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Improving Pediatric Basic Life Support Performance Through Blended Learning With Web-Based Virtual Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial.

Lehmann R, Thiessen C, Frick B, Bosse HM, Nikendei C, Hoffmann GF, Tönshoff B, Huwendiek S - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Procedural knowledge of the intervention group was significantly superior to that of the control group at t1.At t2, the intervention group showed significantly better adherence to the algorithm and temporal demands, and better procedural quality of PBLS in objective measures than did the control group.Self-assessments differed significantly only at t1 in favor of the intervention group.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Department of General Pediatrics, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. ronny.lehmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: E-learning and blended learning approaches gain more and more popularity in emergency medicine curricula. So far, little data is available on the impact of such approaches on procedural learning and skill acquisition and their comparison with traditional approaches.

Objective: This study investigated the impact of a blended learning approach, including Web-based virtual patients (VPs) and standard pediatric basic life support (PBLS) training, on procedural knowledge, objective performance, and self-assessment.

Methods: A total of 57 medical students were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=30) and a control group (n=27). Both groups received paper handouts in preparation of simulation-based PBLS training. The intervention group additionally completed two Web-based VPs with embedded video clips. Measurements were taken at randomization (t0), after the preparation period (t1), and after hands-on training (t2). Clinical decision-making skills and procedural knowledge were assessed at t0 and t1. PBLS performance was scored regarding adherence to the correct algorithm, conformance to temporal demands, and the quality of procedural steps at t1 and t2. Participants' self-assessments were recorded in all three measurements.

Results: Procedural knowledge of the intervention group was significantly superior to that of the control group at t1. At t2, the intervention group showed significantly better adherence to the algorithm and temporal demands, and better procedural quality of PBLS in objective measures than did the control group. These aspects differed between the groups even at t1 (after VPs, prior to practical training). Self-assessments differed significantly only at t1 in favor of the intervention group.

Conclusions: Training with VPs combined with hands-on training improves PBLS performance as judged by objective measures.

No MeSH data available.


Screenshot of CAMPUS-Software showing a virtual patient.
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figure2: Screenshot of CAMPUS-Software showing a virtual patient.

Mentions: For individual preparation of the training, we developed and distributed to both groups a paper handout on PBLS. Such handouts are commonly used as preparation for undergraduate skills laboratories [28]. The handout contained all relevant information, explaining the procedural steps of PBLS, including the algorithm, temporal demands, and a flowchart. Additionally, the intervention group was given Web-based access to two VPs dealing with PBLS in infants and toddlers. The VPs were designed with CAMPUS-Software [29] according to published design criteria [11] and enriched by video clips and interactive graphics (see Figure 2). For more detailed characterization of the VP cases used for this study, see Lehmann et al (VP3 and VP4) [17]. Both VPs had to be worked up twice, which was checked electronically but without the ability to identify any participant. The required overall workup time was estimated at 30 to 60 min based on previously measured log data.


Improving Pediatric Basic Life Support Performance Through Blended Learning With Web-Based Virtual Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial.

Lehmann R, Thiessen C, Frick B, Bosse HM, Nikendei C, Hoffmann GF, Tönshoff B, Huwendiek S - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Screenshot of CAMPUS-Software showing a virtual patient.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526972&req=5

figure2: Screenshot of CAMPUS-Software showing a virtual patient.
Mentions: For individual preparation of the training, we developed and distributed to both groups a paper handout on PBLS. Such handouts are commonly used as preparation for undergraduate skills laboratories [28]. The handout contained all relevant information, explaining the procedural steps of PBLS, including the algorithm, temporal demands, and a flowchart. Additionally, the intervention group was given Web-based access to two VPs dealing with PBLS in infants and toddlers. The VPs were designed with CAMPUS-Software [29] according to published design criteria [11] and enriched by video clips and interactive graphics (see Figure 2). For more detailed characterization of the VP cases used for this study, see Lehmann et al (VP3 and VP4) [17]. Both VPs had to be worked up twice, which was checked electronically but without the ability to identify any participant. The required overall workup time was estimated at 30 to 60 min based on previously measured log data.

Bottom Line: Procedural knowledge of the intervention group was significantly superior to that of the control group at t1.At t2, the intervention group showed significantly better adherence to the algorithm and temporal demands, and better procedural quality of PBLS in objective measures than did the control group.Self-assessments differed significantly only at t1 in favor of the intervention group.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Department of General Pediatrics, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. ronny.lehmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: E-learning and blended learning approaches gain more and more popularity in emergency medicine curricula. So far, little data is available on the impact of such approaches on procedural learning and skill acquisition and their comparison with traditional approaches.

Objective: This study investigated the impact of a blended learning approach, including Web-based virtual patients (VPs) and standard pediatric basic life support (PBLS) training, on procedural knowledge, objective performance, and self-assessment.

Methods: A total of 57 medical students were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=30) and a control group (n=27). Both groups received paper handouts in preparation of simulation-based PBLS training. The intervention group additionally completed two Web-based VPs with embedded video clips. Measurements were taken at randomization (t0), after the preparation period (t1), and after hands-on training (t2). Clinical decision-making skills and procedural knowledge were assessed at t0 and t1. PBLS performance was scored regarding adherence to the correct algorithm, conformance to temporal demands, and the quality of procedural steps at t1 and t2. Participants' self-assessments were recorded in all three measurements.

Results: Procedural knowledge of the intervention group was significantly superior to that of the control group at t1. At t2, the intervention group showed significantly better adherence to the algorithm and temporal demands, and better procedural quality of PBLS in objective measures than did the control group. These aspects differed between the groups even at t1 (after VPs, prior to practical training). Self-assessments differed significantly only at t1 in favor of the intervention group.

Conclusions: Training with VPs combined with hands-on training improves PBLS performance as judged by objective measures.

No MeSH data available.