Limits...
Air Pollution and Lung Function in Dutch Children: A Comparison of Exposure Estimates and Associations Based on Land Use Regression and Dispersion Exposure Modeling Approaches.

Wang M, Gehring U, Hoek G, Keuken M, Jonkers S, Beelen R, Eeftens M, Postma DS, Brunekreef B - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Bottom Line: Correlations between LUR- and dispersion-modeled pollution concentrations were high for NO2, PM2.5, and PM2.5 soot (R = 0.86-0.90) but low for PM10 (R = 0.57).Predictions from LUR and dispersion models correlated very well for PM2.5, NO2, and PM2.5 soot but not for PM10.Health effect estimates did not depend on the type of model used to estimate exposure in a population of Dutch children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited knowledge about the extent to which estimates of air pollution effects on health are affected by the choice for a specific exposure model.

Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the correlation between long-term air pollution exposure estimates using two commonly used exposure modeling techniques [dispersion and land use regression (LUR) models] and, in addition, to compare the estimates of the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and lung function in children using these exposure modeling techniques.

Methods: We used data of 1,058 participants of a Dutch birth cohort study with measured forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements at 8 years of age. For each child, annual average outdoor air pollution exposure [nitrogen dioxide (NO2), mass concentration of particulate matter with diameters ≤ 2.5 and ≤ 10 μm (PM2.5, PM10), and PM2.5 soot] was estimated for the current addresses of the participants by a dispersion and a LUR model. Associations between exposures to air pollution and lung function parameters were estimated using linear regression analysis with confounder adjustment.

Results: Correlations between LUR- and dispersion-modeled pollution concentrations were high for NO2, PM2.5, and PM2.5 soot (R = 0.86-0.90) but low for PM10 (R = 0.57). Associations with lung function were similar for air pollutant exposures estimated using LUR and dispersion modeling, except for associations of PM2.5 with FEV1 and FVC, which were stronger but less precise for exposures based on LUR compared with dispersion model.

Conclusions: Predictions from LUR and dispersion models correlated very well for PM2.5, NO2, and PM2.5 soot but not for PM10. Health effect estimates did not depend on the type of model used to estimate exposure in a population of Dutch children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted associations of annual levels of air pollutants estimated by dispersion and LUR modeling approaches with FEV1, FVC, and PEF level (n = 1,058) at the PIAMA current addresses. The increment of each pollutant is calculated by 10 μg/m3 for NO2 and PM10, 1 × 10–5/m for PM2.5 soot, and 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529005&req=5

f3: Adjusted associations of annual levels of air pollutants estimated by dispersion and LUR modeling approaches with FEV1, FVC, and PEF level (n = 1,058) at the PIAMA current addresses. The increment of each pollutant is calculated by 10 μg/m3 for NO2 and PM10, 1 × 10–5/m for PM2.5 soot, and 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5.

Mentions: Associations between lung function and exposure estimated by different approaches. Overall, we found consistent negative associations between the lung function parameters FEV1 and FVC and long-term exposure to air pollution estimated by both dispersion and LUR models at the current home addresses (Figure 3). The magnitudes of the effect estimates were similar for NO2, PM2.5 soot, and PM10, but negative associations with PM2.5 were stronger for exposure estimates based on LUR compared with estimates based on dispersion modeling. The 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were similar for NO2 and PM2.5 soot but larger for PM2.5 and PM10 estimates by LUR models than for PM2.5 and PM10 estimates by dispersion models. No significant associations were found between air pollution estimated by any of the exposure approaches and PEF. Effect estimates for concentrations estimated at the birth addresses were somewhat weaker than for the current addresses (results not shown). Associations with FVC remained significant based on two-pollutant models for NO2 and PM2.5 when exposures were estimated using the localized LUR models (–2.4% difference; 95% CI: –4.1, –0.8 and –9.5% difference; 95% CI: –18.2, –0.9 for NO2 and PM2.5, respectively) but were no longer significant when exposures were estimated using the dispersion models (–2.0% difference; 95% CI: –4.2, 0.3 and –3.0% difference; 95% CI: –7.8, 2.0, respectively).


Air Pollution and Lung Function in Dutch Children: A Comparison of Exposure Estimates and Associations Based on Land Use Regression and Dispersion Exposure Modeling Approaches.

Wang M, Gehring U, Hoek G, Keuken M, Jonkers S, Beelen R, Eeftens M, Postma DS, Brunekreef B - Environ. Health Perspect. (2015)

Adjusted associations of annual levels of air pollutants estimated by dispersion and LUR modeling approaches with FEV1, FVC, and PEF level (n = 1,058) at the PIAMA current addresses. The increment of each pollutant is calculated by 10 μg/m3 for NO2 and PM10, 1 × 10–5/m for PM2.5 soot, and 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5.
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529005&req=5

f3: Adjusted associations of annual levels of air pollutants estimated by dispersion and LUR modeling approaches with FEV1, FVC, and PEF level (n = 1,058) at the PIAMA current addresses. The increment of each pollutant is calculated by 10 μg/m3 for NO2 and PM10, 1 × 10–5/m for PM2.5 soot, and 5 μg/m3 for PM2.5.
Mentions: Associations between lung function and exposure estimated by different approaches. Overall, we found consistent negative associations between the lung function parameters FEV1 and FVC and long-term exposure to air pollution estimated by both dispersion and LUR models at the current home addresses (Figure 3). The magnitudes of the effect estimates were similar for NO2, PM2.5 soot, and PM10, but negative associations with PM2.5 were stronger for exposure estimates based on LUR compared with estimates based on dispersion modeling. The 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were similar for NO2 and PM2.5 soot but larger for PM2.5 and PM10 estimates by LUR models than for PM2.5 and PM10 estimates by dispersion models. No significant associations were found between air pollution estimated by any of the exposure approaches and PEF. Effect estimates for concentrations estimated at the birth addresses were somewhat weaker than for the current addresses (results not shown). Associations with FVC remained significant based on two-pollutant models for NO2 and PM2.5 when exposures were estimated using the localized LUR models (–2.4% difference; 95% CI: –4.1, –0.8 and –9.5% difference; 95% CI: –18.2, –0.9 for NO2 and PM2.5, respectively) but were no longer significant when exposures were estimated using the dispersion models (–2.0% difference; 95% CI: –4.2, 0.3 and –3.0% difference; 95% CI: –7.8, 2.0, respectively).

Bottom Line: Correlations between LUR- and dispersion-modeled pollution concentrations were high for NO2, PM2.5, and PM2.5 soot (R = 0.86-0.90) but low for PM10 (R = 0.57).Predictions from LUR and dispersion models correlated very well for PM2.5, NO2, and PM2.5 soot but not for PM10.Health effect estimates did not depend on the type of model used to estimate exposure in a population of Dutch children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited knowledge about the extent to which estimates of air pollution effects on health are affected by the choice for a specific exposure model.

Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the correlation between long-term air pollution exposure estimates using two commonly used exposure modeling techniques [dispersion and land use regression (LUR) models] and, in addition, to compare the estimates of the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and lung function in children using these exposure modeling techniques.

Methods: We used data of 1,058 participants of a Dutch birth cohort study with measured forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements at 8 years of age. For each child, annual average outdoor air pollution exposure [nitrogen dioxide (NO2), mass concentration of particulate matter with diameters ≤ 2.5 and ≤ 10 μm (PM2.5, PM10), and PM2.5 soot] was estimated for the current addresses of the participants by a dispersion and a LUR model. Associations between exposures to air pollution and lung function parameters were estimated using linear regression analysis with confounder adjustment.

Results: Correlations between LUR- and dispersion-modeled pollution concentrations were high for NO2, PM2.5, and PM2.5 soot (R = 0.86-0.90) but low for PM10 (R = 0.57). Associations with lung function were similar for air pollutant exposures estimated using LUR and dispersion modeling, except for associations of PM2.5 with FEV1 and FVC, which were stronger but less precise for exposures based on LUR compared with dispersion model.

Conclusions: Predictions from LUR and dispersion models correlated very well for PM2.5, NO2, and PM2.5 soot but not for PM10. Health effect estimates did not depend on the type of model used to estimate exposure in a population of Dutch children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus