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Information and Communication Technology Use Among Low-Income Pregnant and Postpartum Women by Race and Ethnicity: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Chilukuri N, West M, Henderson JL, Lawson S, Ehsanipoor R, Costigan K, Polk S, Bennett W - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Women with limited English language proficiency were less likely to use the Internet overall (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.99) or use email (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.63) compared to women with adequate English language proficiency.Mobile phones are widely available for the delivery of health interventions to low-income, racially diverse pregnant and postpartum women, but disparities in Internet use and SMS text messaging exist.Interventions or programs requiring Web-based apps may have lower uptake unless alternatives are available, such as those adapted for limited English proficiency populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pregnancy and the postpartum period provide windows of opportunity to impact perinatal and lifelong preventive health behavior for women and their families, but these opportunities are often missed. Understanding racial/ethnic differences in information and communication technology (ICT) use could inform technology-based interventions in diverse populations.

Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate differences in the use of ICT between racial and ethnic groups as well as by English language proficiency.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 246 women who were aged 18 years or older and pregnant or within 1 year of delivery. They were recruited from 4 hospital-based outpatient clinics and completed a self-administered survey. We used multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the association between race/ethnicity and ICT (mobile phone/short message service [SMS] text message, Internet, and social network) usage by race/ethnicity and perceived English language proficiency after adjusting for age, income, marital status, and insurance status.

Results: In all, 28% (69/246) of participants were Latina, 40% (98/246) were African American, 23% (56/246) were white, and 9% (23/246) from other racial/ethnic groups. Of the Latinas, 84% (58/69) reported limited English language proficiency and 59% (41/69) were uninsured. More than 90% of all participants reported mobile phone use, but more than 25% (65/246) had changed phone numbers 2 or more times in the past year. Compared to white women, African American women were less likely to SMS text message (OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.63) and Latinas were less likely to use the Internet to find others with similar concerns (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.08-0.73). Women with limited English language proficiency were less likely to use the Internet overall (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.99) or use email (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.63) compared to women with adequate English language proficiency.

Conclusions: Mobile phones are widely available for the delivery of health interventions to low-income, racially diverse pregnant and postpartum women, but disparities in Internet use and SMS text messaging exist. Interventions or programs requiring Web-based apps may have lower uptake unless alternatives are available, such as those adapted for limited English proficiency populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rates of use of information and communication technology modality and function by English language proficiency (adequate vs limited).
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figure1: Rates of use of information and communication technology modality and function by English language proficiency (adequate vs limited).

Mentions: Mobile phone use was greater than 90% (234/246) among all racial and ethnic groups with African American women reporting the lowest rate of 92% (90/98) (Table 1). Compared with African American and white women, fewer Latina women used smartphones (55%, 38/69), social networking sites (54%, 37/69), or accessed the Internet (62%, 43/69) (Table 1). However, the majority of women in all racial/ethnic groups used mobile phones for SMS text messaging, although the rate was slightly lower for African American women (Latina: 88%, 61/69; African American: 85%, 83/98; white: 98%, 55/56) (Table 1). More than one-quarter of the sample (26%, 65/246) reported having 2 or more different mobile phone numbers in the past 12 months and 43% (106/246) of women reported having a home phone number or landline. Compared with women with adequate spoken English language proficiency, women with limited English language proficiency less frequently used all forms of ICT (Figure 1). Among Latinas, those with limited English proficiency had lower use of Internet (38/69, 55%) compared to Latinas with adequate English language proficiency (55%, 32/58 vs 100%, 11/11, P=.005) (not shown).


Information and Communication Technology Use Among Low-Income Pregnant and Postpartum Women by Race and Ethnicity: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Chilukuri N, West M, Henderson JL, Lawson S, Ehsanipoor R, Costigan K, Polk S, Bennett W - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Rates of use of information and communication technology modality and function by English language proficiency (adequate vs limited).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526977&req=5

figure1: Rates of use of information and communication technology modality and function by English language proficiency (adequate vs limited).
Mentions: Mobile phone use was greater than 90% (234/246) among all racial and ethnic groups with African American women reporting the lowest rate of 92% (90/98) (Table 1). Compared with African American and white women, fewer Latina women used smartphones (55%, 38/69), social networking sites (54%, 37/69), or accessed the Internet (62%, 43/69) (Table 1). However, the majority of women in all racial/ethnic groups used mobile phones for SMS text messaging, although the rate was slightly lower for African American women (Latina: 88%, 61/69; African American: 85%, 83/98; white: 98%, 55/56) (Table 1). More than one-quarter of the sample (26%, 65/246) reported having 2 or more different mobile phone numbers in the past 12 months and 43% (106/246) of women reported having a home phone number or landline. Compared with women with adequate spoken English language proficiency, women with limited English language proficiency less frequently used all forms of ICT (Figure 1). Among Latinas, those with limited English proficiency had lower use of Internet (38/69, 55%) compared to Latinas with adequate English language proficiency (55%, 32/58 vs 100%, 11/11, P=.005) (not shown).

Bottom Line: Women with limited English language proficiency were less likely to use the Internet overall (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.99) or use email (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.63) compared to women with adequate English language proficiency.Mobile phones are widely available for the delivery of health interventions to low-income, racially diverse pregnant and postpartum women, but disparities in Internet use and SMS text messaging exist.Interventions or programs requiring Web-based apps may have lower uptake unless alternatives are available, such as those adapted for limited English proficiency populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pregnancy and the postpartum period provide windows of opportunity to impact perinatal and lifelong preventive health behavior for women and their families, but these opportunities are often missed. Understanding racial/ethnic differences in information and communication technology (ICT) use could inform technology-based interventions in diverse populations.

Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate differences in the use of ICT between racial and ethnic groups as well as by English language proficiency.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 246 women who were aged 18 years or older and pregnant or within 1 year of delivery. They were recruited from 4 hospital-based outpatient clinics and completed a self-administered survey. We used multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the association between race/ethnicity and ICT (mobile phone/short message service [SMS] text message, Internet, and social network) usage by race/ethnicity and perceived English language proficiency after adjusting for age, income, marital status, and insurance status.

Results: In all, 28% (69/246) of participants were Latina, 40% (98/246) were African American, 23% (56/246) were white, and 9% (23/246) from other racial/ethnic groups. Of the Latinas, 84% (58/69) reported limited English language proficiency and 59% (41/69) were uninsured. More than 90% of all participants reported mobile phone use, but more than 25% (65/246) had changed phone numbers 2 or more times in the past year. Compared to white women, African American women were less likely to SMS text message (OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.63) and Latinas were less likely to use the Internet to find others with similar concerns (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.08-0.73). Women with limited English language proficiency were less likely to use the Internet overall (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.99) or use email (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.63) compared to women with adequate English language proficiency.

Conclusions: Mobile phones are widely available for the delivery of health interventions to low-income, racially diverse pregnant and postpartum women, but disparities in Internet use and SMS text messaging exist. Interventions or programs requiring Web-based apps may have lower uptake unless alternatives are available, such as those adapted for limited English proficiency populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus