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Analysis of PubMed User Sessions Using a Full-Day PubMed Query Log: A Comparison of Experienced and Nonexperienced PubMed Users.

Yoo I, Mosa AS - JMIR Med Inform (2015)

Bottom Line: Previous studies examined the effects of domain expertise/knowledge on search performance using PubMed.To test our hypotheses, we measured how successful information retrieval was (at retrieving relevant documents), represented as the decrease rates of experienced and nonexperienced users from a session length of 1 to 2, 3, 4, and 5.The decrease rate (from a session length of 1 to 2) of the experienced users was significantly larger than that of the nonexperienced groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Management and Informatics, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, United States. yooil@health.missouri.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: PubMed is the largest biomedical bibliographic information source on the Internet. PubMed has been considered one of the most important and reliable sources of up-to-date health care evidence. Previous studies examined the effects of domain expertise/knowledge on search performance using PubMed. However, very little is known about PubMed users' knowledge of information retrieval (IR) functions and their usage in query formulation.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to shed light on how experienced/nonexperienced PubMed users perform their search queries by analyzing a full-day query log. Our hypotheses were that (1) experienced PubMed users who use system functions quickly retrieve relevant documents and (2) nonexperienced PubMed users who do not use them have longer search sessions than experienced users.

Methods: To test these hypotheses, we analyzed PubMed query log data containing nearly 3 million queries. User sessions were divided into two categories: experienced and nonexperienced. We compared experienced and nonexperienced users per number of sessions, and experienced and nonexperienced user sessions per session length, with a focus on how fast they completed their sessions.

Results: To test our hypotheses, we measured how successful information retrieval was (at retrieving relevant documents), represented as the decrease rates of experienced and nonexperienced users from a session length of 1 to 2, 3, 4, and 5. The decrease rate (from a session length of 1 to 2) of the experienced users was significantly larger than that of the nonexperienced groups.

Conclusions: Experienced PubMed users retrieve relevant documents more quickly than nonexperienced PubMed users in terms of session length.

No MeSH data available.


Data cleaning and preprocessing.
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figure1: Data cleaning and preprocessing.

Mentions: The data cleaning and preprocessing steps are presented in Figure 1. We found 1146 records with empty user IDs, 76 records with unusual user IDs (we believe they were errors), and 77,923 records with no user-query text. These records (79,145/2,996,301, 2.64%) were eliminated from the dataset.


Analysis of PubMed User Sessions Using a Full-Day PubMed Query Log: A Comparison of Experienced and Nonexperienced PubMed Users.

Yoo I, Mosa AS - JMIR Med Inform (2015)

Data cleaning and preprocessing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526974&req=5

figure1: Data cleaning and preprocessing.
Mentions: The data cleaning and preprocessing steps are presented in Figure 1. We found 1146 records with empty user IDs, 76 records with unusual user IDs (we believe they were errors), and 77,923 records with no user-query text. These records (79,145/2,996,301, 2.64%) were eliminated from the dataset.

Bottom Line: Previous studies examined the effects of domain expertise/knowledge on search performance using PubMed.To test our hypotheses, we measured how successful information retrieval was (at retrieving relevant documents), represented as the decrease rates of experienced and nonexperienced users from a session length of 1 to 2, 3, 4, and 5.The decrease rate (from a session length of 1 to 2) of the experienced users was significantly larger than that of the nonexperienced groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Management and Informatics, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, United States. yooil@health.missouri.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: PubMed is the largest biomedical bibliographic information source on the Internet. PubMed has been considered one of the most important and reliable sources of up-to-date health care evidence. Previous studies examined the effects of domain expertise/knowledge on search performance using PubMed. However, very little is known about PubMed users' knowledge of information retrieval (IR) functions and their usage in query formulation.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to shed light on how experienced/nonexperienced PubMed users perform their search queries by analyzing a full-day query log. Our hypotheses were that (1) experienced PubMed users who use system functions quickly retrieve relevant documents and (2) nonexperienced PubMed users who do not use them have longer search sessions than experienced users.

Methods: To test these hypotheses, we analyzed PubMed query log data containing nearly 3 million queries. User sessions were divided into two categories: experienced and nonexperienced. We compared experienced and nonexperienced users per number of sessions, and experienced and nonexperienced user sessions per session length, with a focus on how fast they completed their sessions.

Results: To test our hypotheses, we measured how successful information retrieval was (at retrieving relevant documents), represented as the decrease rates of experienced and nonexperienced users from a session length of 1 to 2, 3, 4, and 5. The decrease rate (from a session length of 1 to 2) of the experienced users was significantly larger than that of the nonexperienced groups.

Conclusions: Experienced PubMed users retrieve relevant documents more quickly than nonexperienced PubMed users in terms of session length.

No MeSH data available.