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Defining the Content of an Online Sexual Health Intervention: The MenSS Website.

Webster R, Gerressu M, Michie S, Estcourt C, Anderson J, Ang CS, Murray E, Rait G, Stephenson J, Bailey JV, MenSS Trial Gro - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Bottom Line: Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website.Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: eHealth Unit, Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. drrosiewebster@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Health promotion and risk reduction are essential components of sexual health care. However, it can be difficult to prioritize these within busy clinical services. Digital interventions may provide a new method for supporting these.

Objective: The MenSS (Men's Safer Sex) website is an interactive digital intervention developed by a multidisciplinary team, which aims to improve condom use in men who have sex with women (MSW). This paper describes the content of this intervention, and the rationale for it.

Methods: Content was informed by a literature review regarding men's barriers to condom use, workshops with experts in sexual health and technology (N=16) and interviews with men in sexual health clinics (N=20). Data from these sources were analyzed thematically, and synthesized using the Behavior Change Wheel framework.

Results: The MenSS intervention is a website optimized for delivery via tablet computer within a clinic waiting room setting. Key targets identified were condom use skills, beliefs about pleasure and knowledge about risk. Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.

Conclusions: This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website. Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of data collection processes.
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figure1: Flow diagram of data collection processes.

Mentions: Three sources of information were used to determine the intervention content, format, and style (see Figure 1): research literature, expert views, and interviews with the target population (men in sexual health clinics). This evidence was discussed and evaluated in two expert consultation workshops. The development process was iterative, seeking comment and refinement of prototypes of website content from service users. The intervention took the form of an interactive website, rather than a mobile phone app, due to issues of privacy (ie an app would need to be stored on a user’s phone, which could be accessed by other people) and availability (ie not all users may own a mobile phone which could run an app).


Defining the Content of an Online Sexual Health Intervention: The MenSS Website.

Webster R, Gerressu M, Michie S, Estcourt C, Anderson J, Ang CS, Murray E, Rait G, Stephenson J, Bailey JV, MenSS Trial Gro - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Flow diagram of data collection processes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526976&req=5

figure1: Flow diagram of data collection processes.
Mentions: Three sources of information were used to determine the intervention content, format, and style (see Figure 1): research literature, expert views, and interviews with the target population (men in sexual health clinics). This evidence was discussed and evaluated in two expert consultation workshops. The development process was iterative, seeking comment and refinement of prototypes of website content from service users. The intervention took the form of an interactive website, rather than a mobile phone app, due to issues of privacy (ie an app would need to be stored on a user’s phone, which could be accessed by other people) and availability (ie not all users may own a mobile phone which could run an app).

Bottom Line: Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website.Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: eHealth Unit, Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. drrosiewebster@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Health promotion and risk reduction are essential components of sexual health care. However, it can be difficult to prioritize these within busy clinical services. Digital interventions may provide a new method for supporting these.

Objective: The MenSS (Men's Safer Sex) website is an interactive digital intervention developed by a multidisciplinary team, which aims to improve condom use in men who have sex with women (MSW). This paper describes the content of this intervention, and the rationale for it.

Methods: Content was informed by a literature review regarding men's barriers to condom use, workshops with experts in sexual health and technology (N=16) and interviews with men in sexual health clinics (N=20). Data from these sources were analyzed thematically, and synthesized using the Behavior Change Wheel framework.

Results: The MenSS intervention is a website optimized for delivery via tablet computer within a clinic waiting room setting. Key targets identified were condom use skills, beliefs about pleasure and knowledge about risk. Content was developed using behavior change techniques, and interactive website features provided feedback tailored for individual users.

Conclusions: This paper provides a detailed description of an evidence-based interactive digital intervention for sexual health, including how behavior change techniques were translated into practice within the design of the MenSS website. Triangulation between a targeted literature review, expert workshops, and interviews with men ensured that a range of potential influences on condom use were captured.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus