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Light, heat, action: neural control of fruit fly behaviour.

Owald D, Lin S, Waddell S - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The same cellular precision can also be exploited to express genetically encoded reporters of neural activity and cell-signalling pathways.Combining these approaches in living behaving animals has great potential to generate a holistic view of behavioural control that transcends the usual molecular, cellular and systems boundaries.In this review, we discuss these approaches with particular emphasis on the pioneering studies and those involving learning and memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, University of Oxford, Tinsley Building, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3SR, UK.

ABSTRACT
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a popular model to investigate fundamental principles of neural circuit operation. The sophisticated genetics and small brain permit a cellular resolution understanding of innate and learned behavioural processes. Relatively recent genetic and technical advances provide the means to specifically and reproducibly manipulate the function of many fly neurons with temporal resolution. The same cellular precision can also be exploited to express genetically encoded reporters of neural activity and cell-signalling pathways. Combining these approaches in living behaving animals has great potential to generate a holistic view of behavioural control that transcends the usual molecular, cellular and systems boundaries. In this review, we discuss these approaches with particular emphasis on the pioneering studies and those involving learning and memory.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic illustrating some of the many behaviours that have been investigated using fruit fly genetics. Flies must decide which of the homeostatic behaviours, sleep, feed, drink, mate, fight and groom, to preferentially engage in and which mode of locomotion, walk, jump or fly, to employ to accomplish getting where they need to go. They can also adjust their strategy through learning.
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RSTB20140211F1: Schematic illustrating some of the many behaviours that have been investigated using fruit fly genetics. Flies must decide which of the homeostatic behaviours, sleep, feed, drink, mate, fight and groom, to preferentially engage in and which mode of locomotion, walk, jump or fly, to employ to accomplish getting where they need to go. They can also adjust their strategy through learning.

Mentions: We now know that in addition to being a fantastic genetic model, the fruit fly nervous system has an intermediate numerical complexity to the worm or mouse, making it an appropriate model to study conserved neural circuit underpinnings controlling a fairly sophisticated behavioural repertoire. The approximately 100 000 neurons of the fly brain orchestrate behaviours that facilitate the survival and propagation of the species (figure 1). Recent genetic tools now allow one to reproducibly and specifically manipulate the activity of many neuron types in the fly brain. This ability to directly influence the function of specific cells is a key feature of the studies emphasized here.FigureĀ 1.


Light, heat, action: neural control of fruit fly behaviour.

Owald D, Lin S, Waddell S - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2015)

Schematic illustrating some of the many behaviours that have been investigated using fruit fly genetics. Flies must decide which of the homeostatic behaviours, sleep, feed, drink, mate, fight and groom, to preferentially engage in and which mode of locomotion, walk, jump or fly, to employ to accomplish getting where they need to go. They can also adjust their strategy through learning.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528823&req=5

RSTB20140211F1: Schematic illustrating some of the many behaviours that have been investigated using fruit fly genetics. Flies must decide which of the homeostatic behaviours, sleep, feed, drink, mate, fight and groom, to preferentially engage in and which mode of locomotion, walk, jump or fly, to employ to accomplish getting where they need to go. They can also adjust their strategy through learning.
Mentions: We now know that in addition to being a fantastic genetic model, the fruit fly nervous system has an intermediate numerical complexity to the worm or mouse, making it an appropriate model to study conserved neural circuit underpinnings controlling a fairly sophisticated behavioural repertoire. The approximately 100 000 neurons of the fly brain orchestrate behaviours that facilitate the survival and propagation of the species (figure 1). Recent genetic tools now allow one to reproducibly and specifically manipulate the activity of many neuron types in the fly brain. This ability to directly influence the function of specific cells is a key feature of the studies emphasized here.FigureĀ 1.

Bottom Line: The same cellular precision can also be exploited to express genetically encoded reporters of neural activity and cell-signalling pathways.Combining these approaches in living behaving animals has great potential to generate a holistic view of behavioural control that transcends the usual molecular, cellular and systems boundaries.In this review, we discuss these approaches with particular emphasis on the pioneering studies and those involving learning and memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, University of Oxford, Tinsley Building, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3SR, UK.

ABSTRACT
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a popular model to investigate fundamental principles of neural circuit operation. The sophisticated genetics and small brain permit a cellular resolution understanding of innate and learned behavioural processes. Relatively recent genetic and technical advances provide the means to specifically and reproducibly manipulate the function of many fly neurons with temporal resolution. The same cellular precision can also be exploited to express genetically encoded reporters of neural activity and cell-signalling pathways. Combining these approaches in living behaving animals has great potential to generate a holistic view of behavioural control that transcends the usual molecular, cellular and systems boundaries. In this review, we discuss these approaches with particular emphasis on the pioneering studies and those involving learning and memory.

No MeSH data available.