Limits...
Associations between Long-Term Air Pollutant Exposures and Blood Pressure in Elderly Residents of Taipei City: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Chen SY, Wu CF, Lee JH, Hoffmann B, Peters A, Brunekreef B, Chu DC, Chan CC - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Diastolic BP was associated with 1-year exposures to air pollution, with estimates of 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44, 1.03], 0.46 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.63), 0.62 (95% CI: 0.24, 0.99), 0.34 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.50), and 0.65 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.85) mmHg for PM10 (10 μg/m3), PM2.5-10 (5 μg/m3), PM2.5 absorbance (10-5/m), NOx (20 μg/m3), and NO2 (10 μg/m3), respectively.PM2.5 was not associated with diastolic BP, and none of the air pollutants was associated with systolic BP.One-year exposures to PM10, PM2.5-10, PM2.5 absorbance, and NOx were associated with higher diastolic BP in elderly residents of Taipei.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Limited information is available regarding long-term effects of air pollution on blood pressure (BP) and hypertension.

Objective: We studied whether 1-year exposures to particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were correlated with BP and hypertension in the elderly.

Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 27,752 Taipei City residents > 65 years of age who participated in a health examination program in 2009. Land-use regression models were used to estimate participants' 1-year exposures to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), coarse particles (PM2.5-10), fine particles (≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5), PM2.5 absorbance, NOx, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Generalized linear regressions and logistic regressions were used to examine the association between air pollution and BP and hypertension, respectively.

Results: Diastolic BP was associated with 1-year exposures to air pollution, with estimates of 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44, 1.03], 0.46 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.63), 0.62 (95% CI: 0.24, 0.99), 0.34 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.50), and 0.65 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.85) mmHg for PM10 (10 μg/m3), PM2.5-10 (5 μg/m3), PM2.5 absorbance (10-5/m), NOx (20 μg/m3), and NO2 (10 μg/m3), respectively. PM2.5 was not associated with diastolic BP, and none of the air pollutants was associated with systolic BP. Associations of diastolic BP with PM10 and PM2.5 absorbance were stronger among participants with hypertension, diabetes, or a body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 than among participants without these conditions. One-year air pollution exposures were not associated with hypertension.

Conclusions: One-year exposures to PM10, PM2.5-10, PM2.5 absorbance, and NOx were associated with higher diastolic BP in elderly residents of Taipei.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimates (95% CIs) of diastolic blood pressure in association with an increment of 10 μg/m3 for PM10, 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5–10, and 10–5/m for PM2.5 absorbance stratified by hypertensive (physician-diagnosed hypertension or measured unknown hypertension), diabetic (physician-diagnosed diabetes and use of antidiabetic medication or fasting glucose > 126 mg/dL in health examination), or obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) status. The estimates were calculated by generalized linear models, adjusted for sex, age, age mean-centered square, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education, traffic proximity, and individual comorbid conditions other than analyzed stratum.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529013&req=5

f1: Estimates (95% CIs) of diastolic blood pressure in association with an increment of 10 μg/m3 for PM10, 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5–10, and 10–5/m for PM2.5 absorbance stratified by hypertensive (physician-diagnosed hypertension or measured unknown hypertension), diabetic (physician-diagnosed diabetes and use of antidiabetic medication or fasting glucose > 126 mg/dL in health examination), or obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) status. The estimates were calculated by generalized linear models, adjusted for sex, age, age mean-centered square, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education, traffic proximity, and individual comorbid conditions other than analyzed stratum.

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the associations between diastolic BP and PM10, PM2.5–10, and PM2.5 absorbance stratified by an individual’s comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, or obesity. We found 0.95 mmHg (95% CI: 0.50, 1.40), 1.33 mmHg (95% CI: 0.51, 2.15), and 0.99 mmHg (95% CI: 0.50, 1.48) increase in diastolic BP for an increment of 10 μg/m3 for PM10 in subjects with hypertension, diabetes, or a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, respectively, which were higher than the values for subjects without hypertension (0.55 mmHg; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.94), diabetes (0.64 mmHg; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.96), or with a BMI < 25 kg/m2 (0.59 mmHg; 95% CI: 0.22, 0.97). The p-values for interaction of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity with PM10 in the model were 0.03, 0.06, and 0.07, respectively. Similar results of stratified analyses results were observed for the association of PM2.5 absorbance with diastolic BP. The p-values for interaction of the three comorbidity categories with PM2.5 absorbance were 0.08, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively. The increase in diastolic BP with exposure of PM2.5–10 was also higher in subjects with hypertension than without hypertension (p-value of interaction: 0.07), but associations were only slightly stronger among those with diabetes or obesity (interaction p-values = 0.17 and 0.27, respectively). The associations between diastolic BP and NOx or NO2 did not differ according to comorbidity categories (data not shown). Estimates of associations with systolic or diastolic BP stratified according to a previous diagnosis of hypertension (n = 12,702) versus no previous history of hypertension (n = 15,050, including participants with elevated systolic or diastolic BP at the study examination) (see Supplemental Material, Table S4), were generally consistent with stratum-specific estimates when hypertension also included participants with elevated SBP or DBP at the study examination but no history of physician-diagnosed hypertension (as shown for selected exposure and diastolic BP in Figure 1).


Associations between Long-Term Air Pollutant Exposures and Blood Pressure in Elderly Residents of Taipei City: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Chen SY, Wu CF, Lee JH, Hoffmann B, Peters A, Brunekreef B, Chu DC, Chan CC - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Estimates (95% CIs) of diastolic blood pressure in association with an increment of 10 μg/m3 for PM10, 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5–10, and 10–5/m for PM2.5 absorbance stratified by hypertensive (physician-diagnosed hypertension or measured unknown hypertension), diabetic (physician-diagnosed diabetes and use of antidiabetic medication or fasting glucose > 126 mg/dL in health examination), or obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) status. The estimates were calculated by generalized linear models, adjusted for sex, age, age mean-centered square, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education, traffic proximity, and individual comorbid conditions other than analyzed stratum.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529013&req=5

f1: Estimates (95% CIs) of diastolic blood pressure in association with an increment of 10 μg/m3 for PM10, 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5–10, and 10–5/m for PM2.5 absorbance stratified by hypertensive (physician-diagnosed hypertension or measured unknown hypertension), diabetic (physician-diagnosed diabetes and use of antidiabetic medication or fasting glucose > 126 mg/dL in health examination), or obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) status. The estimates were calculated by generalized linear models, adjusted for sex, age, age mean-centered square, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education, traffic proximity, and individual comorbid conditions other than analyzed stratum.
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the associations between diastolic BP and PM10, PM2.5–10, and PM2.5 absorbance stratified by an individual’s comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, or obesity. We found 0.95 mmHg (95% CI: 0.50, 1.40), 1.33 mmHg (95% CI: 0.51, 2.15), and 0.99 mmHg (95% CI: 0.50, 1.48) increase in diastolic BP for an increment of 10 μg/m3 for PM10 in subjects with hypertension, diabetes, or a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, respectively, which were higher than the values for subjects without hypertension (0.55 mmHg; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.94), diabetes (0.64 mmHg; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.96), or with a BMI < 25 kg/m2 (0.59 mmHg; 95% CI: 0.22, 0.97). The p-values for interaction of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity with PM10 in the model were 0.03, 0.06, and 0.07, respectively. Similar results of stratified analyses results were observed for the association of PM2.5 absorbance with diastolic BP. The p-values for interaction of the three comorbidity categories with PM2.5 absorbance were 0.08, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively. The increase in diastolic BP with exposure of PM2.5–10 was also higher in subjects with hypertension than without hypertension (p-value of interaction: 0.07), but associations were only slightly stronger among those with diabetes or obesity (interaction p-values = 0.17 and 0.27, respectively). The associations between diastolic BP and NOx or NO2 did not differ according to comorbidity categories (data not shown). Estimates of associations with systolic or diastolic BP stratified according to a previous diagnosis of hypertension (n = 12,702) versus no previous history of hypertension (n = 15,050, including participants with elevated systolic or diastolic BP at the study examination) (see Supplemental Material, Table S4), were generally consistent with stratum-specific estimates when hypertension also included participants with elevated SBP or DBP at the study examination but no history of physician-diagnosed hypertension (as shown for selected exposure and diastolic BP in Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Diastolic BP was associated with 1-year exposures to air pollution, with estimates of 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44, 1.03], 0.46 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.63), 0.62 (95% CI: 0.24, 0.99), 0.34 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.50), and 0.65 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.85) mmHg for PM10 (10 μg/m3), PM2.5-10 (5 μg/m3), PM2.5 absorbance (10-5/m), NOx (20 μg/m3), and NO2 (10 μg/m3), respectively.PM2.5 was not associated with diastolic BP, and none of the air pollutants was associated with systolic BP.One-year exposures to PM10, PM2.5-10, PM2.5 absorbance, and NOx were associated with higher diastolic BP in elderly residents of Taipei.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Limited information is available regarding long-term effects of air pollution on blood pressure (BP) and hypertension.

Objective: We studied whether 1-year exposures to particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) were correlated with BP and hypertension in the elderly.

Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 27,752 Taipei City residents > 65 years of age who participated in a health examination program in 2009. Land-use regression models were used to estimate participants' 1-year exposures to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), coarse particles (PM2.5-10), fine particles (≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5), PM2.5 absorbance, NOx, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Generalized linear regressions and logistic regressions were used to examine the association between air pollution and BP and hypertension, respectively.

Results: Diastolic BP was associated with 1-year exposures to air pollution, with estimates of 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44, 1.03], 0.46 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.63), 0.62 (95% CI: 0.24, 0.99), 0.34 (95% CI: 0.19, 0.50), and 0.65 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.85) mmHg for PM10 (10 μg/m3), PM2.5-10 (5 μg/m3), PM2.5 absorbance (10-5/m), NOx (20 μg/m3), and NO2 (10 μg/m3), respectively. PM2.5 was not associated with diastolic BP, and none of the air pollutants was associated with systolic BP. Associations of diastolic BP with PM10 and PM2.5 absorbance were stronger among participants with hypertension, diabetes, or a body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 than among participants without these conditions. One-year air pollution exposures were not associated with hypertension.

Conclusions: One-year exposures to PM10, PM2.5-10, PM2.5 absorbance, and NOx were associated with higher diastolic BP in elderly residents of Taipei.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus