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Co-evolution in a landrace meta-population: two closely related pathogens interacting with the same host can lead to different adaptive outcomes.

Rau D, Rodriguez M, Leonarda Murgia M, Balmas V, Bitocchi E, Bellucci E, Nanni L, Attene G, Papa R - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We demonstrated that two closely related pathogens with very similar niche specialisation and life-styles can give rise to different co-evolutionary outcomes on the same host.Moreover, data suggested latitudinal clines of host resistance and that different ecological conditions can result in differential selective pressures at different sites.Our data are of interest for on-farm conservation of plant genetic resources, as also in establishing efficient breeding programs and strategies for deployment of resistance genes of P. teres.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sezione di Agronomia, Coltivazioni Erbacee e Genetica, Dipartimento di Agraria, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Sassari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We examined the local adaptation patterns in a system comprising several interconnected heterogeneous plant populations from which populations of two phylogenetically closely related pathogens were also sampled. The host is Hordeum vulgare (cultivated barley); the pathogens are Pyrenophora teres f. teres (net form) and Pyrenophora teres f. maculata (spot form), the causal agents of barley net blotch. We integrated two approaches, the comparison between the population structures of the host and the pathogens, and a cross-inoculation test. We demonstrated that two closely related pathogens with very similar niche specialisation and life-styles can give rise to different co-evolutionary outcomes on the same host. Indeed, we detected local adaptation for the net form of the pathogen but not for the spot form. We also provided evidence that an a-priori well-known resistance quantitative-trait-locus on barley chromosome 6H is involved in the co-evolutionary 'arms race' between the plant and the net-form pathogen. Moreover, data suggested latitudinal clines of host resistance and that different ecological conditions can result in differential selective pressures at different sites. Our data are of interest for on-farm conservation of plant genetic resources, as also in establishing efficient breeding programs and strategies for deployment of resistance genes of P. teres.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between size of the necrotic lesions on the barley lines and latitude of provenance.Calculations are given separately for the Ptt (top) and the Ptm (bottom) of P. teres.
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f4: Correlation between size of the necrotic lesions on the barley lines and latitude of provenance.Calculations are given separately for the Ptt (top) and the Ptm (bottom) of P. teres.

Mentions: Here, a significant variation in the mean resistance among the barley populations was observed, which was true for both the Ptt and Ptm (Table 4). Moreover, the resistance of the host populations increased when moving from the south to the north of the island; i.e., there was a latitudinal cline in the host genetic resistance (Fig. 4). This was true for both the Ptt and Ptm pathogens, albeit there was a stronger effect for the Ptm (Fig. 4). Although we detected a statistically significant difference in the mean aggressivity among the Ptt and Ptm pathogen populations (Table 4), there was no associated latitudinal pattern (Figure S1). Moreover, there was no significant correlation between the mean resistance of the host populations and the mean aggressivity of the associated pathogen samples (P > 0.05).


Co-evolution in a landrace meta-population: two closely related pathogens interacting with the same host can lead to different adaptive outcomes.

Rau D, Rodriguez M, Leonarda Murgia M, Balmas V, Bitocchi E, Bellucci E, Nanni L, Attene G, Papa R - Sci Rep (2015)

Correlation between size of the necrotic lesions on the barley lines and latitude of provenance.Calculations are given separately for the Ptt (top) and the Ptm (bottom) of P. teres.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528193&req=5

f4: Correlation between size of the necrotic lesions on the barley lines and latitude of provenance.Calculations are given separately for the Ptt (top) and the Ptm (bottom) of P. teres.
Mentions: Here, a significant variation in the mean resistance among the barley populations was observed, which was true for both the Ptt and Ptm (Table 4). Moreover, the resistance of the host populations increased when moving from the south to the north of the island; i.e., there was a latitudinal cline in the host genetic resistance (Fig. 4). This was true for both the Ptt and Ptm pathogens, albeit there was a stronger effect for the Ptm (Fig. 4). Although we detected a statistically significant difference in the mean aggressivity among the Ptt and Ptm pathogen populations (Table 4), there was no associated latitudinal pattern (Figure S1). Moreover, there was no significant correlation between the mean resistance of the host populations and the mean aggressivity of the associated pathogen samples (P > 0.05).

Bottom Line: We demonstrated that two closely related pathogens with very similar niche specialisation and life-styles can give rise to different co-evolutionary outcomes on the same host.Moreover, data suggested latitudinal clines of host resistance and that different ecological conditions can result in differential selective pressures at different sites.Our data are of interest for on-farm conservation of plant genetic resources, as also in establishing efficient breeding programs and strategies for deployment of resistance genes of P. teres.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sezione di Agronomia, Coltivazioni Erbacee e Genetica, Dipartimento di Agraria, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Sassari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We examined the local adaptation patterns in a system comprising several interconnected heterogeneous plant populations from which populations of two phylogenetically closely related pathogens were also sampled. The host is Hordeum vulgare (cultivated barley); the pathogens are Pyrenophora teres f. teres (net form) and Pyrenophora teres f. maculata (spot form), the causal agents of barley net blotch. We integrated two approaches, the comparison between the population structures of the host and the pathogens, and a cross-inoculation test. We demonstrated that two closely related pathogens with very similar niche specialisation and life-styles can give rise to different co-evolutionary outcomes on the same host. Indeed, we detected local adaptation for the net form of the pathogen but not for the spot form. We also provided evidence that an a-priori well-known resistance quantitative-trait-locus on barley chromosome 6H is involved in the co-evolutionary 'arms race' between the plant and the net-form pathogen. Moreover, data suggested latitudinal clines of host resistance and that different ecological conditions can result in differential selective pressures at different sites. Our data are of interest for on-farm conservation of plant genetic resources, as also in establishing efficient breeding programs and strategies for deployment of resistance genes of P. teres.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus