Limits...
Epidemiology and impact of Fasciola hepatica exposure in high-yielding dairy herds.

Howell A, Baylis M, Smith R, Pinchbeck G, Williams D - Prev. Vet. Med. (2015)

Bottom Line: The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica is a trematode parasite with a worldwide distribution and is the cause of important production losses in the dairy industry.Bulk milk tank samples from 606 herds that supply a single retailer with liquid milk were tested with an antibody ELISA for F. hepatica.Higher rainfall, grazing boggy pasture, presence of beef cattle on farm, access to a stream or pond and smaller herd size were associated with an increased risk of exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infection Biology, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZJ, UK; School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Chester High Road, Neston, CH64 7TE, UK. Electronic address: alison.howell@liv.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

True F. hepatica seroprevalence in UK dairy herds by NUTS region, taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA. 95% confidence intervals are shown.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528078&req=5

fig0005: True F. hepatica seroprevalence in UK dairy herds by NUTS region, taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA. 95% confidence intervals are shown.

Mentions: Across all herds, the apparent prevalence of fluke infection was 79.7% (estimated true prevalence 78.1%; 95% CI 73.6–82.2%). England and Scotland had a similar apparent prevalence at 78.8% (True Prev. 77.5%; 95% CI 72.4–82.1%) and 75.8% (True Prev. 73.4%; 95% CI 57.7–85.7%), respectively. Wales had a higher apparent prevalence at 86.9% (True Prev. 88%; 95% CI 73.4-97.6%). When categorized by NUTS region, North West England had the highest apparent prevalence of 85.1% (True Prev. 84.8%; 95% CI 76.1–91.8%) whilst the lowest was the East Midlands with 69.2% (True Prev. 64.8%; 95% CI 45.9–80.1%) (Fig. 1). There were no significant differences between NUTS regions.


Epidemiology and impact of Fasciola hepatica exposure in high-yielding dairy herds.

Howell A, Baylis M, Smith R, Pinchbeck G, Williams D - Prev. Vet. Med. (2015)

True F. hepatica seroprevalence in UK dairy herds by NUTS region, taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA. 95% confidence intervals are shown.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4528078&req=5

fig0005: True F. hepatica seroprevalence in UK dairy herds by NUTS region, taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA. 95% confidence intervals are shown.
Mentions: Across all herds, the apparent prevalence of fluke infection was 79.7% (estimated true prevalence 78.1%; 95% CI 73.6–82.2%). England and Scotland had a similar apparent prevalence at 78.8% (True Prev. 77.5%; 95% CI 72.4–82.1%) and 75.8% (True Prev. 73.4%; 95% CI 57.7–85.7%), respectively. Wales had a higher apparent prevalence at 86.9% (True Prev. 88%; 95% CI 73.4-97.6%). When categorized by NUTS region, North West England had the highest apparent prevalence of 85.1% (True Prev. 84.8%; 95% CI 76.1–91.8%) whilst the lowest was the East Midlands with 69.2% (True Prev. 64.8%; 95% CI 45.9–80.1%) (Fig. 1). There were no significant differences between NUTS regions.

Bottom Line: The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica is a trematode parasite with a worldwide distribution and is the cause of important production losses in the dairy industry.Bulk milk tank samples from 606 herds that supply a single retailer with liquid milk were tested with an antibody ELISA for F. hepatica.Higher rainfall, grazing boggy pasture, presence of beef cattle on farm, access to a stream or pond and smaller herd size were associated with an increased risk of exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infection Biology, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZJ, UK; School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Chester High Road, Neston, CH64 7TE, UK. Electronic address: alison.howell@liv.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus