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Nanomaterials in consumer products: a challenging analytical problem.

Contado C - Front Chem (2015)

Bottom Line: Many products used in everyday life are made with the assistance of nanotechnologies.This information implies transversal studies and a number of different competences.More work should be done to produce standardized materials and to set-up methodologies to determine number-based size distributions and to get quantitative date about the NPs in such a complex matrices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara Ferrara, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Many products used in everyday life are made with the assistance of nanotechnologies. Cosmetic, pharmaceuticals, sunscreen, powdered food are only few examples of end products containing nano-sized particles (NPs), generally added to improve the product quality. To evaluate correctly benefits vs. risks of engineered nanomaterials and consequently to legislate in favor of consumer's protection, it is necessary to know the hazards connected with the exposure levels. This information implies transversal studies and a number of different competences. On analytical point of view the identification, quantification and characterization of NPs in food matrices and in cosmetic or personal care products pose significant challenges, because NPs are usually present at low concentration levels and the matrices, in which they are dispersed, are complexes and often incompatible with analytical instruments that would be required for their detection and characterization. This paper focused on some analytical techniques suitable for the detection, characterization and quantification of NPs in food and cosmetics products, reports their recent application in characterizing specific metal and metal-oxide NPs in these two important industrial and market sectors. The need of a characterization of the NPs as much as possible complete, matching complementary information about different metrics, possible achieved through validate procedures, is what clearly emerges from this research. More work should be done to produce standardized materials and to set-up methodologies to determine number-based size distributions and to get quantitative date about the NPs in such a complex matrices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Suggested stages for the NPs characterization in food/feed products and in cosmetic/personal care products (SCCS, 2012a; Singh et al., 2014).
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Figure 4: Suggested stages for the NPs characterization in food/feed products and in cosmetic/personal care products (SCCS, 2012a; Singh et al., 2014).

Mentions: In the field of food products, the characterization of NPs should include five stages: as manufactured, as delivered for use in food/feed products, as present in the food/feed matrix, as used in toxicity testing, and as present in biological fluids and tissues (Figure 4), this because the same physicochemical parameter might change in the different environments. The determination of the physicochemical characteristics of NPs is important in all stages since, for example, as manufactured involve the workers exposure, in situ (in the food/feed matrix) is relevant for the toxicity testing and in biological fluids and tissues is important for the “absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion” (ADME) studies.


Nanomaterials in consumer products: a challenging analytical problem.

Contado C - Front Chem (2015)

Suggested stages for the NPs characterization in food/feed products and in cosmetic/personal care products (SCCS, 2012a; Singh et al., 2014).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4527077&req=5

Figure 4: Suggested stages for the NPs characterization in food/feed products and in cosmetic/personal care products (SCCS, 2012a; Singh et al., 2014).
Mentions: In the field of food products, the characterization of NPs should include five stages: as manufactured, as delivered for use in food/feed products, as present in the food/feed matrix, as used in toxicity testing, and as present in biological fluids and tissues (Figure 4), this because the same physicochemical parameter might change in the different environments. The determination of the physicochemical characteristics of NPs is important in all stages since, for example, as manufactured involve the workers exposure, in situ (in the food/feed matrix) is relevant for the toxicity testing and in biological fluids and tissues is important for the “absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion” (ADME) studies.

Bottom Line: Many products used in everyday life are made with the assistance of nanotechnologies.This information implies transversal studies and a number of different competences.More work should be done to produce standardized materials and to set-up methodologies to determine number-based size distributions and to get quantitative date about the NPs in such a complex matrices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara Ferrara, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Many products used in everyday life are made with the assistance of nanotechnologies. Cosmetic, pharmaceuticals, sunscreen, powdered food are only few examples of end products containing nano-sized particles (NPs), generally added to improve the product quality. To evaluate correctly benefits vs. risks of engineered nanomaterials and consequently to legislate in favor of consumer's protection, it is necessary to know the hazards connected with the exposure levels. This information implies transversal studies and a number of different competences. On analytical point of view the identification, quantification and characterization of NPs in food matrices and in cosmetic or personal care products pose significant challenges, because NPs are usually present at low concentration levels and the matrices, in which they are dispersed, are complexes and often incompatible with analytical instruments that would be required for their detection and characterization. This paper focused on some analytical techniques suitable for the detection, characterization and quantification of NPs in food and cosmetics products, reports their recent application in characterizing specific metal and metal-oxide NPs in these two important industrial and market sectors. The need of a characterization of the NPs as much as possible complete, matching complementary information about different metrics, possible achieved through validate procedures, is what clearly emerges from this research. More work should be done to produce standardized materials and to set-up methodologies to determine number-based size distributions and to get quantitative date about the NPs in such a complex matrices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus