Limits...
Sorting swimmers shoulders: An observational study on swimmers that presented to a shoulder surgeon.

Butler D, Funk L, Mackenzie TA, Herrington LC - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: No significant association was identified between swimming stroke and type of injury.Swimmers with impingement did not require arthroscopy, and with nonoperative management had a mean time to return to swimming of 1.6 months.All labral tears required arthroscopic labral repair, with these swimmers having a mean time of 2.9 months postsurgery to return to swimming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Manchester, School of Medicine, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Context: It is common for swimmers to suffer shoulder injuries resulting in a wealth of research focusing on the causes and types of injury. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding current management for shoulder injuries in swimmers.

Aims: To investigate the diagnosis, subsequent management, and the return to swimming outcomes for swimmers presenting to an orthopedic practice.

Settings and design: Retrospective cohort study of competitive swimmers presenting to an orthopedic practice.

Materials and methods: The diagnosis, subsequent management, and the return to swimming outcomes were analyzed for 14 swimmers whose injuries were managed by a shoulder surgeon.

Statistical analysis used: Descriptive analysis.

Results: No significant association was identified between swimming stroke and type of injury. The majority of swimmers had good scapula rhythm, with no visible dyskinesis, including those with impingement. Swimmers with impingement did not require arthroscopy, and with nonoperative management had a mean time to return to swimming of 1.6 months. All labral tears required arthroscopic labral repair, with these swimmers having a mean time of 2.9 months postsurgery to return to swimming.

Conclusion: The study demonstrated that an accurate diagnosis, and appropriate choice of nonoperative and surgical treatments lead to reassuring outcomes for swimmers suffering from shoulder injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Beighton hypermobility scores
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528289&req=5

Figure 2: Beighton hypermobility scores

Mentions: Scapular control was observed in ten swimmers. Five (50%) were recorded as having “good scapular control” (poor resting position of the scapula, but with no scapular dyskinesis on motion), two (20%) had “excellent scapular control” (good scapula resting position with no scapular dyskinesis on motion), and the remaining three swimmers (30%) had “scapular dysrthymia” on examination, as shown in Figure 1. Eight of the 14 swimmers had Beighton Scores recorded. Based on the suggested normal threshold of joint laxity in a young athlete of 4-6,[10] three out of eight (37%) athletes tested by the Beighton score had generalized hypermobility. Beighton scores for each swimmer are illustrated in Figure 2. All swimmers with impingement signs received conservative treatment, four received physiotherapy alone, and three had intra-articular corticosteroid injections. As illustrated in Figure 3, six swimmers had surgery. Five with labral pathology underwent arthroscopic labral repair surgery inclusive of: Anterior capsular plication, SLAP repair, capsular shrinkage, Bankart repair, and HAGL repair. The sixth swimmer who underwent surgery had anterior instability and had an arthroscopic anterior capsular shrinkage. There was no outcome data for three swimmers, because one had retired before receiving treatment, another retired as a result of the injury, and one did not attend follow-up appointments. The mean time taken for swimmers who received conservative management inclusive of both physiotherapy and intra-articular injections was 1.6 months compared with 2.9 months in surgical patients Figure 4.


Sorting swimmers shoulders: An observational study on swimmers that presented to a shoulder surgeon.

Butler D, Funk L, Mackenzie TA, Herrington LC - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jul-Sep)

Beighton hypermobility scores
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528289&req=5

Figure 2: Beighton hypermobility scores
Mentions: Scapular control was observed in ten swimmers. Five (50%) were recorded as having “good scapular control” (poor resting position of the scapula, but with no scapular dyskinesis on motion), two (20%) had “excellent scapular control” (good scapula resting position with no scapular dyskinesis on motion), and the remaining three swimmers (30%) had “scapular dysrthymia” on examination, as shown in Figure 1. Eight of the 14 swimmers had Beighton Scores recorded. Based on the suggested normal threshold of joint laxity in a young athlete of 4-6,[10] three out of eight (37%) athletes tested by the Beighton score had generalized hypermobility. Beighton scores for each swimmer are illustrated in Figure 2. All swimmers with impingement signs received conservative treatment, four received physiotherapy alone, and three had intra-articular corticosteroid injections. As illustrated in Figure 3, six swimmers had surgery. Five with labral pathology underwent arthroscopic labral repair surgery inclusive of: Anterior capsular plication, SLAP repair, capsular shrinkage, Bankart repair, and HAGL repair. The sixth swimmer who underwent surgery had anterior instability and had an arthroscopic anterior capsular shrinkage. There was no outcome data for three swimmers, because one had retired before receiving treatment, another retired as a result of the injury, and one did not attend follow-up appointments. The mean time taken for swimmers who received conservative management inclusive of both physiotherapy and intra-articular injections was 1.6 months compared with 2.9 months in surgical patients Figure 4.

Bottom Line: No significant association was identified between swimming stroke and type of injury.Swimmers with impingement did not require arthroscopy, and with nonoperative management had a mean time to return to swimming of 1.6 months.All labral tears required arthroscopic labral repair, with these swimmers having a mean time of 2.9 months postsurgery to return to swimming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Manchester, School of Medicine, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Context: It is common for swimmers to suffer shoulder injuries resulting in a wealth of research focusing on the causes and types of injury. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding current management for shoulder injuries in swimmers.

Aims: To investigate the diagnosis, subsequent management, and the return to swimming outcomes for swimmers presenting to an orthopedic practice.

Settings and design: Retrospective cohort study of competitive swimmers presenting to an orthopedic practice.

Materials and methods: The diagnosis, subsequent management, and the return to swimming outcomes were analyzed for 14 swimmers whose injuries were managed by a shoulder surgeon.

Statistical analysis used: Descriptive analysis.

Results: No significant association was identified between swimming stroke and type of injury. The majority of swimmers had good scapula rhythm, with no visible dyskinesis, including those with impingement. Swimmers with impingement did not require arthroscopy, and with nonoperative management had a mean time to return to swimming of 1.6 months. All labral tears required arthroscopic labral repair, with these swimmers having a mean time of 2.9 months postsurgery to return to swimming.

Conclusion: The study demonstrated that an accurate diagnosis, and appropriate choice of nonoperative and surgical treatments lead to reassuring outcomes for swimmers suffering from shoulder injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus