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Comparing Patients' Opinions on the Hospital Discharge Process Collected With a Self-Reported Questionnaire Completed Via the Internet or Through a Telephone Survey: An Ancillary Study of the SENTIPAT Randomized Controlled Trial.

Couturier B, Carrat F, Hejblum G, SENTIPAT Study Gro - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: The response rates for the Internet (39.1%, 168/430) and telephone groups (87.2%, 381/437) differed significantly (P<.001), but their total satisfaction scores did not (P=.08) nor did the satisfaction subscores (P=.58 for discharge logistics organization, P=.12 for preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and P=.35 for patients' impressions at the time of discharge).Nevertheless, collecting patients' opinions on their hospital discharge via the Internet proved operational; study results indicate that conducting such surveys via the Internet yields similar estimates to those obtained via a telephone survey.The results support the establishment of a permanent dedicated website that could also be used to obtain users' opinions on other aspects of their hospital stay and follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Unité de Santé Publique, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France. berengere.couturier@aphp.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hospital discharge, a critical stage in the hospital-to-home transition of patient care, is a complex process with potential dysfunctions having an impact on patients' health on their return home. No study has yet reported the feasibility and usefulness of an information system that would directly collect and transmit, via the Internet, volunteer patients' opinions on their satisfaction concerning the organization of hospital discharge.

Objective: Our primary objective was to compare patients' opinions on the discharge process collected with 2 different methods: self-questionnaire completed on a dedicated website versus a telephone interview. The secondary goal was to estimate patient satisfaction.

Methods: We created a questionnaire to examine hospital discharge according to 3 dimensions: discharge logistics organization, preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and patients' impressions at the time of discharge. A satisfaction score (between 0 and 1) for each of those dimensions and an associated total score were calculated. Taking advantage of the randomized SENTIPAT trial that questioned patients recruited at hospital discharge about the evolution of their health after returning home and randomly assigned them to complete a self-questionnaire directly online or during a telephone interview, we conducted an ancillary study comparing satisfaction with the organization of hospital discharge for these 2 patient groups. The questionnaire was proposed to 1141 patients included in the trial who were hospitalized for ≥2 days, among whom 867 eligible patients had access to the Internet at home and were randomized to the Internet or telephone group.

Results: Of the 1141 patients included, 755 (66.17%) completed the questionnaire. The response rates for the Internet (39.1%, 168/430) and telephone groups (87.2%, 381/437) differed significantly (P<.001), but their total satisfaction scores did not (P=.08) nor did the satisfaction subscores (P=.58 for discharge logistics organization, P=.12 for preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and P=.35 for patients' impressions at the time of discharge). The total satisfaction score (median 0.83, IQR 0.72-0.92) indicated the patients' high satisfaction.

Conclusions: The direct transmission of personal health data via the Internet requires patients' active participation and those planning surveys in the domain explored in this study should anticipate a lower response rate than that issued from a similar survey conducted by telephone interviews. Nevertheless, collecting patients' opinions on their hospital discharge via the Internet proved operational; study results indicate that conducting such surveys via the Internet yields similar estimates to those obtained via a telephone survey. The results support the establishment of a permanent dedicated website that could also be used to obtain users' opinions on other aspects of their hospital stay and follow-up.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01769261; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01769261 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ZDF5bdQb).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of patients with a hospital stay of ≥2 days included in the SENTIPAT trial who responded or not to the discharge questionnaire according to the type of hospitalization and the recruitment unit. IQ: incomplete questionnaires; surgery: general and digestive surgery; infectious: infectious and tropical diseases.
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figure1: Flowchart of patients with a hospital stay of ≥2 days included in the SENTIPAT trial who responded or not to the discharge questionnaire according to the type of hospitalization and the recruitment unit. IQ: incomplete questionnaires; surgery: general and digestive surgery; infectious: infectious and tropical diseases.

Mentions: A total of 755 (66.17%) completed discharge questionnaires were collected from the 1141 patients included after a hospital stay of 2 or more days (Figure 1). The relative contribution of each unit ranged from 13.41% (153/1141) to 35.58% (406/1141) and their response rates did not significantly differ from one unit to another (P=.08) and ranged from 60.3% (132/219) to 70.0% (284/406). Patients’ median age was 55 (IQR 39-66) years and 591 of 1141 (51.80%) were women. Hospitalization lasted a median 6 (IQR 3-10) days (median 7, IQR 4-11 and median 3, IQR 2-3 days for standard and weekday-only hospitalizations, respectively) (Table 2). Responders were significantly older than nonresponders (P<.001) for comparable sex distributions, level of education, and hospitalization durations. Internet, telephone, and noneligible group patients completed the questionnaire within median 6 (IQR 3-16), median 7 (IQR 7-9), and median 7 (IQR 7-8) days postdischarge, respectively, with respective Internet and telephone response rates of 39.1% (168/430) and 87.2% (381/437, P<.001). Noneligible patients were significantly older than telephone patients were (P<.001) and their response rate was significantly lower (75.2%, 206/274 vs 87.2%, 381/437, P<.001).


Comparing Patients' Opinions on the Hospital Discharge Process Collected With a Self-Reported Questionnaire Completed Via the Internet or Through a Telephone Survey: An Ancillary Study of the SENTIPAT Randomized Controlled Trial.

Couturier B, Carrat F, Hejblum G, SENTIPAT Study Gro - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Flowchart of patients with a hospital stay of ≥2 days included in the SENTIPAT trial who responded or not to the discharge questionnaire according to the type of hospitalization and the recruitment unit. IQ: incomplete questionnaires; surgery: general and digestive surgery; infectious: infectious and tropical diseases.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526961&req=5

figure1: Flowchart of patients with a hospital stay of ≥2 days included in the SENTIPAT trial who responded or not to the discharge questionnaire according to the type of hospitalization and the recruitment unit. IQ: incomplete questionnaires; surgery: general and digestive surgery; infectious: infectious and tropical diseases.
Mentions: A total of 755 (66.17%) completed discharge questionnaires were collected from the 1141 patients included after a hospital stay of 2 or more days (Figure 1). The relative contribution of each unit ranged from 13.41% (153/1141) to 35.58% (406/1141) and their response rates did not significantly differ from one unit to another (P=.08) and ranged from 60.3% (132/219) to 70.0% (284/406). Patients’ median age was 55 (IQR 39-66) years and 591 of 1141 (51.80%) were women. Hospitalization lasted a median 6 (IQR 3-10) days (median 7, IQR 4-11 and median 3, IQR 2-3 days for standard and weekday-only hospitalizations, respectively) (Table 2). Responders were significantly older than nonresponders (P<.001) for comparable sex distributions, level of education, and hospitalization durations. Internet, telephone, and noneligible group patients completed the questionnaire within median 6 (IQR 3-16), median 7 (IQR 7-9), and median 7 (IQR 7-8) days postdischarge, respectively, with respective Internet and telephone response rates of 39.1% (168/430) and 87.2% (381/437, P<.001). Noneligible patients were significantly older than telephone patients were (P<.001) and their response rate was significantly lower (75.2%, 206/274 vs 87.2%, 381/437, P<.001).

Bottom Line: The response rates for the Internet (39.1%, 168/430) and telephone groups (87.2%, 381/437) differed significantly (P<.001), but their total satisfaction scores did not (P=.08) nor did the satisfaction subscores (P=.58 for discharge logistics organization, P=.12 for preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and P=.35 for patients' impressions at the time of discharge).Nevertheless, collecting patients' opinions on their hospital discharge via the Internet proved operational; study results indicate that conducting such surveys via the Internet yields similar estimates to those obtained via a telephone survey.The results support the establishment of a permanent dedicated website that could also be used to obtain users' opinions on other aspects of their hospital stay and follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Unité de Santé Publique, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France. berengere.couturier@aphp.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hospital discharge, a critical stage in the hospital-to-home transition of patient care, is a complex process with potential dysfunctions having an impact on patients' health on their return home. No study has yet reported the feasibility and usefulness of an information system that would directly collect and transmit, via the Internet, volunteer patients' opinions on their satisfaction concerning the organization of hospital discharge.

Objective: Our primary objective was to compare patients' opinions on the discharge process collected with 2 different methods: self-questionnaire completed on a dedicated website versus a telephone interview. The secondary goal was to estimate patient satisfaction.

Methods: We created a questionnaire to examine hospital discharge according to 3 dimensions: discharge logistics organization, preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and patients' impressions at the time of discharge. A satisfaction score (between 0 and 1) for each of those dimensions and an associated total score were calculated. Taking advantage of the randomized SENTIPAT trial that questioned patients recruited at hospital discharge about the evolution of their health after returning home and randomly assigned them to complete a self-questionnaire directly online or during a telephone interview, we conducted an ancillary study comparing satisfaction with the organization of hospital discharge for these 2 patient groups. The questionnaire was proposed to 1141 patients included in the trial who were hospitalized for ≥2 days, among whom 867 eligible patients had access to the Internet at home and were randomized to the Internet or telephone group.

Results: Of the 1141 patients included, 755 (66.17%) completed the questionnaire. The response rates for the Internet (39.1%, 168/430) and telephone groups (87.2%, 381/437) differed significantly (P<.001), but their total satisfaction scores did not (P=.08) nor did the satisfaction subscores (P=.58 for discharge logistics organization, P=.12 for preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and P=.35 for patients' impressions at the time of discharge). The total satisfaction score (median 0.83, IQR 0.72-0.92) indicated the patients' high satisfaction.

Conclusions: The direct transmission of personal health data via the Internet requires patients' active participation and those planning surveys in the domain explored in this study should anticipate a lower response rate than that issued from a similar survey conducted by telephone interviews. Nevertheless, collecting patients' opinions on their hospital discharge via the Internet proved operational; study results indicate that conducting such surveys via the Internet yields similar estimates to those obtained via a telephone survey. The results support the establishment of a permanent dedicated website that could also be used to obtain users' opinions on other aspects of their hospital stay and follow-up.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01769261; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01769261 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ZDF5bdQb).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus