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Metachronous tubulovillous and tubular adenomas of the anal canal.

Nozawa H, Ishihara S, Morikawa T, Tanaka J, Yasuda K, Ohtani K, Nishikawa T, Tanaka T, Kiyomatsu T, Kawai K, Hata K, Kazama S, Yamaguchi H, Sunami E, Kitayama J, Fukayama M, Watanabe T - Diagn Pathol (2015)

Bottom Line: Local excision of the tumor was performed, and the lesion was pathologically confirmed to be tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia limited to the mucosa.Although she had a past history of cervical cancer, the multiple tumors arising in the anal canal were unlikely to be related to human papilloma virus infection.Our case report underscores the importance of careful observations throughout colonoscopy to detect precancerous lesions, particularly in anatomically narrow segments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan. hiroanozawa-gi@umin.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Anal canal adenoma is an extremely rare disease that has the potential to transform into a malignant tumor. We herein presented a rare case of metachronous multiple adenomas of the anal canal. A 48-year-old woman underwent total colonoscopy following a positive fecal blood test. A 9-mm villous polyp arising from the posterior wall of the anal canal was removed by snare polypectomy. Histologically, the tumor was tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and the cut end was negative for tumor cells. Six years later, an elevated lesion, macroscopically five millimeters in size, was detected in the left wall of the anal canal in a follow-up colonoscopy. Local excision of the tumor was performed, and the lesion was pathologically confirmed to be tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia limited to the mucosa. The patient is currently alive without any evidence of recurrence for six months after surgery. Although she had a past history of cervical cancer, the multiple tumors arising in the anal canal were unlikely to be related to human papilloma virus infection. Our case report underscores the importance of careful observations throughout colonoscopy to detect precancerous lesions, particularly in anatomically narrow segments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunohistochemical staining of p16 in cervical cancer (original magnification: 200 ×). Bar indicates 100 μm
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Fig1: Immunohistochemical staining of p16 in cervical cancer (original magnification: 200 ×). Bar indicates 100 μm

Mentions: A 40-year-old woman visited the Gynecological Department of our hospital with atypical genital bleeding for one and a half years. She was diagnosed with cervical cancer and subsequently underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Pathology of the resected cervix showed the non-keratinizing type of squamous cell carcinoma, measuring 2.5 × 2.5 cm in size, without nodal involvement (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1). Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cancer cells were diffusely positive for p16 (CDKN2A) (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Metachronous tubulovillous and tubular adenomas of the anal canal.

Nozawa H, Ishihara S, Morikawa T, Tanaka J, Yasuda K, Ohtani K, Nishikawa T, Tanaka T, Kiyomatsu T, Kawai K, Hata K, Kazama S, Yamaguchi H, Sunami E, Kitayama J, Fukayama M, Watanabe T - Diagn Pathol (2015)

Immunohistochemical staining of p16 in cervical cancer (original magnification: 200 ×). Bar indicates 100 μm
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528720&req=5

Fig1: Immunohistochemical staining of p16 in cervical cancer (original magnification: 200 ×). Bar indicates 100 μm
Mentions: A 40-year-old woman visited the Gynecological Department of our hospital with atypical genital bleeding for one and a half years. She was diagnosed with cervical cancer and subsequently underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Pathology of the resected cervix showed the non-keratinizing type of squamous cell carcinoma, measuring 2.5 × 2.5 cm in size, without nodal involvement (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1). Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cancer cells were diffusely positive for p16 (CDKN2A) (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Local excision of the tumor was performed, and the lesion was pathologically confirmed to be tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia limited to the mucosa.Although she had a past history of cervical cancer, the multiple tumors arising in the anal canal were unlikely to be related to human papilloma virus infection.Our case report underscores the importance of careful observations throughout colonoscopy to detect precancerous lesions, particularly in anatomically narrow segments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan. hiroanozawa-gi@umin.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Anal canal adenoma is an extremely rare disease that has the potential to transform into a malignant tumor. We herein presented a rare case of metachronous multiple adenomas of the anal canal. A 48-year-old woman underwent total colonoscopy following a positive fecal blood test. A 9-mm villous polyp arising from the posterior wall of the anal canal was removed by snare polypectomy. Histologically, the tumor was tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and the cut end was negative for tumor cells. Six years later, an elevated lesion, macroscopically five millimeters in size, was detected in the left wall of the anal canal in a follow-up colonoscopy. Local excision of the tumor was performed, and the lesion was pathologically confirmed to be tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia limited to the mucosa. The patient is currently alive without any evidence of recurrence for six months after surgery. Although she had a past history of cervical cancer, the multiple tumors arising in the anal canal were unlikely to be related to human papilloma virus infection. Our case report underscores the importance of careful observations throughout colonoscopy to detect precancerous lesions, particularly in anatomically narrow segments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus