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Defining the Content of an Online Sexual Health Intervention: The MenSS Website.

Webster R, Gerressu M, Michie S, Estcourt C, Anderson J, Ang CS, Murray E, Rait G, Stephenson J, Bailey JV, MenSS Trial Gro - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Bottom Line: Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website.Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: eHealth Unit, Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. drrosiewebster@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Health promotion and risk reduction are essential components of sexual health care. However, it can be difficult to prioritize these within busy clinical services. Digital interventions may provide a new method for supporting these.

Objective: The MenSS (Men's Safer Sex) website is an interactive digital intervention developed by a multidisciplinary team, which aims to improve condom use in men who have sex with women (MSW). This paper describes the content of this intervention, and the rationale for it.

Methods: Content was informed by a literature review regarding men's barriers to condom use, workshops with experts in sexual health and technology (N=16) and interviews with men in sexual health clinics (N=20). Data from these sources were analyzed thematically, and synthesized using the Behavior Change Wheel framework.

Results: The MenSS intervention is a website optimized for delivery via tablet computer within a clinic waiting room setting. Key targets identified were condom use skills, beliefs about pleasure and knowledge about risk. Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.

Conclusions: This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website. Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reminders and plans feature.
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figure6: Reminders and plans feature.

Mentions: In each section of the website, users were offered goals to set which related to the website content (see Figure 6). When selected, these goals populated users’ own personalized “Reminders and plans” page. Users could opt to receive a reminder by email at a specific time, set time-limited goals (e.g. “I will purchase my recommended condoms” by a selected date), or choose event-specific goals, by forming an implementation intention [36] (“if-then plan”), identifying a potential situation where condom use may be unlikely, and then selecting a response to that situation.


Defining the Content of an Online Sexual Health Intervention: The MenSS Website.

Webster R, Gerressu M, Michie S, Estcourt C, Anderson J, Ang CS, Murray E, Rait G, Stephenson J, Bailey JV, MenSS Trial Gro - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Reminders and plans feature.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526976&req=5

figure6: Reminders and plans feature.
Mentions: In each section of the website, users were offered goals to set which related to the website content (see Figure 6). When selected, these goals populated users’ own personalized “Reminders and plans” page. Users could opt to receive a reminder by email at a specific time, set time-limited goals (e.g. “I will purchase my recommended condoms” by a selected date), or choose event-specific goals, by forming an implementation intention [36] (“if-then plan”), identifying a potential situation where condom use may be unlikely, and then selecting a response to that situation.

Bottom Line: Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website.Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: eHealth Unit, Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. drrosiewebster@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Health promotion and risk reduction are essential components of sexual health care. However, it can be difficult to prioritize these within busy clinical services. Digital interventions may provide a new method for supporting these.

Objective: The MenSS (Men's Safer Sex) website is an interactive digital intervention developed by a multidisciplinary team, which aims to improve condom use in men who have sex with women (MSW). This paper describes the content of this intervention, and the rationale for it.

Methods: Content was informed by a literature review regarding men's barriers to condom use, workshops with experts in sexual health and technology (N=16) and interviews with men in sexual health clinics (N=20). Data from these sources were analyzed thematically, and synthesized using the Behavior Change Wheel framework.

Results: The MenSS intervention is a website optimized for delivery via tablet computer within a clinic waiting room setting. Key targets identified were condom use skills, beliefs about pleasure and knowledge about risk. Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.

Conclusions: This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website. Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus