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Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

van der Bijl W, Thyselius M, Kotrschal A, Kolm N - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males.We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response.Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology/Ethology, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 18B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden wouter.van.der.bijl@zoologi.su.se.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of positional data during trials with a model predator, presented as statistical heat maps. First row (a) shows the overall result of each sex, second row (b) splits this up per brain size, and the third row (c) divides the brain size results for females up into the different shoal sizes. Each cell (pixel) in the heat maps shows the p-value of a non-parametric test. In the orange and blue maps, we tested against the median density to visualize the areas of the tanks that were visited more or less than expected. The pink and green maps show the statistical comparison between groups; i.e. males and females or small- and large-brained individuals. Black rectangles indicate predator position. Numbers between parentheses denote sample sizes. Note the nonlinear axis in the legend.
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RSPB20151132F2: Overview of positional data during trials with a model predator, presented as statistical heat maps. First row (a) shows the overall result of each sex, second row (b) splits this up per brain size, and the third row (c) divides the brain size results for females up into the different shoal sizes. Each cell (pixel) in the heat maps shows the p-value of a non-parametric test. In the orange and blue maps, we tested against the median density to visualize the areas of the tanks that were visited more or less than expected. The pink and green maps show the statistical comparison between groups; i.e. males and females or small- and large-brained individuals. Black rectangles indicate predator position. Numbers between parentheses denote sample sizes. Note the nonlinear axis in the legend.

Mentions: We tested the two sexes, two brain sizes and three replicated selection lines in separate trials. As guppies often form small shoals in the field, and the predator response may vary by group size, we used singletons, pairs and shoals of four. The sexes, brain sizes and shoal sizes combined to a total of 12 treatment groups in a fully crossed design. Within each of those treatments, we tested 12 groups, for a total of 144 groups, using 336 fish (112 per replicate, see figure 2 and the electronic supplementary material, figure S1, for a breakdown of final sample sizes).


Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

van der Bijl W, Thyselius M, Kotrschal A, Kolm N - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2015)

Overview of positional data during trials with a model predator, presented as statistical heat maps. First row (a) shows the overall result of each sex, second row (b) splits this up per brain size, and the third row (c) divides the brain size results for females up into the different shoal sizes. Each cell (pixel) in the heat maps shows the p-value of a non-parametric test. In the orange and blue maps, we tested against the median density to visualize the areas of the tanks that were visited more or less than expected. The pink and green maps show the statistical comparison between groups; i.e. males and females or small- and large-brained individuals. Black rectangles indicate predator position. Numbers between parentheses denote sample sizes. Note the nonlinear axis in the legend.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528528&req=5

RSPB20151132F2: Overview of positional data during trials with a model predator, presented as statistical heat maps. First row (a) shows the overall result of each sex, second row (b) splits this up per brain size, and the third row (c) divides the brain size results for females up into the different shoal sizes. Each cell (pixel) in the heat maps shows the p-value of a non-parametric test. In the orange and blue maps, we tested against the median density to visualize the areas of the tanks that were visited more or less than expected. The pink and green maps show the statistical comparison between groups; i.e. males and females or small- and large-brained individuals. Black rectangles indicate predator position. Numbers between parentheses denote sample sizes. Note the nonlinear axis in the legend.
Mentions: We tested the two sexes, two brain sizes and three replicated selection lines in separate trials. As guppies often form small shoals in the field, and the predator response may vary by group size, we used singletons, pairs and shoals of four. The sexes, brain sizes and shoal sizes combined to a total of 12 treatment groups in a fully crossed design. Within each of those treatments, we tested 12 groups, for a total of 144 groups, using 336 fish (112 per replicate, see figure 2 and the electronic supplementary material, figure S1, for a breakdown of final sample sizes).

Bottom Line: Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males.We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response.Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology/Ethology, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 18B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden wouter.van.der.bijl@zoologi.su.se.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus