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Pursuing the impossible: an interview with Tim Hunt.

Hunt T - BMC Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation.From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK.He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: , ᅟ, ᅟ. Tim.Hunt@crick.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation. From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK. He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The first three divisions of a fertilized sea urchin egg
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Fig2: The first three divisions of a fertilized sea urchin egg

Mentions: So I began to think about cell cycle control from that moment. I was working on the activation of protein synthesis in sea urchin (Fig. 1) and clam eggs at the time and we began to wonder why it was that — again something that had been known for a long time — fertilised sea urchin eggs needed new protein synthesis in order to divide: what were these proteins — we assumed there were several proteins — that they needed to divide? We knew they could synthesise DNA without new protein synthesis, but they couldn’t divide. Sometime around then a paper was published that showed that there was a critical period for each cycle where you had to make new proteins in order for the next division to take place. That didn’t strike anybody as unusual, because if you think about normal cells, they have to double in size, so of course they need to make new proteins. But sea urchin eggs don’t double in size, they actually halve in size at each division (Fig. 2) — and nor do clams’. So that’s really what triggered it.Fig. 1


Pursuing the impossible: an interview with Tim Hunt.

Hunt T - BMC Biol. (2015)

The first three divisions of a fertilized sea urchin egg
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528683&req=5

Fig2: The first three divisions of a fertilized sea urchin egg
Mentions: So I began to think about cell cycle control from that moment. I was working on the activation of protein synthesis in sea urchin (Fig. 1) and clam eggs at the time and we began to wonder why it was that — again something that had been known for a long time — fertilised sea urchin eggs needed new protein synthesis in order to divide: what were these proteins — we assumed there were several proteins — that they needed to divide? We knew they could synthesise DNA without new protein synthesis, but they couldn’t divide. Sometime around then a paper was published that showed that there was a critical period for each cycle where you had to make new proteins in order for the next division to take place. That didn’t strike anybody as unusual, because if you think about normal cells, they have to double in size, so of course they need to make new proteins. But sea urchin eggs don’t double in size, they actually halve in size at each division (Fig. 2) — and nor do clams’. So that’s really what triggered it.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation.From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK.He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: , ᅟ, ᅟ. Tim.Hunt@crick.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Tim Hunt took an undergraduate degree in Natural Sciences at Cambridge in 1964, and his PhD and subsequent work focussed on the control of protein synthesis until 1982, when his adventitious discovery of the central cell cycle regulator cyclin, while he was teaching at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, redirected him to the study of cell cycle regulation. From 1990 to his retirement Tim worked in the Clare Hall Laboratories of Cancer Research UK. He shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine with Lee Hartwell and Paul Nurse in 2001, and talked to us about the series of coincidences that led him to the prizewinning discovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus