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Two Cases of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation of the Common Peroneal Nerve Successfully Treating Refractory, Multifactorial Leg Edema.

Ingves MV, Power AH - J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: The geko device is a self-contained neuromuscular stimulation device that adheres to skin over the common peroneal nerve and delivers a low-voltage stimulus that activates the lower-leg musculature resulting in enhanced superficial femoral vein blood flow and velocity.The device also improved pain and chronic wound healing.Although the geko device is costly, it was well tolerated and may provide another treatment strategy for resistant leg swelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Western University, London, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The treatment of leg edema often involves promoting venous blood flow but can be difficult in patients with comorbidities that prevent traditional management strategies such as limb elevation or mechanical compression devices. The geko device is a self-contained neuromuscular stimulation device that adheres to skin over the common peroneal nerve and delivers a low-voltage stimulus that activates the lower-leg musculature resulting in enhanced superficial femoral vein blood flow and velocity. Here we report 2 cases of multifactorial and refractory leg edema successfully treated with the geko device over a period of 4 to 16 weeks. The device also improved pain and chronic wound healing. Although the geko device is costly, it was well tolerated and may provide another treatment strategy for resistant leg swelling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photographs before (A and B) and following (C) a 4-week course of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation using the geko device to treat left leg below-knee swelling and pain in a 70-year-old man. Placement of the device over the common peroneal nerve (B and C) activated the short head of the biceps femoris muscle.
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fig2-2324709614559839: Photographs before (A and B) and following (C) a 4-week course of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation using the geko device to treat left leg below-knee swelling and pain in a 70-year-old man. Placement of the device over the common peroneal nerve (B and C) activated the short head of the biceps femoris muscle.

Mentions: The second patient was a 70-year-old man with complex left leg swelling and pain. He had a Charcot left foot deformity, foot ulcers, and peripheral neuropathy secondary to diabetes mellitus. He wore a leg brace and an orthotic boot on his left leg. A right diabetic foot infection led to a right below-knee amputation. He had multiple reasons for lower-extremity edema, including a significant cardiac history, renal failure, chronic venous insufficiency, and liver cirrhosis. The patient presented with a 1-month history of left lower leg edema below the knee. Consequently, he was no longer able to fit into his left leg brace and orthotic boot, and he developed significant pain that limited his ability to ambulate and elevate his leg for prolonged periods. The swelling in his left lower leg was maximal in the ankle and foot (Figure 2). Because of failure of traditional management, we proceeded with a trial of the geko device to treat his leg swelling.


Two Cases of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation of the Common Peroneal Nerve Successfully Treating Refractory, Multifactorial Leg Edema.

Ingves MV, Power AH - J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep (2014)

Photographs before (A and B) and following (C) a 4-week course of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation using the geko device to treat left leg below-knee swelling and pain in a 70-year-old man. Placement of the device over the common peroneal nerve (B and C) activated the short head of the biceps femoris muscle.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528879&req=5

fig2-2324709614559839: Photographs before (A and B) and following (C) a 4-week course of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation using the geko device to treat left leg below-knee swelling and pain in a 70-year-old man. Placement of the device over the common peroneal nerve (B and C) activated the short head of the biceps femoris muscle.
Mentions: The second patient was a 70-year-old man with complex left leg swelling and pain. He had a Charcot left foot deformity, foot ulcers, and peripheral neuropathy secondary to diabetes mellitus. He wore a leg brace and an orthotic boot on his left leg. A right diabetic foot infection led to a right below-knee amputation. He had multiple reasons for lower-extremity edema, including a significant cardiac history, renal failure, chronic venous insufficiency, and liver cirrhosis. The patient presented with a 1-month history of left lower leg edema below the knee. Consequently, he was no longer able to fit into his left leg brace and orthotic boot, and he developed significant pain that limited his ability to ambulate and elevate his leg for prolonged periods. The swelling in his left lower leg was maximal in the ankle and foot (Figure 2). Because of failure of traditional management, we proceeded with a trial of the geko device to treat his leg swelling.

Bottom Line: The geko device is a self-contained neuromuscular stimulation device that adheres to skin over the common peroneal nerve and delivers a low-voltage stimulus that activates the lower-leg musculature resulting in enhanced superficial femoral vein blood flow and velocity.The device also improved pain and chronic wound healing.Although the geko device is costly, it was well tolerated and may provide another treatment strategy for resistant leg swelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Western University, London, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The treatment of leg edema often involves promoting venous blood flow but can be difficult in patients with comorbidities that prevent traditional management strategies such as limb elevation or mechanical compression devices. The geko device is a self-contained neuromuscular stimulation device that adheres to skin over the common peroneal nerve and delivers a low-voltage stimulus that activates the lower-leg musculature resulting in enhanced superficial femoral vein blood flow and velocity. Here we report 2 cases of multifactorial and refractory leg edema successfully treated with the geko device over a period of 4 to 16 weeks. The device also improved pain and chronic wound healing. Although the geko device is costly, it was well tolerated and may provide another treatment strategy for resistant leg swelling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus