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Medical Student and Tutor Perceptions of Video Versus Text in an Interactive Online Virtual Patient for Problem-Based Learning: A Pilot Study.

Woodham LA, Ellaway RH, Round J, Vaughan S, Poulton T, Zary N - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Although some students found some characteristics of the videos beneficial, when asked to express a preference for video or text the majority of those that responded to the question (65%, 65/100) expressed a preference for text.More specifically, the use of video was perceived as beneficial for providing details, visual information, and context where text was unable to do so.This pilot study has provided the foundation for further research into the effectiveness of different virtual patient designs for PBL.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education, St. George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom. lwoodham@sgul.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of the use of video resources in primarily paper-based problem-based learning (PBL) settings has been widely explored. Although it can provide many benefits, the use of video can also hamper the critical thinking of learners in contexts where learners are developing clinical reasoning. However, the use of video has not been explored in the context of interactive virtual patients for PBL.

Objective: A pilot study was conducted to explore how undergraduate medical students interpreted and evaluated information from video- and text-based materials presented in the context of a branched interactive online virtual patient designed for PBL. The goal was to inform the development and use of virtual patients for PBL and to inform future research in this area.

Methods: An existing virtual patient for PBL was adapted for use in video and provided as an intervention to students in the transition year of the undergraduate medicine course at St George's, University of London. Survey instruments were used to capture student and PBL tutor experiences and perceptions of the intervention, and a formative review meeting was run with PBL tutors. Descriptive statistics were generated for the structured responses and a thematic analysis was used to identify emergent themes in the unstructured responses.

Results: Analysis of student responses (n=119) and tutor comments (n=18) yielded 8 distinct themes relating to the perceived educational efficacy of information presented in video and text formats in a PBL context. Although some students found some characteristics of the videos beneficial, when asked to express a preference for video or text the majority of those that responded to the question (65%, 65/100) expressed a preference for text. Student responses indicated that the use of video slowed the pace of PBL and impeded students' ability to review and critically appraise the presented information.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that text was perceived to be a better source of information than video in virtual patients for PBL. More specifically, the use of video was perceived as beneficial for providing details, visual information, and context where text was unable to do so. However, learner acceptance of text was higher in the context of PBL, particularly when targeting clinical reasoning skills. This pilot study has provided the foundation for further research into the effectiveness of different virtual patient designs for PBL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screenshot showing a video clip embedded in the online virtual patient activity used in this study.
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figure2: Screenshot showing a video clip embedded in the online virtual patient activity used in this study.

Mentions: The filming was completed over 2 half-day sessions using volunteer actors and 5 cameras. Four cameras were fixed-viewpoint cameras available in the simulation center, whereas an additional portable camera was used to capture close-up shots and other viewpoints. The simulation center was used to stage scenes representing a recovery room, an operating theater, and a ward environment. Approximately 4 hours of footage was captured from each camera and this was edited down into 9 video clips varying from between 45 seconds to 4 minutes in length. These video clips were then embedded into the virtual patient case, replacing the text in this part of the tutorial. Examples of the video clips are provided in Multimedia Appendices 1 and 2. The video content was reviewed for suitability and accuracy by the academic leads for the relevant module of the course and approved for use. A screenshot of a video in a virtual patient case is shown in Figure 2.


Medical Student and Tutor Perceptions of Video Versus Text in an Interactive Online Virtual Patient for Problem-Based Learning: A Pilot Study.

Woodham LA, Ellaway RH, Round J, Vaughan S, Poulton T, Zary N - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Screenshot showing a video clip embedded in the online virtual patient activity used in this study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526950&req=5

figure2: Screenshot showing a video clip embedded in the online virtual patient activity used in this study.
Mentions: The filming was completed over 2 half-day sessions using volunteer actors and 5 cameras. Four cameras were fixed-viewpoint cameras available in the simulation center, whereas an additional portable camera was used to capture close-up shots and other viewpoints. The simulation center was used to stage scenes representing a recovery room, an operating theater, and a ward environment. Approximately 4 hours of footage was captured from each camera and this was edited down into 9 video clips varying from between 45 seconds to 4 minutes in length. These video clips were then embedded into the virtual patient case, replacing the text in this part of the tutorial. Examples of the video clips are provided in Multimedia Appendices 1 and 2. The video content was reviewed for suitability and accuracy by the academic leads for the relevant module of the course and approved for use. A screenshot of a video in a virtual patient case is shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Although some students found some characteristics of the videos beneficial, when asked to express a preference for video or text the majority of those that responded to the question (65%, 65/100) expressed a preference for text.More specifically, the use of video was perceived as beneficial for providing details, visual information, and context where text was unable to do so.This pilot study has provided the foundation for further research into the effectiveness of different virtual patient designs for PBL.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education, St. George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom. lwoodham@sgul.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of the use of video resources in primarily paper-based problem-based learning (PBL) settings has been widely explored. Although it can provide many benefits, the use of video can also hamper the critical thinking of learners in contexts where learners are developing clinical reasoning. However, the use of video has not been explored in the context of interactive virtual patients for PBL.

Objective: A pilot study was conducted to explore how undergraduate medical students interpreted and evaluated information from video- and text-based materials presented in the context of a branched interactive online virtual patient designed for PBL. The goal was to inform the development and use of virtual patients for PBL and to inform future research in this area.

Methods: An existing virtual patient for PBL was adapted for use in video and provided as an intervention to students in the transition year of the undergraduate medicine course at St George's, University of London. Survey instruments were used to capture student and PBL tutor experiences and perceptions of the intervention, and a formative review meeting was run with PBL tutors. Descriptive statistics were generated for the structured responses and a thematic analysis was used to identify emergent themes in the unstructured responses.

Results: Analysis of student responses (n=119) and tutor comments (n=18) yielded 8 distinct themes relating to the perceived educational efficacy of information presented in video and text formats in a PBL context. Although some students found some characteristics of the videos beneficial, when asked to express a preference for video or text the majority of those that responded to the question (65%, 65/100) expressed a preference for text. Student responses indicated that the use of video slowed the pace of PBL and impeded students' ability to review and critically appraise the presented information.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that text was perceived to be a better source of information than video in virtual patients for PBL. More specifically, the use of video was perceived as beneficial for providing details, visual information, and context where text was unable to do so. However, learner acceptance of text was higher in the context of PBL, particularly when targeting clinical reasoning skills. This pilot study has provided the foundation for further research into the effectiveness of different virtual patient designs for PBL.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus