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One-Step Mask Etching Strategy Toward Ordered Ferroelectric Pb(Zr0.52Ti 0.48)O 3 Nanodot Arrays.

Zhang X, Kang M, Huang K, Zhang F, Lin S, Gao X, Lu X, Zhang Z, Liu J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: Therefore, the presented strategy is relatively simple and economical.Atomic and piezoresponse force microscopy indicated that the PZT nanodot arrays were with both good ordering and well-defined ferroelectric properties.Considering its universality on diverse substrates, the present method is a general approach to the high-quality ordered ferroelectric nanodot arrays, which is promising for applications in ultra-high density nonvolatile ferroelectric random access memories (NV-FRAM).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Advanced Materials and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Academy of Advanced Optoelectronics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510006, China, xiaoyanzhang001@yeah.net.

ABSTRACT
In this report, ordered lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) nanodot arrays were fabricated by an original one-step mask etching route. The one-step mask etching strategy is based on the patterned nanostructure of barrier layer (BL) at the bottom of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), by a direct transfer of the nanopattern from BL to the pre-deposited PZT film, without introduction of any sacrifice layer and lithography. Therefore, the presented strategy is relatively simple and economical. X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis revealed that the as-prepared PZT was in a perovskite phase. Atomic and piezoresponse force microscopy indicated that the PZT nanodot arrays were with both good ordering and well-defined ferroelectric properties. Considering its universality on diverse substrates, the present method is a general approach to the high-quality ordered ferroelectric nanodot arrays, which is promising for applications in ultra-high density nonvolatile ferroelectric random access memories (NV-FRAM).

No MeSH data available.


X-ray diffraction pattern and Raman spectrum of the ordered PZT nanodot arrays measured at room temperature. a X-ray diffraction pattern and b Raman spectrum
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Fig2: X-ray diffraction pattern and Raman spectrum of the ordered PZT nanodot arrays measured at room temperature. a X-ray diffraction pattern and b Raman spectrum

Mentions: Figure 2a, b illustrated the X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and Raman scattering spectrum of PZT nanodot arrays, respectively, measured at room temperature. Generally, the as-deposited PZT film was amorphous, and a post-deposition annealing was needed to transform the film from the amorphous to the desirable ferroelectric perovskite phase. The amorphous structure will first transform into an intermediate pyrochlore phase which was not expected in the final phase, and then the pyrochlore phase will transform into the perovskite phase higher than 650 °C. Actually, the perovskite phase grew from the surface of the pyrochlore film [32]. Figure 2a shows the XRD pattern of the PZT nanodot arrays fabricated by the one-step mask etching strategy; to avoid the pyrochlore phase, the annealing temperature was set to 700 °C and 10 % excess lead acetate trihydrate (Pb(CH3CO2)2·3H2O) was added in our experiments. The diffraction peak at 2θ = 31.35°, corresponding to the PZT (110) plane, was obviously stronger than the other peaks. The strong and sharp diffraction peaks are coincident with the peak pattern of the PZT perovskite crystalline structure [35]. Nevertheless, for the free-standing film, especially the thin film, the strain energy required to form the perovskite phase was usually diminished due to the strain relaxation in the direction perpendicular to the thin film [32, 33]. As a consequence, the existence of a surface pyrochlore phase cannot be avoided. To further confirm its composition, Raman spectrum of the nanodot arrays was analyzed. The six peaks can be recognized at 204, 273, 322, 569, 586, and 737 cm−1, corresponding to the lattice vibration modes of E(2TO), ET+B1, A1(2TO), E(3TO), A1(2TO), and A1(3LO), respectively. The observed Raman shift peaks are in accordance with the typical Raman shift peaks of the perovskite phase PZT [35-37].Fig. 2


One-Step Mask Etching Strategy Toward Ordered Ferroelectric Pb(Zr0.52Ti 0.48)O 3 Nanodot Arrays.

Zhang X, Kang M, Huang K, Zhang F, Lin S, Gao X, Lu X, Zhang Z, Liu J - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

X-ray diffraction pattern and Raman spectrum of the ordered PZT nanodot arrays measured at room temperature. a X-ray diffraction pattern and b Raman spectrum
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4527975&req=5

Fig2: X-ray diffraction pattern and Raman spectrum of the ordered PZT nanodot arrays measured at room temperature. a X-ray diffraction pattern and b Raman spectrum
Mentions: Figure 2a, b illustrated the X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and Raman scattering spectrum of PZT nanodot arrays, respectively, measured at room temperature. Generally, the as-deposited PZT film was amorphous, and a post-deposition annealing was needed to transform the film from the amorphous to the desirable ferroelectric perovskite phase. The amorphous structure will first transform into an intermediate pyrochlore phase which was not expected in the final phase, and then the pyrochlore phase will transform into the perovskite phase higher than 650 °C. Actually, the perovskite phase grew from the surface of the pyrochlore film [32]. Figure 2a shows the XRD pattern of the PZT nanodot arrays fabricated by the one-step mask etching strategy; to avoid the pyrochlore phase, the annealing temperature was set to 700 °C and 10 % excess lead acetate trihydrate (Pb(CH3CO2)2·3H2O) was added in our experiments. The diffraction peak at 2θ = 31.35°, corresponding to the PZT (110) plane, was obviously stronger than the other peaks. The strong and sharp diffraction peaks are coincident with the peak pattern of the PZT perovskite crystalline structure [35]. Nevertheless, for the free-standing film, especially the thin film, the strain energy required to form the perovskite phase was usually diminished due to the strain relaxation in the direction perpendicular to the thin film [32, 33]. As a consequence, the existence of a surface pyrochlore phase cannot be avoided. To further confirm its composition, Raman spectrum of the nanodot arrays was analyzed. The six peaks can be recognized at 204, 273, 322, 569, 586, and 737 cm−1, corresponding to the lattice vibration modes of E(2TO), ET+B1, A1(2TO), E(3TO), A1(2TO), and A1(3LO), respectively. The observed Raman shift peaks are in accordance with the typical Raman shift peaks of the perovskite phase PZT [35-37].Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Therefore, the presented strategy is relatively simple and economical.Atomic and piezoresponse force microscopy indicated that the PZT nanodot arrays were with both good ordering and well-defined ferroelectric properties.Considering its universality on diverse substrates, the present method is a general approach to the high-quality ordered ferroelectric nanodot arrays, which is promising for applications in ultra-high density nonvolatile ferroelectric random access memories (NV-FRAM).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Advanced Materials and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Academy of Advanced Optoelectronics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510006, China, xiaoyanzhang001@yeah.net.

ABSTRACT
In this report, ordered lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) nanodot arrays were fabricated by an original one-step mask etching route. The one-step mask etching strategy is based on the patterned nanostructure of barrier layer (BL) at the bottom of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), by a direct transfer of the nanopattern from BL to the pre-deposited PZT film, without introduction of any sacrifice layer and lithography. Therefore, the presented strategy is relatively simple and economical. X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis revealed that the as-prepared PZT was in a perovskite phase. Atomic and piezoresponse force microscopy indicated that the PZT nanodot arrays were with both good ordering and well-defined ferroelectric properties. Considering its universality on diverse substrates, the present method is a general approach to the high-quality ordered ferroelectric nanodot arrays, which is promising for applications in ultra-high density nonvolatile ferroelectric random access memories (NV-FRAM).

No MeSH data available.