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A Validation Study of the Web-Based Physical Activity Questionnaire Active-Q Against the GENEA Accelerometer.

Bonn SE, Bergman P, Trolle Lagerros Y, Sjölander A, Bälter K - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Bottom Line: The validity correlation coefficients were statistically significant for time spent at all activity levels; sedentary (r=0.19, 95% CI: 0.04-0.34), LPA (r=0.15, 95% CI: 0.00-0.31), sedentary-to-light (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.19-0.51), MPA (r=0.27, 95% CI: 0.12-0.42), VPA (r=0.54, 95% CI: 0.42-0.67), and MVPA (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.21-0.48).More moderate and vigorous activities and less light activities were reported in Active-Q compared to accelerometer measurements.Active-Q shows comparable validity and reproducibility to other physical activity questionnaires used today.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. stephanie.bonn@ki.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Valid physical activity assessment in epidemiological studies is essential to study associations with various health outcomes.

Objective: To validate the Web-based physical activity questionnaire Active-Q by comparing results of time spent at different physical activity levels with results from the GENEA accelerometer and to assess the reproducibility of Active-Q by comparing two admissions of the questionnaire.

Methods: A total of 148 men (aged 33 to 86 years) responded to Active-Q twice and wore the accelerometer during seven consecutive days on two occasions. Time spent on six different physical activity levels including sedentary, light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) as well as additional combined categories of sedentary-to-light and moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA) physical activity was assessed. Validity of Active-Q was determined using Spearman correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and the Bland-Altman method. Reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) comparing two admissions of the questionnaire.

Results: The validity correlation coefficients were statistically significant for time spent at all activity levels; sedentary (r=0.19, 95% CI: 0.04-0.34), LPA (r=0.15, 95% CI: 0.00-0.31), sedentary-to-light (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.19-0.51), MPA (r=0.27, 95% CI: 0.12-0.42), VPA (r=0.54, 95% CI: 0.42-0.67), and MVPA (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.21-0.48). The Bland-Altman plots showed a negative mean difference for time in LPA and positive mean differences for time spent in MPA, VPA and MVPA. The ICCs of test-retest reliability ranged between r=0.51-0.80 for the different activity levels in Active-Q.

Conclusions: More moderate and vigorous activities and less light activities were reported in Active-Q compared to accelerometer measurements. Active-Q shows comparable validity and reproducibility to other physical activity questionnaires used today.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Timeline showing participants' responses to the first and second Active-Q questionnaire and when the first and second GENEA accelerometers were worn.
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figure1: Timeline showing participants' responses to the first and second Active-Q questionnaire and when the first and second GENEA accelerometers were worn.

Mentions: The study design is shown in Figure 1. Participants were enrolled in the study for a total of four weeks. On the first day of the study, the participants attended an introductory meeting at which they received the first GENEA accelerometer to wear during the following seven consecutive days. Participants also received the first Active-Q physical activity questionnaire via email on the evening of the same day. The questionnaire also included background questions on height, weight, birth year, education level and handedness. Individual user names and passwords served as identifiers for the questionnaire. After seven days, the accelerometer was returned to the research group via regular mail in a padded envelope with prepaid postage received during the introductory meeting. Three weeks later, on day 21 of the study, participants once again attended a meeting at a study site and were given a new GENEA accelerometer to wear for the following seven days before returning it via mail. They also received the second Active-Q questionnaire to respond to via email. All accelerometers were returned to study personnel at the end of each measurement period. An email reminder about the questionnaire was sent to participants who had not responded within a few days. Nevertheless, 84% responded the day of admission and a total of 96% had responded the following day.


A Validation Study of the Web-Based Physical Activity Questionnaire Active-Q Against the GENEA Accelerometer.

Bonn SE, Bergman P, Trolle Lagerros Y, Sjölander A, Bälter K - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Timeline showing participants' responses to the first and second Active-Q questionnaire and when the first and second GENEA accelerometers were worn.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4527001&req=5

figure1: Timeline showing participants' responses to the first and second Active-Q questionnaire and when the first and second GENEA accelerometers were worn.
Mentions: The study design is shown in Figure 1. Participants were enrolled in the study for a total of four weeks. On the first day of the study, the participants attended an introductory meeting at which they received the first GENEA accelerometer to wear during the following seven consecutive days. Participants also received the first Active-Q physical activity questionnaire via email on the evening of the same day. The questionnaire also included background questions on height, weight, birth year, education level and handedness. Individual user names and passwords served as identifiers for the questionnaire. After seven days, the accelerometer was returned to the research group via regular mail in a padded envelope with prepaid postage received during the introductory meeting. Three weeks later, on day 21 of the study, participants once again attended a meeting at a study site and were given a new GENEA accelerometer to wear for the following seven days before returning it via mail. They also received the second Active-Q questionnaire to respond to via email. All accelerometers were returned to study personnel at the end of each measurement period. An email reminder about the questionnaire was sent to participants who had not responded within a few days. Nevertheless, 84% responded the day of admission and a total of 96% had responded the following day.

Bottom Line: The validity correlation coefficients were statistically significant for time spent at all activity levels; sedentary (r=0.19, 95% CI: 0.04-0.34), LPA (r=0.15, 95% CI: 0.00-0.31), sedentary-to-light (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.19-0.51), MPA (r=0.27, 95% CI: 0.12-0.42), VPA (r=0.54, 95% CI: 0.42-0.67), and MVPA (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.21-0.48).More moderate and vigorous activities and less light activities were reported in Active-Q compared to accelerometer measurements.Active-Q shows comparable validity and reproducibility to other physical activity questionnaires used today.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. stephanie.bonn@ki.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Valid physical activity assessment in epidemiological studies is essential to study associations with various health outcomes.

Objective: To validate the Web-based physical activity questionnaire Active-Q by comparing results of time spent at different physical activity levels with results from the GENEA accelerometer and to assess the reproducibility of Active-Q by comparing two admissions of the questionnaire.

Methods: A total of 148 men (aged 33 to 86 years) responded to Active-Q twice and wore the accelerometer during seven consecutive days on two occasions. Time spent on six different physical activity levels including sedentary, light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) as well as additional combined categories of sedentary-to-light and moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA) physical activity was assessed. Validity of Active-Q was determined using Spearman correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and the Bland-Altman method. Reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) comparing two admissions of the questionnaire.

Results: The validity correlation coefficients were statistically significant for time spent at all activity levels; sedentary (r=0.19, 95% CI: 0.04-0.34), LPA (r=0.15, 95% CI: 0.00-0.31), sedentary-to-light (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.19-0.51), MPA (r=0.27, 95% CI: 0.12-0.42), VPA (r=0.54, 95% CI: 0.42-0.67), and MVPA (r=0.35, 95% CI: 0.21-0.48). The Bland-Altman plots showed a negative mean difference for time in LPA and positive mean differences for time spent in MPA, VPA and MVPA. The ICCs of test-retest reliability ranged between r=0.51-0.80 for the different activity levels in Active-Q.

Conclusions: More moderate and vigorous activities and less light activities were reported in Active-Q compared to accelerometer measurements. Active-Q shows comparable validity and reproducibility to other physical activity questionnaires used today.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus