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Self-encapsulation, or the 'dripping' of an elastic rod.

Bosi F, Misseroni D, Dal Corso F, Bigoni D - Proc. Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span.This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve.This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DICAM , University of Trento , via Mesiano 77, Trento 38123, Italy.

ABSTRACT

A rod covering a fixed span is loaded at the middle with a transverse force, such that with increasing load a progressive deflection occurs. After a certain initial deflection, a phenomenon is observed where two points of the rod come in contact with each other. This is defined as the 'dripping point' and is when 'self-encapsulation' of the elastic rod occurs. Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span. However, the elastica governs oscillating pendulums, buckling rods and pendant drops, so that a possibility for self-encapsulation might be imagined. This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve. This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dimensionless ‘Eshelby-like’ force M2L2/(2B2) versus dimensionless transverse load FL2/B. (a) Theoretical solution; (b) comparison between theoretical prediction (black curve) and experimental results performed on three rods differing only in the thickness h, h={1.9;2.85;3.85} mm (reported as blue, red and green curves, respectively). Note the self-encapsulation or dripping point.
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RSPA20150195F9: Dimensionless ‘Eshelby-like’ force M2L2/(2B2) versus dimensionless transverse load FL2/B. (a) Theoretical solution; (b) comparison between theoretical prediction (black curve) and experimental results performed on three rods differing only in the thickness h, h={1.9;2.85;3.85} mm (reported as blue, red and green curves, respectively). Note the self-encapsulation or dripping point.

Mentions: Finally, the configurational force M2/(2B) is reported in figure 9 as a function of the transverse force F (both forces have been made dimensionless), until the dripping point. The theoretical solution (figure 9a) shows that the Eshelby-like force can be much higher than the transverse and dominates the mechanics of the system, as confirmed by the experimental results (figure 9b). Moreover, there are regions in the graph that show that the configurational force increases when the applied transverse force decreases.Figure 9.


Self-encapsulation, or the 'dripping' of an elastic rod.

Bosi F, Misseroni D, Dal Corso F, Bigoni D - Proc. Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. (2015)

Dimensionless ‘Eshelby-like’ force M2L2/(2B2) versus dimensionless transverse load FL2/B. (a) Theoretical solution; (b) comparison between theoretical prediction (black curve) and experimental results performed on three rods differing only in the thickness h, h={1.9;2.85;3.85} mm (reported as blue, red and green curves, respectively). Note the self-encapsulation or dripping point.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528666&req=5

RSPA20150195F9: Dimensionless ‘Eshelby-like’ force M2L2/(2B2) versus dimensionless transverse load FL2/B. (a) Theoretical solution; (b) comparison between theoretical prediction (black curve) and experimental results performed on three rods differing only in the thickness h, h={1.9;2.85;3.85} mm (reported as blue, red and green curves, respectively). Note the self-encapsulation or dripping point.
Mentions: Finally, the configurational force M2/(2B) is reported in figure 9 as a function of the transverse force F (both forces have been made dimensionless), until the dripping point. The theoretical solution (figure 9a) shows that the Eshelby-like force can be much higher than the transverse and dominates the mechanics of the system, as confirmed by the experimental results (figure 9b). Moreover, there are regions in the graph that show that the configurational force increases when the applied transverse force decreases.Figure 9.

Bottom Line: Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span.This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve.This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DICAM , University of Trento , via Mesiano 77, Trento 38123, Italy.

ABSTRACT

A rod covering a fixed span is loaded at the middle with a transverse force, such that with increasing load a progressive deflection occurs. After a certain initial deflection, a phenomenon is observed where two points of the rod come in contact with each other. This is defined as the 'dripping point' and is when 'self-encapsulation' of the elastic rod occurs. Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span. However, the elastica governs oscillating pendulums, buckling rods and pendant drops, so that a possibility for self-encapsulation might be imagined. This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve. This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus