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Evidence for a Common Origin of Homomorphic and Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes in Distinct Spinacia Species.

Fujito S, Takahata S, Suzuki R, Hoshino Y, Ohmido N, Onodera Y - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, nuclear and chloroplast sequences from 21 accessions of Spinacia germplasm and six spinach cultivars or lines were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to define the relationships among the three species.Group 2 also was characterized by a sexual dimorphism in inflorescence structure, which was not observed in Group 1.Our data suggest that the Spinacia genus may serve as a good model for investigation of evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs from ancestral homomorphic pairs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, N-9, W-9, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow cytometry estimates of relative nuclear DNA amounts in Spinacia species. The vertical axis represents relative fluorescence intensity against an internal reference standard, Beta vulgaris L. TK81-MS. Error bars represent standard deviations (N = 5).
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fig2: Flow cytometry estimates of relative nuclear DNA amounts in Spinacia species. The vertical axis represents relative fluorescence intensity against an internal reference standard, Beta vulgaris L. TK81-MS. Error bars represent standard deviations (N = 5).

Mentions: A heteromorphic sex chromosome pair can result in significant differences in the nuclear DNA content between males and females. We measured the DNA content of a single male and female from each of 13 accessions or cultivars from Group 1 and Group 2 using flow cytometry (with five replicated measurements per individual). Relative fluorescence intensity of DAPI-stained nuclei from samples in Group 1 and Group 2 against an internal reference standard (Beta vulgaris L. TK81-MS) is summarized in Figure 2. Relative fluorescence intensities were almost invariable (∼1.36) among individuals from the 10 accessions and cultivars classified as Group 1, irrespective of sex, suggesting that there is no obvious size difference between X and Y chromosomes in Group 1 plants.


Evidence for a Common Origin of Homomorphic and Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes in Distinct Spinacia Species.

Fujito S, Takahata S, Suzuki R, Hoshino Y, Ohmido N, Onodera Y - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Flow cytometry estimates of relative nuclear DNA amounts in Spinacia species. The vertical axis represents relative fluorescence intensity against an internal reference standard, Beta vulgaris L. TK81-MS. Error bars represent standard deviations (N = 5).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528323&req=5

fig2: Flow cytometry estimates of relative nuclear DNA amounts in Spinacia species. The vertical axis represents relative fluorescence intensity against an internal reference standard, Beta vulgaris L. TK81-MS. Error bars represent standard deviations (N = 5).
Mentions: A heteromorphic sex chromosome pair can result in significant differences in the nuclear DNA content between males and females. We measured the DNA content of a single male and female from each of 13 accessions or cultivars from Group 1 and Group 2 using flow cytometry (with five replicated measurements per individual). Relative fluorescence intensity of DAPI-stained nuclei from samples in Group 1 and Group 2 against an internal reference standard (Beta vulgaris L. TK81-MS) is summarized in Figure 2. Relative fluorescence intensities were almost invariable (∼1.36) among individuals from the 10 accessions and cultivars classified as Group 1, irrespective of sex, suggesting that there is no obvious size difference between X and Y chromosomes in Group 1 plants.

Bottom Line: In this study, nuclear and chloroplast sequences from 21 accessions of Spinacia germplasm and six spinach cultivars or lines were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to define the relationships among the three species.Group 2 also was characterized by a sexual dimorphism in inflorescence structure, which was not observed in Group 1.Our data suggest that the Spinacia genus may serve as a good model for investigation of evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs from ancestral homomorphic pairs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, N-9, W-9, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus