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ClickDiary: Online Tracking of Health Behaviors and Mood.

Chan TC, Yen TJ, Fu YC, Hwang JS - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home.In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei City, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Traditional studies of health behaviors are typically conducted using one-shot, cross-sectional surveys. Thus, participants' recall bias may undermine the reliability and validity of the data. To capture mood changes and health behaviors in everyday life, we designed an online survey platform, ClickDiary, which helped collect more complete information for comprehensive data analyses.

Objective: We aim to understand whether daily mood changes are related to one's personal characteristics, demographic factors, and daily health behaviors.

Methods: The ClickDiary program uses a Web-based platform to collect data on participants' health behaviors and their social-contact networks. The name ClickDiary comes from the platform's interface, which is designed to allow the users to respond to most of the survey questions simply by clicking on the options provided. Participants were recruited from the general population and came from various backgrounds. To keep the participants motivated and interested, the ClickDiary program included a random drawing for rewards. We used descriptive statistics and the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model for our analysis.

Results: We selected 130 participants who had completed at least 30 days of ClickDiary entries from May 1 to October 31, 2014 as our sample for the study. According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home. In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.

Conclusions: Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood. With the online ClickDiary survey, which reduces the recall biases that are common in traditional one-shot surveys, we were able to collect and analyze the daily variations of each subject's health behaviors and mood status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimates of random effects with 95% confidence intervals for the random components of the 130 individuals representing the participants' threshold deviations in the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure2: Estimates of random effects with 95% confidence intervals for the random components of the 130 individuals representing the participants' threshold deviations in the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model.

Mentions: Some types of diets were positively related to the mood, too. Participants who ate four servings or more of vegetables or fruits had lower odds of reporting a mood status at a level of k or below (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66-0.94, P=.01) than those who did not eat any vegetables or fruits. Eating fewer servings of vegetables or fruits also resulted in lower odds (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71-0.99, P=.04). Those who had two bottles or more of sugary drinks had lower odds compared with those who did not have such drinks (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-0.99, P=.04). Moreover, eating less than one serving of dessert was also marginally associated with daily mood (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.84-1.01, P=.08). One surprising finding was that taking at least one serving of fried food was also linked to a somewhat better mood (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85-1.00, P=.04). Participants tended to have lower odds of reporting their mood status at a level of k or below on weekends (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.78-0.90, P<.001). Traveling away from home by at least 50 kilometers was associated with significantly lower odds (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.62-0.83, P<.001), as was traveling 10 to 49 kilometers away (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77-0.96, P=.006). As expected, people who did not suffer from any symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) tended to experience a better mood (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.82-0.98, P=.02).The variance estimate, σ2a=0.327, for the random components representing variation of these thresholds among the n individuals, was not negligible. As shown in Figure 2, we saw a lot of random-effect estimates of this variance component deviated away from the zero mean. This indicates that there is still some uncertainty that remains unexplained by the covariates considered in the model. The estimate of variance, σ2b, for the other four variance components was 1.587. This result was expected because participants’ reports on mood status were affected by their previous reports to various degrees, as shown in Table 5.


ClickDiary: Online Tracking of Health Behaviors and Mood.

Chan TC, Yen TJ, Fu YC, Hwang JS - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Estimates of random effects with 95% confidence intervals for the random components of the 130 individuals representing the participants' threshold deviations in the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526938&req=5

figure2: Estimates of random effects with 95% confidence intervals for the random components of the 130 individuals representing the participants' threshold deviations in the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model.
Mentions: Some types of diets were positively related to the mood, too. Participants who ate four servings or more of vegetables or fruits had lower odds of reporting a mood status at a level of k or below (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66-0.94, P=.01) than those who did not eat any vegetables or fruits. Eating fewer servings of vegetables or fruits also resulted in lower odds (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71-0.99, P=.04). Those who had two bottles or more of sugary drinks had lower odds compared with those who did not have such drinks (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-0.99, P=.04). Moreover, eating less than one serving of dessert was also marginally associated with daily mood (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.84-1.01, P=.08). One surprising finding was that taking at least one serving of fried food was also linked to a somewhat better mood (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85-1.00, P=.04). Participants tended to have lower odds of reporting their mood status at a level of k or below on weekends (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.78-0.90, P<.001). Traveling away from home by at least 50 kilometers was associated with significantly lower odds (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.62-0.83, P<.001), as was traveling 10 to 49 kilometers away (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77-0.96, P=.006). As expected, people who did not suffer from any symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) tended to experience a better mood (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.82-0.98, P=.02).The variance estimate, σ2a=0.327, for the random components representing variation of these thresholds among the n individuals, was not negligible. As shown in Figure 2, we saw a lot of random-effect estimates of this variance component deviated away from the zero mean. This indicates that there is still some uncertainty that remains unexplained by the covariates considered in the model. The estimate of variance, σ2b, for the other four variance components was 1.587. This result was expected because participants’ reports on mood status were affected by their previous reports to various degrees, as shown in Table 5.

Bottom Line: According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home.In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei City, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Traditional studies of health behaviors are typically conducted using one-shot, cross-sectional surveys. Thus, participants' recall bias may undermine the reliability and validity of the data. To capture mood changes and health behaviors in everyday life, we designed an online survey platform, ClickDiary, which helped collect more complete information for comprehensive data analyses.

Objective: We aim to understand whether daily mood changes are related to one's personal characteristics, demographic factors, and daily health behaviors.

Methods: The ClickDiary program uses a Web-based platform to collect data on participants' health behaviors and their social-contact networks. The name ClickDiary comes from the platform's interface, which is designed to allow the users to respond to most of the survey questions simply by clicking on the options provided. Participants were recruited from the general population and came from various backgrounds. To keep the participants motivated and interested, the ClickDiary program included a random drawing for rewards. We used descriptive statistics and the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model for our analysis.

Results: We selected 130 participants who had completed at least 30 days of ClickDiary entries from May 1 to October 31, 2014 as our sample for the study. According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home. In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.

Conclusions: Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood. With the online ClickDiary survey, which reduces the recall biases that are common in traditional one-shot surveys, we were able to collect and analyze the daily variations of each subject's health behaviors and mood status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus