Limits...
A case of episcleral tattooing--an emerging body modification trend.

Brodie J, El Galhud H, Bates A - BMC Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: For now we can only speculate as to the long-term consequences, but these may include carcinogenic change or granulomatous inflammation.We feel that the potential risks of the procedure should be communicated more widely to those body modification practitioners undertaking it.This practice could result in more serious presentations to acute eye services in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ophthalmology Department, Maidstone Hospital, Hermitage Lane, Maidstone, Kent, ME16 9QQ, UK. jtbrodie@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2007 an article was published describing the first forays into the practice of episcleral tattooing. Currently only a handful of people worldwide have undergone this procedure, whereby a needle is used to inject dye under the bulbar conjunctiva. To date there have been no previous reports of the risks and complications of this emerging practice in the medical literature. We present a case involving a complication that arose in one of the few people in Britain to have undergone episcleral tattooing for cosmetic purposes.

Case presentation: A 43-year-old Caucasian man presented to the eye casualty clinic with red, lumpy conjunctivae bilaterally, having undergone episcleral tattooing 7 weeks previously. On examination there were 3 distinct areas of conjunctival swelling in each eye, representing a total of 6 injection sites. No other gross abnormalities were identified. The clinical picture remained unchanged 6 months on, apart from a degree of fading of the conjunctival dye. He will remain under our care to ensure that any further complications such as granulomatous inflammation are managed and documented.

Conclusion: Episcleral tattooing is carried out by individuals with no medical training. The short-term complications reported so far include: headaches, severe photophobia, persistent foreign body sensation, and migration of ink staining. More serious short-term risks such as infection, globe penetration, and peri-ocular haemorrhage could occur. For now we can only speculate as to the long-term consequences, but these may include carcinogenic change or granulomatous inflammation. We feel that the potential risks of the procedure should be communicated more widely to those body modification practitioners undertaking it. This practice could result in more serious presentations to acute eye services in the future.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Left eye showing fading of conjunctival dye at 6 months follow up
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528695&req=5

Fig3: Left eye showing fading of conjunctival dye at 6 months follow up

Mentions: On slit lamp examination there were 3 distinct areas of conjunctival swelling in each eye, representing a total of 6 injection sites (Fig. 2). Apart from this aesthetically poor, persistent lumpy appearance, no other gross abnormalities were identified. Fundal examination and intraocular pressure measurements were also normal. The clinical picture remained unchanged 6 months on, apart from a degree of fading of the conjunctival dye (Fig. 3). He will remain under our care to ensure that any further complications such as granulomatous inflammation are managed and documented.Fig. 2


A case of episcleral tattooing--an emerging body modification trend.

Brodie J, El Galhud H, Bates A - BMC Ophthalmol (2015)

Left eye showing fading of conjunctival dye at 6 months follow up
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528695&req=5

Fig3: Left eye showing fading of conjunctival dye at 6 months follow up
Mentions: On slit lamp examination there were 3 distinct areas of conjunctival swelling in each eye, representing a total of 6 injection sites (Fig. 2). Apart from this aesthetically poor, persistent lumpy appearance, no other gross abnormalities were identified. Fundal examination and intraocular pressure measurements were also normal. The clinical picture remained unchanged 6 months on, apart from a degree of fading of the conjunctival dye (Fig. 3). He will remain under our care to ensure that any further complications such as granulomatous inflammation are managed and documented.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: For now we can only speculate as to the long-term consequences, but these may include carcinogenic change or granulomatous inflammation.We feel that the potential risks of the procedure should be communicated more widely to those body modification practitioners undertaking it.This practice could result in more serious presentations to acute eye services in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ophthalmology Department, Maidstone Hospital, Hermitage Lane, Maidstone, Kent, ME16 9QQ, UK. jtbrodie@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2007 an article was published describing the first forays into the practice of episcleral tattooing. Currently only a handful of people worldwide have undergone this procedure, whereby a needle is used to inject dye under the bulbar conjunctiva. To date there have been no previous reports of the risks and complications of this emerging practice in the medical literature. We present a case involving a complication that arose in one of the few people in Britain to have undergone episcleral tattooing for cosmetic purposes.

Case presentation: A 43-year-old Caucasian man presented to the eye casualty clinic with red, lumpy conjunctivae bilaterally, having undergone episcleral tattooing 7 weeks previously. On examination there were 3 distinct areas of conjunctival swelling in each eye, representing a total of 6 injection sites. No other gross abnormalities were identified. The clinical picture remained unchanged 6 months on, apart from a degree of fading of the conjunctival dye. He will remain under our care to ensure that any further complications such as granulomatous inflammation are managed and documented.

Conclusion: Episcleral tattooing is carried out by individuals with no medical training. The short-term complications reported so far include: headaches, severe photophobia, persistent foreign body sensation, and migration of ink staining. More serious short-term risks such as infection, globe penetration, and peri-ocular haemorrhage could occur. For now we can only speculate as to the long-term consequences, but these may include carcinogenic change or granulomatous inflammation. We feel that the potential risks of the procedure should be communicated more widely to those body modification practitioners undertaking it. This practice could result in more serious presentations to acute eye services in the future.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus