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How to Increase Reach and Adherence of Web-Based Interventions: A Design Research Viewpoint.

Ludden GD, van Rompay TJ, Kelders SM, van Gemert-Pijnen JE - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds.In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential.Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Design, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands. g.d.s.ludden@utwente.nl.

ABSTRACT
Nowadays, technology is increasingly used to increase people's well-being. For example, many mobile and Web-based apps have been developed that can support people to become mentally fit or to manage their daily diet. However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds. In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential. We propose looking at design research as a source of inspiration for new (to the field) design approaches. The paper goes on to specify and discuss three of these approaches: personalization, ambient information, and use of metaphors. Central to our viewpoint is the role of positive affect triggered by well-designed persuasive features to boost adherence and well-being. Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research.

No MeSH data available.


Final prototype of the Web-based intervention, This Is Your Life!
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure7: Final prototype of the Web-based intervention, This Is Your Life!

Mentions: The concept of the intervention presented as a journey on a map—favored by all 8 participants in a focus group—was further developed into a working prototype (see Figure 7). For the final prototype, the metaphor of the journey was further developed into details of the intervention. For example, the typical terminology from training or school-like activities (ie, lessons, exercises, chapters) was changed into terminology that was more relevant to the metaphor of the journey. For instance, chapters are locations on the map and each location has challenges which are the exercises of the training. When a user completes the challenges for a specific location, he or she can get the "key" to the next location. Locations also have names that are related to the "life is a journey" metaphor, such as "The island of broken dreams" and "The river of flow."


How to Increase Reach and Adherence of Web-Based Interventions: A Design Research Viewpoint.

Ludden GD, van Rompay TJ, Kelders SM, van Gemert-Pijnen JE - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Final prototype of the Web-based intervention, This Is Your Life!
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526989&req=5

figure7: Final prototype of the Web-based intervention, This Is Your Life!
Mentions: The concept of the intervention presented as a journey on a map—favored by all 8 participants in a focus group—was further developed into a working prototype (see Figure 7). For the final prototype, the metaphor of the journey was further developed into details of the intervention. For example, the typical terminology from training or school-like activities (ie, lessons, exercises, chapters) was changed into terminology that was more relevant to the metaphor of the journey. For instance, chapters are locations on the map and each location has challenges which are the exercises of the training. When a user completes the challenges for a specific location, he or she can get the "key" to the next location. Locations also have names that are related to the "life is a journey" metaphor, such as "The island of broken dreams" and "The river of flow."

Bottom Line: However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds.In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential.Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Design, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands. g.d.s.ludden@utwente.nl.

ABSTRACT
Nowadays, technology is increasingly used to increase people's well-being. For example, many mobile and Web-based apps have been developed that can support people to become mentally fit or to manage their daily diet. However, analyses of current Web-based interventions show that many systems are only used by a specific group of users (eg, women, highly educated), and that even they often do not persist and drop out as the intervention unfolds. In this paper, we assess the impact of design features of Web-based interventions on reach and adherence and conclude that the power that design can have has not been used to its full potential. We propose looking at design research as a source of inspiration for new (to the field) design approaches. The paper goes on to specify and discuss three of these approaches: personalization, ambient information, and use of metaphors. Central to our viewpoint is the role of positive affect triggered by well-designed persuasive features to boost adherence and well-being. Finally, we discuss the future of persuasive eHealth interventions and suggest avenues for follow-up research.

No MeSH data available.