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Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

van der Bijl W, Thyselius M, Kotrschal A, Kolm N - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males.We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response.Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology/Ethology, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 18B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden wouter.van.der.bijl@zoologi.su.se.

No MeSH data available.


Parameters of inspection behaviour for the different treatments presented as boxplots, indicating the median and quartiles with whiskers reaching up to 1.5 times the interquartile range. The violin plot outlines illustrate kernel probability density, i.e. the width of the shaded area represents the proportion of the data located there. Significance is based on LMMs, see text and table 1 (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 and ***p < 0.001). (a) Total time spent inspecting the predator model per fish in the shoal. (b) Total number of inspections per shoal. (c) Average duration of those inspections. Note the use of log10 scales.
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RSPB20151132F1: Parameters of inspection behaviour for the different treatments presented as boxplots, indicating the median and quartiles with whiskers reaching up to 1.5 times the interquartile range. The violin plot outlines illustrate kernel probability density, i.e. the width of the shaded area represents the proportion of the data located there. Significance is based on LMMs, see text and table 1 (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 and ***p < 0.001). (a) Total time spent inspecting the predator model per fish in the shoal. (b) Total number of inspections per shoal. (c) Average duration of those inspections. Note the use of log10 scales.

Mentions: Females from small- and large-brained lines differed significantly in their propensity to perform predator inspections (figure 1 and table 1). Large-brained females spent much less time performing inspections than small-brained females (figure 1a and table 1), and this was true for all shoal sizes. This difference resulted from large-brained females performing both fewer (figure 1b and table 1) and shorter inspections (figure 1c and table 1). This effect of brain size in females was not the result of a difference in general activity, as the average speed was not affected by brain size (LMM: F1,8.13 = 0.16, p = 0.70). We observed no effect of brain size on male inspection behaviour (figure 1 and table 1). In females, larger shoals performed more inspections, but mean inspection duration and the time inspecting per fish were not affected by group size (table 1; electronic supplementary material, figure S4).Figure 1.


Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

van der Bijl W, Thyselius M, Kotrschal A, Kolm N - Proc. Biol. Sci. (2015)

Parameters of inspection behaviour for the different treatments presented as boxplots, indicating the median and quartiles with whiskers reaching up to 1.5 times the interquartile range. The violin plot outlines illustrate kernel probability density, i.e. the width of the shaded area represents the proportion of the data located there. Significance is based on LMMs, see text and table 1 (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 and ***p < 0.001). (a) Total time spent inspecting the predator model per fish in the shoal. (b) Total number of inspections per shoal. (c) Average duration of those inspections. Note the use of log10 scales.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528528&req=5

RSPB20151132F1: Parameters of inspection behaviour for the different treatments presented as boxplots, indicating the median and quartiles with whiskers reaching up to 1.5 times the interquartile range. The violin plot outlines illustrate kernel probability density, i.e. the width of the shaded area represents the proportion of the data located there. Significance is based on LMMs, see text and table 1 (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 and ***p < 0.001). (a) Total time spent inspecting the predator model per fish in the shoal. (b) Total number of inspections per shoal. (c) Average duration of those inspections. Note the use of log10 scales.
Mentions: Females from small- and large-brained lines differed significantly in their propensity to perform predator inspections (figure 1 and table 1). Large-brained females spent much less time performing inspections than small-brained females (figure 1a and table 1), and this was true for all shoal sizes. This difference resulted from large-brained females performing both fewer (figure 1b and table 1) and shorter inspections (figure 1c and table 1). This effect of brain size in females was not the result of a difference in general activity, as the average speed was not affected by brain size (LMM: F1,8.13 = 0.16, p = 0.70). We observed no effect of brain size on male inspection behaviour (figure 1 and table 1). In females, larger shoals performed more inspections, but mean inspection duration and the time inspecting per fish were not affected by group size (table 1; electronic supplementary material, figure S4).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males.We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response.Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology/Ethology, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 18B, Stockholm 10691, Sweden wouter.van.der.bijl@zoologi.su.se.

No MeSH data available.