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ClickDiary: Online Tracking of Health Behaviors and Mood.

Chan TC, Yen TJ, Fu YC, Hwang JS - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home.In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei City, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Traditional studies of health behaviors are typically conducted using one-shot, cross-sectional surveys. Thus, participants' recall bias may undermine the reliability and validity of the data. To capture mood changes and health behaviors in everyday life, we designed an online survey platform, ClickDiary, which helped collect more complete information for comprehensive data analyses.

Objective: We aim to understand whether daily mood changes are related to one's personal characteristics, demographic factors, and daily health behaviors.

Methods: The ClickDiary program uses a Web-based platform to collect data on participants' health behaviors and their social-contact networks. The name ClickDiary comes from the platform's interface, which is designed to allow the users to respond to most of the survey questions simply by clicking on the options provided. Participants were recruited from the general population and came from various backgrounds. To keep the participants motivated and interested, the ClickDiary program included a random drawing for rewards. We used descriptive statistics and the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model for our analysis.

Results: We selected 130 participants who had completed at least 30 days of ClickDiary entries from May 1 to October 31, 2014 as our sample for the study. According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home. In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.

Conclusions: Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood. With the online ClickDiary survey, which reduces the recall biases that are common in traditional one-shot surveys, we were able to collect and analyze the daily variations of each subject's health behaviors and mood status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screenshots of ClickDiary. (A) Home page; (B) The interface of the health diary.
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figure1: Screenshots of ClickDiary. (A) Home page; (B) The interface of the health diary.

Mentions: The ClickDiary program uses a Web-based platform [20] (see Figure 1, section A) to collect data on participants’ health behaviors and their social-contact networks. The interface of ClickDiary is designed so that users can input their responses by clicking options in the instrument, making it easier to record responses on a daily basis (see Figure 1, section B). At this stage, this program is specifically tailored to the Taiwanese population. The program is unlike traditional cross-sectional health behavior surveys [21] or one-shot paper-and-pencil contact surveys [15,16]. In addition to being user friendly, the ClickDiary program helps generate daily, real-time, longitudinal data. After participants successfully sign up for their accounts, they are asked to provide demographic information, including age, gender, place of residence, marital status, and current job. The program also collects the Big Five personality traits—openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, neuroticism (OCEAN) [14,22], whose exact wording was taken from the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) [23]—height and weight for calculating body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), perceived health status and happiness, the number (and characteristics) of people contacted during the day, and a baseline health survey, which borrows items from the Taiwan Social Change Survey [24]. After giving such basic information, participants can then proceed to fill out their health diary and contact diary. A reward system serves as incentive for the participants to keep both diaries at least three times a week. In the following sections we introduce our health diary, recruitment methods, quality-control process, reward system, and feedback design.


ClickDiary: Online Tracking of Health Behaviors and Mood.

Chan TC, Yen TJ, Fu YC, Hwang JS - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Screenshots of ClickDiary. (A) Home page; (B) The interface of the health diary.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526938&req=5

figure1: Screenshots of ClickDiary. (A) Home page; (B) The interface of the health diary.
Mentions: The ClickDiary program uses a Web-based platform [20] (see Figure 1, section A) to collect data on participants’ health behaviors and their social-contact networks. The interface of ClickDiary is designed so that users can input their responses by clicking options in the instrument, making it easier to record responses on a daily basis (see Figure 1, section B). At this stage, this program is specifically tailored to the Taiwanese population. The program is unlike traditional cross-sectional health behavior surveys [21] or one-shot paper-and-pencil contact surveys [15,16]. In addition to being user friendly, the ClickDiary program helps generate daily, real-time, longitudinal data. After participants successfully sign up for their accounts, they are asked to provide demographic information, including age, gender, place of residence, marital status, and current job. The program also collects the Big Five personality traits—openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, neuroticism (OCEAN) [14,22], whose exact wording was taken from the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) [23]—height and weight for calculating body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), perceived health status and happiness, the number (and characteristics) of people contacted during the day, and a baseline health survey, which borrows items from the Taiwan Social Change Survey [24]. After giving such basic information, participants can then proceed to fill out their health diary and contact diary. A reward system serves as incentive for the participants to keep both diaries at least three times a week. In the following sections we introduce our health diary, recruitment methods, quality-control process, reward system, and feedback design.

Bottom Line: According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home.In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei City, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Traditional studies of health behaviors are typically conducted using one-shot, cross-sectional surveys. Thus, participants' recall bias may undermine the reliability and validity of the data. To capture mood changes and health behaviors in everyday life, we designed an online survey platform, ClickDiary, which helped collect more complete information for comprehensive data analyses.

Objective: We aim to understand whether daily mood changes are related to one's personal characteristics, demographic factors, and daily health behaviors.

Methods: The ClickDiary program uses a Web-based platform to collect data on participants' health behaviors and their social-contact networks. The name ClickDiary comes from the platform's interface, which is designed to allow the users to respond to most of the survey questions simply by clicking on the options provided. Participants were recruited from the general population and came from various backgrounds. To keep the participants motivated and interested, the ClickDiary program included a random drawing for rewards. We used descriptive statistics and the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model for our analysis.

Results: We selected 130 participants who had completed at least 30 days of ClickDiary entries from May 1 to October 31, 2014 as our sample for the study. According to the results of the multilevel proportional-odds mixed model, a person tended to be in a better mood on a given day if he or she ate more fruits and vegetables, took in more sugary drinks, ate more fried foods, showed no cold symptoms, slept better, exercised longer, and traveled farther away from home. In addition, participants were generally in a better mood during the weekend than on weekdays.

Conclusions: Sleeping well, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising longer each day all appear to put one in a better mood. With the online ClickDiary survey, which reduces the recall biases that are common in traditional one-shot surveys, we were able to collect and analyze the daily variations of each subject's health behaviors and mood status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus