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Modulation of Arabidopsis and monocot root architecture by CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION 26 peptide.

Czyzewicz N, Shi CL, Vu LD, Van De Cotte B, Hodgman C, Butenko MA, Smet ID - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Using chemically synthesized peptide variants, it was found that CLE26 plays an important role in regulating A. thaliana root architecture and interacts with auxin signalling.In addition, through alanine scanning and in silico structural modelling, key residues in the CLE26 peptide sequence that affect its activity are pinpointed.Finally, some interesting similarities and differences regarding the role of CLE26 in regulating monocot root architecture are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plant and Crop Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.

No MeSH data available.


CLE peptide treatment of A. thaliana. (A) Sequence of synthetic CLE peptides used. (B–G) Treatment of wild-type seedlings with 10 μM (B, C) or 10nM CLE peptide (E–G). Representative pictures of CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings at 12 d after germination (B and E). Quantification of primary root length (C and F) and emerged lateral root density (D and G) for CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings. The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with the no peptide treatment is indicated: ***P<0.01. Scale bar=1cm. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Figure 2: CLE peptide treatment of A. thaliana. (A) Sequence of synthetic CLE peptides used. (B–G) Treatment of wild-type seedlings with 10 μM (B, C) or 10nM CLE peptide (E–G). Representative pictures of CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings at 12 d after germination (B and E). Quantification of primary root length (C and F) and emerged lateral root density (D and G) for CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings. The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with the no peptide treatment is indicated: ***P<0.01. Scale bar=1cm. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: To characterize further the involvement of CLE genes with an interesting lateral root-associated expression pattern and/or a regulation by hormonal or environmental triggers, chemically synthesized CLE peptides (CLEps) corresponding to the predicted products of the respective A. thaliana CLE genes (AtCLEp, referred to as CLEp) were used. CLE1p, CLE4p, CLE7p, CLE26p, and CLE27p were selected but, since CLE1 and CLE4 have the same mature peptide sequence, they were represented by one synthetic peptide (CLE1/CLE4p) (Fig. 2A). Based on their expression patterns, a repressive (CLE1, CLE4, and CLE7) or inductive effect on lateral root development (CLE26 and CLE27) was hypothesized for the selected peptides. To test the biological activity of the chemically synthesized peptides, initially a high concentration (compared with likely normal physiological conditions) of 10 μM CLEp was applied to wild-type A. thaliana seedlings. This revealed a significant effect of all assayed CLE peptides, namely decreased primary root length (between a 76% and 94% decrease), decreased lateral root number (between a 57% and 88% decrease), and increased lateral root density (between a 98% and 179% increase) (Fig. 2B–D; Supplementary Fig. S5 at JXB online). The decrease in primary root length was predictable, since overexpression of CLE genes or application of chemically synthesized CLE peptides often results in consumption of the root apical meristem and/or a short primary root, and is possibly a non-specific response to high concentrations of exogenously applied peptide (Casamitjana-Martinez et al., 2003; Fiers et al., 2005; Kinoshita et al., 2007; Jun et al., 2010; Depuydt et al., 2013). In addition, the increased lateral root density by CLE1, CLE4, and CLE7 is in contrast to the hypothesized effect, namely a decrease in lateral root development. It is, however, possible that the increased lateral root density is a consequence of the dramatically reduced primary root growth.


Modulation of Arabidopsis and monocot root architecture by CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION 26 peptide.

Czyzewicz N, Shi CL, Vu LD, Van De Cotte B, Hodgman C, Butenko MA, Smet ID - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

CLE peptide treatment of A. thaliana. (A) Sequence of synthetic CLE peptides used. (B–G) Treatment of wild-type seedlings with 10 μM (B, C) or 10nM CLE peptide (E–G). Representative pictures of CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings at 12 d after germination (B and E). Quantification of primary root length (C and F) and emerged lateral root density (D and G) for CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings. The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with the no peptide treatment is indicated: ***P<0.01. Scale bar=1cm. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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Figure 2: CLE peptide treatment of A. thaliana. (A) Sequence of synthetic CLE peptides used. (B–G) Treatment of wild-type seedlings with 10 μM (B, C) or 10nM CLE peptide (E–G). Representative pictures of CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings at 12 d after germination (B and E). Quantification of primary root length (C and F) and emerged lateral root density (D and G) for CLE26p-treated wild-type seedlings. The bar graphs indicate the mean ±SE. Statistical significance (Student’s t-test) compared with the no peptide treatment is indicated: ***P<0.01. Scale bar=1cm. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: To characterize further the involvement of CLE genes with an interesting lateral root-associated expression pattern and/or a regulation by hormonal or environmental triggers, chemically synthesized CLE peptides (CLEps) corresponding to the predicted products of the respective A. thaliana CLE genes (AtCLEp, referred to as CLEp) were used. CLE1p, CLE4p, CLE7p, CLE26p, and CLE27p were selected but, since CLE1 and CLE4 have the same mature peptide sequence, they were represented by one synthetic peptide (CLE1/CLE4p) (Fig. 2A). Based on their expression patterns, a repressive (CLE1, CLE4, and CLE7) or inductive effect on lateral root development (CLE26 and CLE27) was hypothesized for the selected peptides. To test the biological activity of the chemically synthesized peptides, initially a high concentration (compared with likely normal physiological conditions) of 10 μM CLEp was applied to wild-type A. thaliana seedlings. This revealed a significant effect of all assayed CLE peptides, namely decreased primary root length (between a 76% and 94% decrease), decreased lateral root number (between a 57% and 88% decrease), and increased lateral root density (between a 98% and 179% increase) (Fig. 2B–D; Supplementary Fig. S5 at JXB online). The decrease in primary root length was predictable, since overexpression of CLE genes or application of chemically synthesized CLE peptides often results in consumption of the root apical meristem and/or a short primary root, and is possibly a non-specific response to high concentrations of exogenously applied peptide (Casamitjana-Martinez et al., 2003; Fiers et al., 2005; Kinoshita et al., 2007; Jun et al., 2010; Depuydt et al., 2013). In addition, the increased lateral root density by CLE1, CLE4, and CLE7 is in contrast to the hypothesized effect, namely a decrease in lateral root development. It is, however, possible that the increased lateral root density is a consequence of the dramatically reduced primary root growth.

Bottom Line: Using chemically synthesized peptide variants, it was found that CLE26 plays an important role in regulating A. thaliana root architecture and interacts with auxin signalling.In addition, through alanine scanning and in silico structural modelling, key residues in the CLE26 peptide sequence that affect its activity are pinpointed.Finally, some interesting similarities and differences regarding the role of CLE26 in regulating monocot root architecture are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plant and Crop Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.

No MeSH data available.