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Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions.

Pusztahelyi T, Holb IJ, Pócsi I - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes.It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production.New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Laboratory, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management, University of Debrecen Debrecen, Hungary.

ABSTRACT
Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Autoinhibitor signal molecules responsible for inhibition of conidia germination. Phytotoxin pyriculol and gloeosporone, and/or appressorium formation: zosteric acid. Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubChem Compound Database (accessed Jun. 6, 2015) (Bolton et al., 2008).
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Figure 9: Autoinhibitor signal molecules responsible for inhibition of conidia germination. Phytotoxin pyriculol and gloeosporone, and/or appressorium formation: zosteric acid. Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubChem Compound Database (accessed Jun. 6, 2015) (Bolton et al., 2008).

Mentions: Chemical signals are responsible for appressorium formation in M. grisea. The appressorial glue of M. grisea contains glycoproteins, neutral lipids and glycolipids (Ebata et al., 1998). The non-toxic plant metabolite zosteric acid (Figure 9) (Todd et al., 1993) binds water and enhances the hydrophilicity of the surface, thereby weakening the binding capacity of the appressorial glue, which is highest with hydrophobic surfaces. Therefore, zosteric acid inhibits spore adhesion and infection by M. grisea and also by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum on artificial hydrophobic surfaces as well as on plant leaves (Stanley et al., 2002).


Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions.

Pusztahelyi T, Holb IJ, Pócsi I - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Autoinhibitor signal molecules responsible for inhibition of conidia germination. Phytotoxin pyriculol and gloeosporone, and/or appressorium formation: zosteric acid. Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubChem Compound Database (accessed Jun. 6, 2015) (Bolton et al., 2008).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4527079&req=5

Figure 9: Autoinhibitor signal molecules responsible for inhibition of conidia germination. Phytotoxin pyriculol and gloeosporone, and/or appressorium formation: zosteric acid. Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubChem Compound Database (accessed Jun. 6, 2015) (Bolton et al., 2008).
Mentions: Chemical signals are responsible for appressorium formation in M. grisea. The appressorial glue of M. grisea contains glycoproteins, neutral lipids and glycolipids (Ebata et al., 1998). The non-toxic plant metabolite zosteric acid (Figure 9) (Todd et al., 1993) binds water and enhances the hydrophilicity of the surface, thereby weakening the binding capacity of the appressorial glue, which is highest with hydrophobic surfaces. Therefore, zosteric acid inhibits spore adhesion and infection by M. grisea and also by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum on artificial hydrophobic surfaces as well as on plant leaves (Stanley et al., 2002).

Bottom Line: The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes.It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production.New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Central Laboratory, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management, University of Debrecen Debrecen, Hungary.

ABSTRACT
Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.