Limits...
Interactions between multiple helminths and the gut microbiota in wild rodents.

Kreisinger J, Bastien G, Hauffe HC, Marchesi J, Perkins SE - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: In general, helminth presence is linked with high microbiota diversity, which may confer health benefits to the host.Within our wild rodent system variation in the composition and abundance of gut microbial taxa associated with helminths was specific to each helminth species and occurred both up- and downstream of a given helminth's niche (gut position).Free-living rodents with a diverse helminth community offer a useful model system that enables both correlative (this study) and manipulative inference to elucidate helminth-microbiota interactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Centre for Research and Innovation, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 S. Michele all'Adige, TN, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The gut microbiota is vital to host health and, as such, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms altering its composition and diversity. Intestinal helminths are host immunomodulators and have evolved both temporally and spatially in close association with the gut microbiota, resulting in potential mechanistic interplay. Host-helminth and host-microbiota interactions are comparatively well-examined, unlike microbiota-helminth relationships, which typically focus on experimental infection with a single helminth species in laboratory animals. Here, in addition to a review of the literature on helminth-microbiota interactions, we examined empirically the association between microbiota diversity and composition and natural infection of multiple helminth species in wild mice (Apodemus flavicollis), using 16S rRNA gene catalogues (metataxonomics). In general, helminth presence is linked with high microbiota diversity, which may confer health benefits to the host. Within our wild rodent system variation in the composition and abundance of gut microbial taxa associated with helminths was specific to each helminth species and occurred both up- and downstream of a given helminth's niche (gut position). The most pronounced helminth-microbiota association was between the presence of tapeworms in the small intestine and increased S24-7 (Bacteroidetes) family in the stomach. Helminths clearly have the potential to alter gut homeostasis. Free-living rodents with a diverse helminth community offer a useful model system that enables both correlative (this study) and manipulative inference to elucidate helminth-microbiota interactions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ordination plots of the association between predicted metagenomic content and helminth presence, based on Bray–Curtis dissimilarities. Distribution of samples along the first two db-RDA axes (i.e. CAP1 and CAP2) and associated proportion of variation are shown. The presence of individual helminths is indicated by coloured segments surrounding the data points (see the figure key). Significant effects of the helminths are indicated by bold arrows (permutation-based p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528493&req=5

RSTB20140295F5: Ordination plots of the association between predicted metagenomic content and helminth presence, based on Bray–Curtis dissimilarities. Distribution of samples along the first two db-RDA axes (i.e. CAP1 and CAP2) and associated proportion of variation are shown. The presence of individual helminths is indicated by coloured segments surrounding the data points (see the figure key). Significant effects of the helminths are indicated by bold arrows (permutation-based p < 0.05).

Mentions: A global model using constrained ordination (db-RDA) of the entire gut revealed a significant effect on the predicted metagenome composition defined by COG categories owing to the presence of H. polygyrus and Hymenolepis spp., although the proportion of variance explained was low (adjusted R2 = 0.019 and 0.015, figure 5 and table 2). At a gut-niche level, H. polygyrus and Hymenolepis spp. presence were significantly associated with the functional variation of the caecal and stomach metagenomes, respectively, but Syphacia. spp. showed no association with any gut section (table 2). We also detected a significant effect of H. polygyrus abundance across the whole gut, but not for Hymenolepis spp. and Syphacia spp. abundance (table 2).Figure 5.


Interactions between multiple helminths and the gut microbiota in wild rodents.

Kreisinger J, Bastien G, Hauffe HC, Marchesi J, Perkins SE - Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. (2015)

Ordination plots of the association between predicted metagenomic content and helminth presence, based on Bray–Curtis dissimilarities. Distribution of samples along the first two db-RDA axes (i.e. CAP1 and CAP2) and associated proportion of variation are shown. The presence of individual helminths is indicated by coloured segments surrounding the data points (see the figure key). Significant effects of the helminths are indicated by bold arrows (permutation-based p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528493&req=5

RSTB20140295F5: Ordination plots of the association between predicted metagenomic content and helminth presence, based on Bray–Curtis dissimilarities. Distribution of samples along the first two db-RDA axes (i.e. CAP1 and CAP2) and associated proportion of variation are shown. The presence of individual helminths is indicated by coloured segments surrounding the data points (see the figure key). Significant effects of the helminths are indicated by bold arrows (permutation-based p < 0.05).
Mentions: A global model using constrained ordination (db-RDA) of the entire gut revealed a significant effect on the predicted metagenome composition defined by COG categories owing to the presence of H. polygyrus and Hymenolepis spp., although the proportion of variance explained was low (adjusted R2 = 0.019 and 0.015, figure 5 and table 2). At a gut-niche level, H. polygyrus and Hymenolepis spp. presence were significantly associated with the functional variation of the caecal and stomach metagenomes, respectively, but Syphacia. spp. showed no association with any gut section (table 2). We also detected a significant effect of H. polygyrus abundance across the whole gut, but not for Hymenolepis spp. and Syphacia spp. abundance (table 2).Figure 5.

Bottom Line: In general, helminth presence is linked with high microbiota diversity, which may confer health benefits to the host.Within our wild rodent system variation in the composition and abundance of gut microbial taxa associated with helminths was specific to each helminth species and occurred both up- and downstream of a given helminth's niche (gut position).Free-living rodents with a diverse helminth community offer a useful model system that enables both correlative (this study) and manipulative inference to elucidate helminth-microbiota interactions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Centre for Research and Innovation, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 S. Michele all'Adige, TN, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The gut microbiota is vital to host health and, as such, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms altering its composition and diversity. Intestinal helminths are host immunomodulators and have evolved both temporally and spatially in close association with the gut microbiota, resulting in potential mechanistic interplay. Host-helminth and host-microbiota interactions are comparatively well-examined, unlike microbiota-helminth relationships, which typically focus on experimental infection with a single helminth species in laboratory animals. Here, in addition to a review of the literature on helminth-microbiota interactions, we examined empirically the association between microbiota diversity and composition and natural infection of multiple helminth species in wild mice (Apodemus flavicollis), using 16S rRNA gene catalogues (metataxonomics). In general, helminth presence is linked with high microbiota diversity, which may confer health benefits to the host. Within our wild rodent system variation in the composition and abundance of gut microbial taxa associated with helminths was specific to each helminth species and occurred both up- and downstream of a given helminth's niche (gut position). The most pronounced helminth-microbiota association was between the presence of tapeworms in the small intestine and increased S24-7 (Bacteroidetes) family in the stomach. Helminths clearly have the potential to alter gut homeostasis. Free-living rodents with a diverse helminth community offer a useful model system that enables both correlative (this study) and manipulative inference to elucidate helminth-microbiota interactions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus