina State University, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
To investigate the impact of different training backgrounds on pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) responses during all-out and supramaximal constant-velocity running exercises, nine sprinters (SPRs) and eight endurance runners (ENDs) performed an incremental test for maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) assessment and two supramaximal running exercises (1-min all-out test and constant-velocity exercise). The V̇O2 responses were continuously determined during the tests (K4b2, Cosmed, Italy). A mono-exponential function was used to describe the V̇O2 onset kinetics during constant-velocity test at 110%MAV, while during 1-min all-out test the peak of V̇O2 (V̇O2peak), the time to achieve the V̇O2peak (tV̇O2peak) and the V̇O2 decrease at last of the test was determined to characterize the V̇O2 response. During constant-velocity exercise, ENDs had a faster V̇O2 kinetics than SPRs (12.7 ± 3.0 vs. 19.3 ± 5.6 s; p < 0.001). During the 1-min all-out test, ENDs presented slower tV̇O2peak than SPRs (40.6 ± 6.8 and 28.8 ± 6.4 s, respectively; p = 0.002) and had a similar V̇O2peak relative to the V̇O2max (88 ± 8 and 83 ± 6%, respectively; p = 0.157). Finally, SPRs was the only group that presented a V̇O2 decrease in the last half of the test (-1.8 ± 2.3 and 3.5 ± 2.3 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively; p < 0.001). In summary, SPRs have a faster V̇O2 response when maximum intensity is required and a high maximum intensity during all-out running exercise seems to lead to a higher decrease in V̇O2 in the last part of the exercise.

No MeSH data available.


Time course of the V̇O2 during the 1 min all-out running test in sprinters and endurance runners.VO2 was expressed in relative (%VO2max) and absolute terms in Fig 1A and 1B, respectively. Statistical analysis was only performed on relative terms. asignificant difference between groups (p < 0.05); a*statistical trend for a higher V̇O2 in sprinters (p = 0.09); bV̇O2 significantly higher than end-exercise V̇O2 in sprinters (p < 0.05).
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pone.0133785.g002: Time course of the V̇O2 during the 1 min all-out running test in sprinters and endurance runners.VO2 was expressed in relative (%VO2max) and absolute terms in Fig 1A and 1B, respectively. Statistical analysis was only performed on relative terms. asignificant difference between groups (p < 0.05); a*statistical trend for a higher V̇O2 in sprinters (p = 0.09); bV̇O2 significantly higher than end-exercise V̇O2 in sprinters (p < 0.05).

Mentions: Fig 2 shows the V̇O2 response during 1 MT. The ANOVA revealed a significant time and interaction effect (p ≤ 0.01). The V̇O2 relative to the V̇O2max was significantly higher in the first V̇O2 points (first and fourth time point, p < 0.05) and was significantly lower in the latest V̇O2 points (from the ninth until the last time point, p < 0.05) in SPRs compared to the ENDs. Furthermore, there was a statistical trend for a higher V̇O2 in the third time point in SPRs (p = 0.09). Finally, the sprinters was the only group in which the last V̇O2 time point was significantly lower than other V̇O2 time point (i.e., sixth, seventh and eighth time point, p < 0.05).


The Effects of Different Training Backgrounds on VO2 Responses to All-Out and Supramaximal Constant-Velocity Running Bouts.

de Aguiar RA, Lisbôa FD, Turnes T, Cruz RS, Caputo F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Time course of the V̇O2 during the 1 min all-out running test in sprinters and endurance runners.VO2 was expressed in relative (%VO2max) and absolute terms in Fig 1A and 1B, respectively. Statistical analysis was only performed on relative terms. asignificant difference between groups (p < 0.05); a*statistical trend for a higher V̇O2 in sprinters (p = 0.09); bV̇O2 significantly higher than end-exercise V̇O2 in sprinters (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529077&req=5

pone.0133785.g002: Time course of the V̇O2 during the 1 min all-out running test in sprinters and endurance runners.VO2 was expressed in relative (%VO2max) and absolute terms in Fig 1A and 1B, respectively. Statistical analysis was only performed on relative terms. asignificant difference between groups (p < 0.05); a*statistical trend for a higher V̇O2 in sprinters (p = 0.09); bV̇O2 significantly higher than end-exercise V̇O2 in sprinters (p < 0.05).
Mentions: Fig 2 shows the V̇O2 response during 1 MT. The ANOVA revealed a significant time and interaction effect (p ≤ 0.01). The V̇O2 relative to the V̇O2max was significantly higher in the first V̇O2 points (first and fourth time point, p < 0.05) and was significantly lower in the latest V̇O2 points (from the ninth until the last time point, p < 0.05) in SPRs compared to the ENDs. Furthermore, there was a statistical trend for a higher V̇O2 in the third time point in SPRs (p = 0.09). Finally, the sprinters was the only group in which the last V̇O2 time point was significantly lower than other V̇O2 time point (i.e., sixth, seventh and eighth time point, p < 0.05).

Bottom Line: A mono-exponential function was used to describe the V̇O2 onset kinetics during constant-velocity test at 110%MAV, while during 1-min all-out test the peak of V̇O2 (V̇O2peak), the time to achieve the V̇O2peak (tV̇O2peak) and the V̇O2 decrease at last of the test was determined to characterize the V̇O2 response.During the 1-min all-out test, ENDs presented slower tV̇O2peak than SPRs (40.6 ± 6.8 and 28.8 ± 6.4 s, respectively; p = 0.002) and had a similar V̇O2peak relative to the V̇O2max (88 ± 8 and 83 ± 6%, respectively; p = 0.157).Finally, SPRs was the only group that presented a V̇O2 decrease in the last half of the test (-1.8 ± 2.3 and 3.5 ± 2.3 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively; p < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Performance Research Group, Center for Health and Sport Science, Santa Catarina State University, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
To investigate the impact of different training backgrounds on pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) responses during all-out and supramaximal constant-velocity running exercises, nine sprinters (SPRs) and eight endurance runners (ENDs) performed an incremental test for maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) assessment and two supramaximal running exercises (1-min all-out test and constant-velocity exercise). The V̇O2 responses were continuously determined during the tests (K4b2, Cosmed, Italy). A mono-exponential function was used to describe the V̇O2 onset kinetics during constant-velocity test at 110%MAV, while during 1-min all-out test the peak of V̇O2 (V̇O2peak), the time to achieve the V̇O2peak (tV̇O2peak) and the V̇O2 decrease at last of the test was determined to characterize the V̇O2 response. During constant-velocity exercise, ENDs had a faster V̇O2 kinetics than SPRs (12.7 ± 3.0 vs. 19.3 ± 5.6 s; p < 0.001). During the 1-min all-out test, ENDs presented slower tV̇O2peak than SPRs (40.6 ± 6.8 and 28.8 ± 6.4 s, respectively; p = 0.002) and had a similar V̇O2peak relative to the V̇O2max (88 ± 8 and 83 ± 6%, respectively; p = 0.157). Finally, SPRs was the only group that presented a V̇O2 decrease in the last half of the test (-1.8 ± 2.3 and 3.5 ± 2.3 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively; p < 0.001). In summary, SPRs have a faster V̇O2 response when maximum intensity is required and a high maximum intensity during all-out running exercise seems to lead to a higher decrease in V̇O2 in the last part of the exercise.

No MeSH data available.