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Modulation of Arabidopsis and monocot root architecture by CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION 26 peptide.

Czyzewicz N, Shi CL, Vu LD, Van De Cotte B, Hodgman C, Butenko MA, Smet ID - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Using chemically synthesized peptide variants, it was found that CLE26 plays an important role in regulating A. thaliana root architecture and interacts with auxin signalling.In addition, through alanine scanning and in silico structural modelling, key residues in the CLE26 peptide sequence that affect its activity are pinpointed.Finally, some interesting similarities and differences regarding the role of CLE26 in regulating monocot root architecture are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plant and Crop Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.

No MeSH data available.


CLE26p and ARF7−ARF19. (A) ARF7 and ARF19 expression as determined by qPCR in 7-day-old seedling roots treated with 1 μM CLE26p for 24h. The bar graph indicates the mean ±SE. (B–E) Root phenotype of CLE26p-treated Col-0 and arf7arf19 at 9 d after germination. Representative pictures (B) and quantification of primary root length (C) and emerged lateral root density (D). The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with no peptide treatment: *P<0.05. Scale bar=1cm (B) and 100 μm (E). (E) Detail of lateral root positions (asterisk) and density in Col-0 and arf7arf19 following peptide treatment. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Figure 9: CLE26p and ARF7−ARF19. (A) ARF7 and ARF19 expression as determined by qPCR in 7-day-old seedling roots treated with 1 μM CLE26p for 24h. The bar graph indicates the mean ±SE. (B–E) Root phenotype of CLE26p-treated Col-0 and arf7arf19 at 9 d after germination. Representative pictures (B) and quantification of primary root length (C) and emerged lateral root density (D). The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with no peptide treatment: *P<0.05. Scale bar=1cm (B) and 100 μm (E). (E) Detail of lateral root positions (asterisk) and density in Col-0 and arf7arf19 following peptide treatment. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: Finally, it was analysed whether CLE26p acts upstream or downstream of the ARF7–ARF19 module, a major regulator of lateral root development (Lavenus et al., 2013). For this, the impact of CLE26p treatment on ARF7 and ARF19 expression was tested using qPCR. In CLE26p-treated roots, the ARF7 and ARF19 expression levels are not significantly affected (Fig. 9A). Subsequently, the effect of CLE26p treatment on arf7arf19 was tested. Interestingly, the lateral rootless arf7arf19 double mutant was partially insensitive to CLE26p with respect to primary root length, but displayed a limited—often closely grouped—number of lateral roots upon CLE26p treatment (Fig. 9B–E). In conclusion, on the one hand, CLE26p appears to require an ARF7- and ARF19-dependent auxin response for its activity, but, on the other hand, it appears to be able to induce lateral root development in arf7arf19. These two—seemingly opposing—effects can possibly be reconciled through a CLE26-mediated perturbation of auxin transport and accumulation.


Modulation of Arabidopsis and monocot root architecture by CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION 26 peptide.

Czyzewicz N, Shi CL, Vu LD, Van De Cotte B, Hodgman C, Butenko MA, Smet ID - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

CLE26p and ARF7−ARF19. (A) ARF7 and ARF19 expression as determined by qPCR in 7-day-old seedling roots treated with 1 μM CLE26p for 24h. The bar graph indicates the mean ±SE. (B–E) Root phenotype of CLE26p-treated Col-0 and arf7arf19 at 9 d after germination. Representative pictures (B) and quantification of primary root length (C) and emerged lateral root density (D). The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with no peptide treatment: *P<0.05. Scale bar=1cm (B) and 100 μm (E). (E) Detail of lateral root positions (asterisk) and density in Col-0 and arf7arf19 following peptide treatment. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526925&req=5

Figure 9: CLE26p and ARF7−ARF19. (A) ARF7 and ARF19 expression as determined by qPCR in 7-day-old seedling roots treated with 1 μM CLE26p for 24h. The bar graph indicates the mean ±SE. (B–E) Root phenotype of CLE26p-treated Col-0 and arf7arf19 at 9 d after germination. Representative pictures (B) and quantification of primary root length (C) and emerged lateral root density (D). The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with no peptide treatment: *P<0.05. Scale bar=1cm (B) and 100 μm (E). (E) Detail of lateral root positions (asterisk) and density in Col-0 and arf7arf19 following peptide treatment. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: Finally, it was analysed whether CLE26p acts upstream or downstream of the ARF7–ARF19 module, a major regulator of lateral root development (Lavenus et al., 2013). For this, the impact of CLE26p treatment on ARF7 and ARF19 expression was tested using qPCR. In CLE26p-treated roots, the ARF7 and ARF19 expression levels are not significantly affected (Fig. 9A). Subsequently, the effect of CLE26p treatment on arf7arf19 was tested. Interestingly, the lateral rootless arf7arf19 double mutant was partially insensitive to CLE26p with respect to primary root length, but displayed a limited—often closely grouped—number of lateral roots upon CLE26p treatment (Fig. 9B–E). In conclusion, on the one hand, CLE26p appears to require an ARF7- and ARF19-dependent auxin response for its activity, but, on the other hand, it appears to be able to induce lateral root development in arf7arf19. These two—seemingly opposing—effects can possibly be reconciled through a CLE26-mediated perturbation of auxin transport and accumulation.

Bottom Line: Using chemically synthesized peptide variants, it was found that CLE26 plays an important role in regulating A. thaliana root architecture and interacts with auxin signalling.In addition, through alanine scanning and in silico structural modelling, key residues in the CLE26 peptide sequence that affect its activity are pinpointed.Finally, some interesting similarities and differences regarding the role of CLE26 in regulating monocot root architecture are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plant and Crop Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.

No MeSH data available.