Limits...
A sex allocation cost to polyandry in a parasitoid wasp.

Boulton RA, Shuker DM - Biol. Lett. (2015)

Bottom Line: The costs and benefits of polyandry are central to understanding the near-ubiquity of female multiple mating.Here, we present evidence of a novel cost of polyandry: disrupted sex allocation.Furthermore, because males benefit from female-biased offspring sex ratios, harassment of ovipositing females also creates a novel cost of that harassment for males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK rb78@st-andrews.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The costs and benefits of polyandry are central to understanding the near-ubiquity of female multiple mating. Here, we present evidence of a novel cost of polyandry: disrupted sex allocation. In Nasonia vitripennis, a species that is monandrous in the wild but engages in polyandry under laboratory culture conditions, sexual harassment during oviposition results in increased production of sons under conditions that favour female-biased sex ratios. In addition, females more likely to re-mate under harassment produce the least female-biased sex ratios, and these females are unable to mitigate this cost by increasing offspring production. Our results therefore argue that polyandry does not serve to mitigate the costs of harassment (convenience polyandry) in Nasonia. Furthermore, because males benefit from female-biased offspring sex ratios, harassment of ovipositing females also creates a novel cost of that harassment for males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Offspring sex ratio (proportion of offspring that were male) produced by females that either re-mated or resisted the first male that courted them when exposed to males in the harassment treatments. Females either did (open bars) or did not (filled bars) experience post-copulatory courtship after their initial mating. Error bars are binomial CIs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528469&req=5

RSBL20150205F2: Offspring sex ratio (proportion of offspring that were male) produced by females that either re-mated or resisted the first male that courted them when exposed to males in the harassment treatments. Females either did (open bars) or did not (filled bars) experience post-copulatory courtship after their initial mating. Error bars are binomial CIs.

Mentions: Females observed to re-mate with the first male that courted them (under harassment) laid a less female-biased sex ratio than females that resisted (although this was only marginally significant: F1,84 = 4.02, p = 0.048; figure 2). In addition, among females which had the opportunity to re-mate, those that did not receive post-copulatory courtship produced less female-biased sex ratios as before (F1,87 = 5.06, p = 0.03), and the effects of observed re-mating and post-copulatory courtship were again independent of each other (interaction: F1,87 = 0.11, p = 0.74; figure 2).FigureĀ 2.


A sex allocation cost to polyandry in a parasitoid wasp.

Boulton RA, Shuker DM - Biol. Lett. (2015)

Offspring sex ratio (proportion of offspring that were male) produced by females that either re-mated or resisted the first male that courted them when exposed to males in the harassment treatments. Females either did (open bars) or did not (filled bars) experience post-copulatory courtship after their initial mating. Error bars are binomial CIs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528469&req=5

RSBL20150205F2: Offspring sex ratio (proportion of offspring that were male) produced by females that either re-mated or resisted the first male that courted them when exposed to males in the harassment treatments. Females either did (open bars) or did not (filled bars) experience post-copulatory courtship after their initial mating. Error bars are binomial CIs.
Mentions: Females observed to re-mate with the first male that courted them (under harassment) laid a less female-biased sex ratio than females that resisted (although this was only marginally significant: F1,84 = 4.02, p = 0.048; figure 2). In addition, among females which had the opportunity to re-mate, those that did not receive post-copulatory courtship produced less female-biased sex ratios as before (F1,87 = 5.06, p = 0.03), and the effects of observed re-mating and post-copulatory courtship were again independent of each other (interaction: F1,87 = 0.11, p = 0.74; figure 2).FigureĀ 2.

Bottom Line: The costs and benefits of polyandry are central to understanding the near-ubiquity of female multiple mating.Here, we present evidence of a novel cost of polyandry: disrupted sex allocation.Furthermore, because males benefit from female-biased offspring sex ratios, harassment of ovipositing females also creates a novel cost of that harassment for males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK rb78@st-andrews.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The costs and benefits of polyandry are central to understanding the near-ubiquity of female multiple mating. Here, we present evidence of a novel cost of polyandry: disrupted sex allocation. In Nasonia vitripennis, a species that is monandrous in the wild but engages in polyandry under laboratory culture conditions, sexual harassment during oviposition results in increased production of sons under conditions that favour female-biased sex ratios. In addition, females more likely to re-mate under harassment produce the least female-biased sex ratios, and these females are unable to mitigate this cost by increasing offspring production. Our results therefore argue that polyandry does not serve to mitigate the costs of harassment (convenience polyandry) in Nasonia. Furthermore, because males benefit from female-biased offspring sex ratios, harassment of ovipositing females also creates a novel cost of that harassment for males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus