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The Arabidopsis Pep-PEPR system is induced by herbivore feeding and contributes to JA-mediated plant defence against herbivory.

Klauser D, Desurmont GA, Glauser G, Vallat A, Flury P, Boller T, Turlings TC, Bartels S - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: By using Arabidopsis GUS-reporter lines, it is now shown that the promoters of both Pep-receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2, as well as PROPEP3 are strongly activated upon herbivore attack.Moreover, pepr1 pepr2 double mutant plants, which are insensitive to Peps, display a reduced resistance to feeding Spodoptera littoralis larvae and a reduced accumulation of jasmonic acid upon exposure to herbivore oral secretions.Taken together, these lines of evidence extend the role of the AtPep-PEPR system as a danger detection mechanism from microbial pathogens to herbivores and further underline its strong interaction with jasmonic acid signalling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zürich-Basel Plant Science Center, University of Basel, Department of Environmental Sciences, Botany, Hebelstrasse 1, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The promoters of PEPR1, PEPR2, and PROPEP3 are activated independently of feeding behaviour and specification of the feeding herbivore. Leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing pPEPR::GUS and pPROPEP3::GUS reporter constructs were either wounded using cork borers or exposed to feeding insects. After 12h, they were detached from the plant, fixed, and stained. The following insects were assessed (from the top): Spodoptera littoralis (generalist, chewing), Pieris brassicae (specialist, chewing), Phaedon cochlearieae (specialist, chewing), and Thrips tabaci (generalist, sucking).
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Figure 3: The promoters of PEPR1, PEPR2, and PROPEP3 are activated independently of feeding behaviour and specification of the feeding herbivore. Leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing pPEPR::GUS and pPROPEP3::GUS reporter constructs were either wounded using cork borers or exposed to feeding insects. After 12h, they were detached from the plant, fixed, and stained. The following insects were assessed (from the top): Spodoptera littoralis (generalist, chewing), Pieris brassicae (specialist, chewing), Phaedon cochlearieae (specialist, chewing), and Thrips tabaci (generalist, sucking).

Mentions: It was notable that the activation of PEPR promoters was not limited to feeding of S. littoralis. A variety of herbivores were tested on our promPEPR-GUS lines and GUS staining was found in all cases, whereas sterile wounding did not lead to detectable GUS staining (Fig 3). This was independent of the herbivores mode of attack as sucking herbivores such as thrips (T. tabaci) were also included, as well as whether the attackers were displaying a generalist (S. littoralis) or specialist feeding behaviour (e.g. P. cochleariae or P. brassicae). Overall, these findings further underline the importance of the Pep-PEPR system for herbivore resistance.


The Arabidopsis Pep-PEPR system is induced by herbivore feeding and contributes to JA-mediated plant defence against herbivory.

Klauser D, Desurmont GA, Glauser G, Vallat A, Flury P, Boller T, Turlings TC, Bartels S - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

The promoters of PEPR1, PEPR2, and PROPEP3 are activated independently of feeding behaviour and specification of the feeding herbivore. Leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing pPEPR::GUS and pPROPEP3::GUS reporter constructs were either wounded using cork borers or exposed to feeding insects. After 12h, they were detached from the plant, fixed, and stained. The following insects were assessed (from the top): Spodoptera littoralis (generalist, chewing), Pieris brassicae (specialist, chewing), Phaedon cochlearieae (specialist, chewing), and Thrips tabaci (generalist, sucking).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526914&req=5

Figure 3: The promoters of PEPR1, PEPR2, and PROPEP3 are activated independently of feeding behaviour and specification of the feeding herbivore. Leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing pPEPR::GUS and pPROPEP3::GUS reporter constructs were either wounded using cork borers or exposed to feeding insects. After 12h, they were detached from the plant, fixed, and stained. The following insects were assessed (from the top): Spodoptera littoralis (generalist, chewing), Pieris brassicae (specialist, chewing), Phaedon cochlearieae (specialist, chewing), and Thrips tabaci (generalist, sucking).
Mentions: It was notable that the activation of PEPR promoters was not limited to feeding of S. littoralis. A variety of herbivores were tested on our promPEPR-GUS lines and GUS staining was found in all cases, whereas sterile wounding did not lead to detectable GUS staining (Fig 3). This was independent of the herbivores mode of attack as sucking herbivores such as thrips (T. tabaci) were also included, as well as whether the attackers were displaying a generalist (S. littoralis) or specialist feeding behaviour (e.g. P. cochleariae or P. brassicae). Overall, these findings further underline the importance of the Pep-PEPR system for herbivore resistance.

Bottom Line: By using Arabidopsis GUS-reporter lines, it is now shown that the promoters of both Pep-receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2, as well as PROPEP3 are strongly activated upon herbivore attack.Moreover, pepr1 pepr2 double mutant plants, which are insensitive to Peps, display a reduced resistance to feeding Spodoptera littoralis larvae and a reduced accumulation of jasmonic acid upon exposure to herbivore oral secretions.Taken together, these lines of evidence extend the role of the AtPep-PEPR system as a danger detection mechanism from microbial pathogens to herbivores and further underline its strong interaction with jasmonic acid signalling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Zürich-Basel Plant Science Center, University of Basel, Department of Environmental Sciences, Botany, Hebelstrasse 1, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus