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Pursuing the impossible: an interview with Tim Hunt.

Hunt T - BMC Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation.From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK.He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: , ᅟ, ᅟ. Tim.Hunt@crick.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation. From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK. He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Jaques Loeb’s book Artificial Parthenogenesis and Fertilization
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig3: Jaques Loeb’s book Artificial Parthenogenesis and Fertilization

Mentions: I think it’s quite funny really. For some reason, I’d come across the work of Jacque Loeb, who’d written a book called Artificial Parthenogenesis and Fertilisation [2] (Fig. 3). I think it was my religious upbringing that led me to enjoy doing experiments on the biochemistry of virgin birth. Loeb described experiments where things like dilute soap solutions or ammonia would cause the sea urchin eggs to activate and get going. At the time, in 1982, my main research problem was going very badly, so as a sort of afterthought — the formal part of teaching the course had stopped — I just idly wondered whether the patterns of protein synthesis in parthenogenetically activated sea urchin eggs was the same as or different from what happened when you fertilized them properly.Fig. 3


Pursuing the impossible: an interview with Tim Hunt.

Hunt T - BMC Biol. (2015)

Jaques Loeb’s book Artificial Parthenogenesis and Fertilization
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528683&req=5

Fig3: Jaques Loeb’s book Artificial Parthenogenesis and Fertilization
Mentions: I think it’s quite funny really. For some reason, I’d come across the work of Jacque Loeb, who’d written a book called Artificial Parthenogenesis and Fertilisation [2] (Fig. 3). I think it was my religious upbringing that led me to enjoy doing experiments on the biochemistry of virgin birth. Loeb described experiments where things like dilute soap solutions or ammonia would cause the sea urchin eggs to activate and get going. At the time, in 1982, my main research problem was going very badly, so as a sort of afterthought — the formal part of teaching the course had stopped — I just idly wondered whether the patterns of protein synthesis in parthenogenetically activated sea urchin eggs was the same as or different from what happened when you fertilized them properly.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation.From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK.He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: , ᅟ, ᅟ. Tim.Hunt@crick.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation. From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK. He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus