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First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae).

López-Antoñanzas R, Knoll F, Maksoud S, Azar D - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily.A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction.As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom [2] Departamento de Paleobiología, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-CSIC, Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis.

No MeSH data available.


Upper cheek teeth of Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp.(A–C) Zahleh 7, right DP4. (A) occlusal view; (B) lingual view; (C) labial view. (D) Zahleh 6, left P4, occlusal view. (E–G) Zahleh 26, left M1. (E) occlusal view; (F) lingual view; (G) labial view. (H–J) Zahleh 25, right M1. (H) occlusal view; (I) lingual view; (J) labial view. (K–M) Zahleh 47, right M1. (K) occlusal view; (L) lingual view; (M) labial view. (N–P) Zahleh 46, right M2. (N) occlusal view; (O) lingual view; (P) labial view. (Q) Zahleh 23, left M2, occlusal view. (R) Zahleh 12, left M2, occlusal view. 3D rendering from X-ray microtomography (μCT scan). Scale bar equals 1 mm.
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f3: Upper cheek teeth of Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp.(A–C) Zahleh 7, right DP4. (A) occlusal view; (B) lingual view; (C) labial view. (D) Zahleh 6, left P4, occlusal view. (E–G) Zahleh 26, left M1. (E) occlusal view; (F) lingual view; (G) labial view. (H–J) Zahleh 25, right M1. (H) occlusal view; (I) lingual view; (J) labial view. (K–M) Zahleh 47, right M1. (K) occlusal view; (L) lingual view; (M) labial view. (N–P) Zahleh 46, right M2. (N) occlusal view; (O) lingual view; (P) labial view. (Q) Zahleh 23, left M2, occlusal view. (R) Zahleh 12, left M2, occlusal view. 3D rendering from X-ray microtomography (μCT scan). Scale bar equals 1 mm.

Mentions: Proafricanomys libanensis nov. sp. (Figs 2, 3, 4)


First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae).

López-Antoñanzas R, Knoll F, Maksoud S, Azar D - Sci Rep (2015)

Upper cheek teeth of Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp.(A–C) Zahleh 7, right DP4. (A) occlusal view; (B) lingual view; (C) labial view. (D) Zahleh 6, left P4, occlusal view. (E–G) Zahleh 26, left M1. (E) occlusal view; (F) lingual view; (G) labial view. (H–J) Zahleh 25, right M1. (H) occlusal view; (I) lingual view; (J) labial view. (K–M) Zahleh 47, right M1. (K) occlusal view; (L) lingual view; (M) labial view. (N–P) Zahleh 46, right M2. (N) occlusal view; (O) lingual view; (P) labial view. (Q) Zahleh 23, left M2, occlusal view. (R) Zahleh 12, left M2, occlusal view. 3D rendering from X-ray microtomography (μCT scan). Scale bar equals 1 mm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528195&req=5

f3: Upper cheek teeth of Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp.(A–C) Zahleh 7, right DP4. (A) occlusal view; (B) lingual view; (C) labial view. (D) Zahleh 6, left P4, occlusal view. (E–G) Zahleh 26, left M1. (E) occlusal view; (F) lingual view; (G) labial view. (H–J) Zahleh 25, right M1. (H) occlusal view; (I) lingual view; (J) labial view. (K–M) Zahleh 47, right M1. (K) occlusal view; (L) lingual view; (M) labial view. (N–P) Zahleh 46, right M2. (N) occlusal view; (O) lingual view; (P) labial view. (Q) Zahleh 23, left M2, occlusal view. (R) Zahleh 12, left M2, occlusal view. 3D rendering from X-ray microtomography (μCT scan). Scale bar equals 1 mm.
Mentions: Proafricanomys libanensis nov. sp. (Figs 2, 3, 4)

Bottom Line: Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily.A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction.As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom [2] Departamento de Paleobiología, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-CSIC, Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis.

No MeSH data available.