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Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions: Clinical and anatomic follow-up.

Trantalis JN, Sohmer S, More KD, Nelson AA, Wong B, Dyke CH, Thornton GM, Boorman RS, Lo IK - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: Two-tailed paired t-test were used to determine significant differences in preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes scores.At a mean follow-up of 54-month, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index (ASES) scores improved from 52.1 preoperatively to 86.1 postoperatively (P < 0.0001) and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores from 7.7 to 10.6 (P < 0.0002).MRA results do not necessarily correlate with clinical outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Concord Public Hospital, Concord, NSW 2137, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Aims: The aim was to evaluate the clinical and anatomic outcome of arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions.

Materials and methods: The senior author performed isolated repairs of 25 type II SLAP lesions in 25 patients with a mean age of 40.0 ± 12 years. All tears were repaired using standard arthroscopic suture anchor repair to bone. All patients were reviewed using a standardized clinical examination by a blinded, independent observer, and using several shoulder outcome measures. Patients were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram at a minimum of 1-year postoperatively.

Statistical analysis used: Two-tailed paired t-test were used to determine significant differences in preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes scores. In addition, a Fisher's exact test was used.

Results: At a mean follow-up of 54-month, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index (ASES) scores improved from 52.1 preoperatively to 86.1 postoperatively (P < 0.0001) and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores from 7.7 to 10.6 (P < 0.0002). Twenty-two out of the 25 patients (88%) stated that they would have surgery again. Of the 21 patients who had postoperative magnetic resonance imaging arthrographys (MRAs), 9 patients (43%) demonstrated dye tracking between the labrum bone interface suggestive of a recurrent tear and 12 patients (57%) had a completely intact repair. There was no significant difference in ASES, SST, and patient satisfaction scores in patients with recurrent or intact repairs.

Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions demonstrated improvements in clinical outcomes. However, MRA imaging demonstrated 43% of patients with recurrent tears. MRA results do not necessarily correlate with clinical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

T1-weighted, fat-suppressed, coronal oblique magnetic resonance imaging arthrography images demonstrating a patient with an intact superior labrum following type II SLAP repair. Note the absence of gadolinium between the superior labrum and glenoid postoperatively
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Figure 4: T1-weighted, fat-suppressed, coronal oblique magnetic resonance imaging arthrography images demonstrating a patient with an intact superior labrum following type II SLAP repair. Note the absence of gadolinium between the superior labrum and glenoid postoperatively

Mentions: Intact: Minimal to no dye leakage (and/or improvement when compared to the preoperative imaging) under the labrum [Figure 4].


Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions: Clinical and anatomic follow-up.

Trantalis JN, Sohmer S, More KD, Nelson AA, Wong B, Dyke CH, Thornton GM, Boorman RS, Lo IK - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jul-Sep)

T1-weighted, fat-suppressed, coronal oblique magnetic resonance imaging arthrography images demonstrating a patient with an intact superior labrum following type II SLAP repair. Note the absence of gadolinium between the superior labrum and glenoid postoperatively
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528287&req=5

Figure 4: T1-weighted, fat-suppressed, coronal oblique magnetic resonance imaging arthrography images demonstrating a patient with an intact superior labrum following type II SLAP repair. Note the absence of gadolinium between the superior labrum and glenoid postoperatively
Mentions: Intact: Minimal to no dye leakage (and/or improvement when compared to the preoperative imaging) under the labrum [Figure 4].

Bottom Line: Two-tailed paired t-test were used to determine significant differences in preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes scores.At a mean follow-up of 54-month, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index (ASES) scores improved from 52.1 preoperatively to 86.1 postoperatively (P < 0.0001) and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores from 7.7 to 10.6 (P < 0.0002).MRA results do not necessarily correlate with clinical outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Concord Public Hospital, Concord, NSW 2137, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Aims: The aim was to evaluate the clinical and anatomic outcome of arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions.

Materials and methods: The senior author performed isolated repairs of 25 type II SLAP lesions in 25 patients with a mean age of 40.0 ± 12 years. All tears were repaired using standard arthroscopic suture anchor repair to bone. All patients were reviewed using a standardized clinical examination by a blinded, independent observer, and using several shoulder outcome measures. Patients were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram at a minimum of 1-year postoperatively.

Statistical analysis used: Two-tailed paired t-test were used to determine significant differences in preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes scores. In addition, a Fisher's exact test was used.

Results: At a mean follow-up of 54-month, the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index (ASES) scores improved from 52.1 preoperatively to 86.1 postoperatively (P < 0.0001) and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores from 7.7 to 10.6 (P < 0.0002). Twenty-two out of the 25 patients (88%) stated that they would have surgery again. Of the 21 patients who had postoperative magnetic resonance imaging arthrographys (MRAs), 9 patients (43%) demonstrated dye tracking between the labrum bone interface suggestive of a recurrent tear and 12 patients (57%) had a completely intact repair. There was no significant difference in ASES, SST, and patient satisfaction scores in patients with recurrent or intact repairs.

Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions demonstrated improvements in clinical outcomes. However, MRA imaging demonstrated 43% of patients with recurrent tears. MRA results do not necessarily correlate with clinical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus