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Self-encapsulation, or the 'dripping' of an elastic rod.

Bosi F, Misseroni D, Dal Corso F, Bigoni D - Proc. Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span.This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve.This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DICAM , University of Trento , via Mesiano 77, Trento 38123, Italy.

ABSTRACT

A rod covering a fixed span is loaded at the middle with a transverse force, such that with increasing load a progressive deflection occurs. After a certain initial deflection, a phenomenon is observed where two points of the rod come in contact with each other. This is defined as the 'dripping point' and is when 'self-encapsulation' of the elastic rod occurs. Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span. However, the elastica governs oscillating pendulums, buckling rods and pendant drops, so that a possibility for self-encapsulation might be imagined. This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve. This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Scheme used to investigate the symmetric solution of the elastic system sketched in figure 2 and loaded at the midspan with a concentrated transverse force F. Loading the structure generates the compressive configurational force M2/2B, acting at the sliding sleeve in the axial direction. Exploiting symmetry, the structure can be divided into four rods of equal length leq/4 subject to the transverse load F/2 and to the axial configurational force M2/2B. (b) The experimental set-up for quasi-static experiments comprising elastic rod (1), load cells (2), movable crosshead (3), bilateral roller (4), sliding sleeve (5) and displacement transducer (6).
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RSPA20150195F4: (a) Scheme used to investigate the symmetric solution of the elastic system sketched in figure 2 and loaded at the midspan with a concentrated transverse force F. Loading the structure generates the compressive configurational force M2/2B, acting at the sliding sleeve in the axial direction. Exploiting symmetry, the structure can be divided into four rods of equal length leq/4 subject to the transverse load F/2 and to the axial configurational force M2/2B. (b) The experimental set-up for quasi-static experiments comprising elastic rod (1), load cells (2), movable crosshead (3), bilateral roller (4), sliding sleeve (5) and displacement transducer (6).

Mentions: Considering symmetric equilibrium configurations, the planar rod constrained by a couple of sliding sleeves at both ends, figure 2, is here analysed by replacing the left sliding sleeve with a clamp, figure 4a. The presence of a clamp on the left end is also representative of the quantitative experimental test described in §3a and performed to measure the Eshelby-like force through a load cell.Figure 4.


Self-encapsulation, or the 'dripping' of an elastic rod.

Bosi F, Misseroni D, Dal Corso F, Bigoni D - Proc. Math. Phys. Eng. Sci. (2015)

(a) Scheme used to investigate the symmetric solution of the elastic system sketched in figure 2 and loaded at the midspan with a concentrated transverse force F. Loading the structure generates the compressive configurational force M2/2B, acting at the sliding sleeve in the axial direction. Exploiting symmetry, the structure can be divided into four rods of equal length leq/4 subject to the transverse load F/2 and to the axial configurational force M2/2B. (b) The experimental set-up for quasi-static experiments comprising elastic rod (1), load cells (2), movable crosshead (3), bilateral roller (4), sliding sleeve (5) and displacement transducer (6).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528666&req=5

RSPA20150195F4: (a) Scheme used to investigate the symmetric solution of the elastic system sketched in figure 2 and loaded at the midspan with a concentrated transverse force F. Loading the structure generates the compressive configurational force M2/2B, acting at the sliding sleeve in the axial direction. Exploiting symmetry, the structure can be divided into four rods of equal length leq/4 subject to the transverse load F/2 and to the axial configurational force M2/2B. (b) The experimental set-up for quasi-static experiments comprising elastic rod (1), load cells (2), movable crosshead (3), bilateral roller (4), sliding sleeve (5) and displacement transducer (6).
Mentions: Considering symmetric equilibrium configurations, the planar rod constrained by a couple of sliding sleeves at both ends, figure 2, is here analysed by replacing the left sliding sleeve with a clamp, figure 4a. The presence of a clamp on the left end is also representative of the quantitative experimental test described in §3a and performed to measure the Eshelby-like force through a load cell.Figure 4.

Bottom Line: Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span.This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve.This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DICAM , University of Trento , via Mesiano 77, Trento 38123, Italy.

ABSTRACT

A rod covering a fixed span is loaded at the middle with a transverse force, such that with increasing load a progressive deflection occurs. After a certain initial deflection, a phenomenon is observed where two points of the rod come in contact with each other. This is defined as the 'dripping point' and is when 'self-encapsulation' of the elastic rod occurs. Dripping seems at a first glance to be impossible and definitely cannot occur in the presence of 'ordinary' constraints (such as simple supports or clamps) at the ends of the span. However, the elastica governs oscillating pendulums, buckling rods and pendant drops, so that a possibility for self-encapsulation might be imagined. This phenomenon is indeed demonstrated (both theoretically and experimentally) to occur when at least one of the constraints at the ends of the rod is a sliding sleeve. This mechanical device generates a configurational force, causing the dripping of the rod, in a fully elastic set-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus