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Readability of Information Related to the Parenting of a Child With a Cleft.

De Felippe N, Kar F - Interact J Med Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Overall, the mean readability of the media resources analyzed was considered "hard to read." No statistically significant mean difference was found for the readability level across websites, books, and booklets/factsheets (Kruskal-Wallis test, significance level .05).With the US national reading level average at 8th grade and the general recommendation that health-related information be written at a 6th grade level, many parents may find the text they are reading too difficult to comprehend.Therefore, many families might be missing out on the opportunity to learn parenting practices that foster optimal psychosocial development of their children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Dentistry, Division of Orthodontics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many parents look to various sources for information about parenting when their child has a cleft lip and/or palate. More than 8 million Americans perform health-related searches every day on the World Wide Web. Furthermore, a significant number of them report feeling "overwhelmed" by the language and content of the information.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the readability of information related to parenting a child with cleft lip and/or palate. It was hypothesized that the readability of such materials would be at a level higher than 6th grade.

Methods: In February of 2012, a Web-based search was conducted using the search engine Google for the terms "parenting cleft lip and palate."

Results: A total of 15 websites, 7 books, and 8 booklets/factsheets (N=30) entered the readability analysis. Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Fog Scale Level, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) index scores were calculated. The reading level of the websites and books ranged from 8th to 9th and 9th to10th grade, respectively. The average reading level of the booklets/factsheets was 10th grade. Overall, the mean readability of the media resources analyzed was considered "hard to read." No statistically significant mean difference was found for the readability level across websites, books, and booklets/factsheets (Kruskal-Wallis test, significance level .05).

Conclusions: When considering websites, books, booklets, and factsheets analyzed, the average readability level was between 8th and 10th grade. With the US national reading level average at 8th grade and the general recommendation that health-related information be written at a 6th grade level, many parents may find the text they are reading too difficult to comprehend. Therefore, many families might be missing out on the opportunity to learn parenting practices that foster optimal psychosocial development of their children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram of data collection.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure1: Diagram of data collection.

Mentions: The links that offered written resources such as books, booklets, and factsheets were also recorded. This Google search led to the finding of 25 books and 18 booklets/factsheets. Of those, only the books (32%, 8/25) and booklets/fact sheets (44%, 8/18) addressing the “parenting” theme entered the readability analysis (Multimedia Appendices 2 and 3). After directly contacting the author of one of the books, it was learned that its reprints were no longer being published and we were thus unable to perform the readability test on it. Therefore, a total of 7 books were included. A thematic analysis of the content of each resource was performed so that patterns of information could be recorded. After familiarization with the data, initial codes were generated and generic themes emerged from the preliminary analysis. Lastly, a list with the most frequent themes (ie, author, country of origin, information specific on cleft, terms and definitions, etiology, team approach, feeding, surgery, orthodontics, speech, hearing, links and paths to request information, social support, as well as information on parenting practices) was created. Websites, books and booklets/factsheets had their content analyzed for the presence or absence of each theme. The data collection process is shown in Figure 1.


Readability of Information Related to the Parenting of a Child With a Cleft.

De Felippe N, Kar F - Interact J Med Res (2015)

Diagram of data collection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526983&req=5

figure1: Diagram of data collection.
Mentions: The links that offered written resources such as books, booklets, and factsheets were also recorded. This Google search led to the finding of 25 books and 18 booklets/factsheets. Of those, only the books (32%, 8/25) and booklets/fact sheets (44%, 8/18) addressing the “parenting” theme entered the readability analysis (Multimedia Appendices 2 and 3). After directly contacting the author of one of the books, it was learned that its reprints were no longer being published and we were thus unable to perform the readability test on it. Therefore, a total of 7 books were included. A thematic analysis of the content of each resource was performed so that patterns of information could be recorded. After familiarization with the data, initial codes were generated and generic themes emerged from the preliminary analysis. Lastly, a list with the most frequent themes (ie, author, country of origin, information specific on cleft, terms and definitions, etiology, team approach, feeding, surgery, orthodontics, speech, hearing, links and paths to request information, social support, as well as information on parenting practices) was created. Websites, books and booklets/factsheets had their content analyzed for the presence or absence of each theme. The data collection process is shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Overall, the mean readability of the media resources analyzed was considered "hard to read." No statistically significant mean difference was found for the readability level across websites, books, and booklets/factsheets (Kruskal-Wallis test, significance level .05).With the US national reading level average at 8th grade and the general recommendation that health-related information be written at a 6th grade level, many parents may find the text they are reading too difficult to comprehend.Therefore, many families might be missing out on the opportunity to learn parenting practices that foster optimal psychosocial development of their children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Dentistry, Division of Orthodontics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many parents look to various sources for information about parenting when their child has a cleft lip and/or palate. More than 8 million Americans perform health-related searches every day on the World Wide Web. Furthermore, a significant number of them report feeling "overwhelmed" by the language and content of the information.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the readability of information related to parenting a child with cleft lip and/or palate. It was hypothesized that the readability of such materials would be at a level higher than 6th grade.

Methods: In February of 2012, a Web-based search was conducted using the search engine Google for the terms "parenting cleft lip and palate."

Results: A total of 15 websites, 7 books, and 8 booklets/factsheets (N=30) entered the readability analysis. Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Fog Scale Level, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) index scores were calculated. The reading level of the websites and books ranged from 8th to 9th and 9th to10th grade, respectively. The average reading level of the booklets/factsheets was 10th grade. Overall, the mean readability of the media resources analyzed was considered "hard to read." No statistically significant mean difference was found for the readability level across websites, books, and booklets/factsheets (Kruskal-Wallis test, significance level .05).

Conclusions: When considering websites, books, booklets, and factsheets analyzed, the average readability level was between 8th and 10th grade. With the US national reading level average at 8th grade and the general recommendation that health-related information be written at a 6th grade level, many parents may find the text they are reading too difficult to comprehend. Therefore, many families might be missing out on the opportunity to learn parenting practices that foster optimal psychosocial development of their children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus