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Feasibility of a dynamic web guidance approach for personalized physical activity prescription based on daily information from wearable technology.

Coolbaugh CL, Raymond SC, Hawkins DA - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Bottom Line: Computer tailored, Web-based interventions have emerged as an effective approach to promote physical activity.The PPAP app successfully created daily, personalized physical activity prescriptions and an interactive Web environment to guide and promote physical activity by the participants.Data obtained during a 12-week feasibility study demonstrated the ability of the PPAP app to use objective AM data to create daily, personalized physical activity guidance, provide interactive feedback to users, and enable remote administrative monitoring of data quality and subject compliance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California - Davis, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Computer tailored, Web-based interventions have emerged as an effective approach to promote physical activity. Existing programs, however, do not adjust activities according to the participant's compliance or physiologic adaptations, which may increase risk of injury and program attrition in sedentary adults. To address this limitation, objective activity monitor (AM) and heart rate data could be used to guide personalization of physical activity, but improved Web-based frameworks are needed to test such interventions.

Objective: The objective of this study is to (1) develop a personalized physical activity prescription (PPAP) app that combines dynamic Web-based guidance with multi-sensor AM data to promote physical activity and (2) to assess the feasibility of using this system in the field.

Methods: The PPAP app was constructed using an open-source software platform and a custom, multi-sensor AM capable of accurately measuring heart rate and physical activity. A novel algorithm was written to use a participant's compliance and physiologic response to aerobic training (ie, changes in daily resting heart rate) recorded by the AM to create daily, personalized physical activity prescriptions. In addition, the PPAP app was designed to (1) manage the transfer of files from the AM to data processing software and a relational database, (2) provide interactive visualization features such as calendars and training tables to encourage physical activity, and (3) enable remote administrative monitoring of data quality and participant compliance. A 12-week feasibility study was performed to assess the utility and limitations of the PPAP app used by sedentary adults in the field. Changes in physical activity level and resting heart rate were monitored throughout the intervention.

Results: The PPAP app successfully created daily, personalized physical activity prescriptions and an interactive Web environment to guide and promote physical activity by the participants. The varied compliance of the participants enabled evaluation of administrative features of the app including the generation of automated email reminders, participation surveys, and daily AM file upload logs.

Conclusions: This study describes the development of the PPAP app, a closed-loop technology framework that enables personalized physical activity prescription and remote monitoring of an individual's compliance and health response to the intervention. Data obtained during a 12-week feasibility study demonstrated the ability of the PPAP app to use objective AM data to create daily, personalized physical activity guidance, provide interactive feedback to users, and enable remote administrative monitoring of data quality and subject compliance. Using this approach, public health professionals, clinicians, and researchers can adapt the PPAP app to facilitate a range of personalized physical activity interventions to improve health outcomes, assess injury risk, and achieve fitness performance goals in diverse populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of physical activity and resting heart rate data recorded for two subjects during the 12-week PPAP application feasibility study. Completed TRIMP values for S1 demonstrated strong adherence to the recommended physical activity prescription (A). Observed (filled circles) and 10-day moving average (solid line) HRrest for S1 demonstrated a downward trend during the 12-week intervention (B). S2 progressed into week 4 of the intervention, but he did not achieve 70% of the recommended weekly physical activity duration for the subsequent weeks (C). Despite poor adherence to the program, the intervention progressed in week 12 to initiate an EFT. Email reminders were sent at the start of week 5 and 8, and S2 had limited computer access for weeks 9-12. A reminder was not sent for week 6 because S2 uploaded heart rate files to the server (D).
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figure5: Comparison of physical activity and resting heart rate data recorded for two subjects during the 12-week PPAP application feasibility study. Completed TRIMP values for S1 demonstrated strong adherence to the recommended physical activity prescription (A). Observed (filled circles) and 10-day moving average (solid line) HRrest for S1 demonstrated a downward trend during the 12-week intervention (B). S2 progressed into week 4 of the intervention, but he did not achieve 70% of the recommended weekly physical activity duration for the subsequent weeks (C). Despite poor adherence to the program, the intervention progressed in week 12 to initiate an EFT. Email reminders were sent at the start of week 5 and 8, and S2 had limited computer access for weeks 9-12. A reminder was not sent for week 6 because S2 uploaded heart rate files to the server (D).

Mentions: The two subjects (S1 and S2) demonstrated divergent adherence patterns to the PPAP intervention. S1 demonstrated excellent adherence to recommended physical activities progressing into week 10 of the standard physical activity training plan. Due to a late file upload after the end of week 9, S1 did not pass the compliance checkpoint (< 70% duration) resulting in the repeated prescription of week 9. He also did not pass the compliance check for week 11; however, the intervention was advanced to week 12 to initiate the prescription of the 12-minute run/walk EFT. S1 completed the 12-minute run/walk EFT achieving a distance of 2253m or an estimated peak oxygen consumption rate (V̇O2peak) of 48.5 ml·kg-1·min-1[45]. Comparison of recommended and completed TRIMP values (Figure 5A) indicated that S1 was able to achieve the recommended duration and intensity until weeks 9 and 10. At this point, S1 completed the appropriate physical activity duration, but his average heart rate during the endurance portion of the activity session was greater than the recommended target heart rate zone. Average resting heart rate data (Figure 5B) demonstrated a downward trend over the 12 weeks.


Feasibility of a dynamic web guidance approach for personalized physical activity prescription based on daily information from wearable technology.

Coolbaugh CL, Raymond SC, Hawkins DA - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Comparison of physical activity and resting heart rate data recorded for two subjects during the 12-week PPAP application feasibility study. Completed TRIMP values for S1 demonstrated strong adherence to the recommended physical activity prescription (A). Observed (filled circles) and 10-day moving average (solid line) HRrest for S1 demonstrated a downward trend during the 12-week intervention (B). S2 progressed into week 4 of the intervention, but he did not achieve 70% of the recommended weekly physical activity duration for the subsequent weeks (C). Despite poor adherence to the program, the intervention progressed in week 12 to initiate an EFT. Email reminders were sent at the start of week 5 and 8, and S2 had limited computer access for weeks 9-12. A reminder was not sent for week 6 because S2 uploaded heart rate files to the server (D).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526908&req=5

figure5: Comparison of physical activity and resting heart rate data recorded for two subjects during the 12-week PPAP application feasibility study. Completed TRIMP values for S1 demonstrated strong adherence to the recommended physical activity prescription (A). Observed (filled circles) and 10-day moving average (solid line) HRrest for S1 demonstrated a downward trend during the 12-week intervention (B). S2 progressed into week 4 of the intervention, but he did not achieve 70% of the recommended weekly physical activity duration for the subsequent weeks (C). Despite poor adherence to the program, the intervention progressed in week 12 to initiate an EFT. Email reminders were sent at the start of week 5 and 8, and S2 had limited computer access for weeks 9-12. A reminder was not sent for week 6 because S2 uploaded heart rate files to the server (D).
Mentions: The two subjects (S1 and S2) demonstrated divergent adherence patterns to the PPAP intervention. S1 demonstrated excellent adherence to recommended physical activities progressing into week 10 of the standard physical activity training plan. Due to a late file upload after the end of week 9, S1 did not pass the compliance checkpoint (< 70% duration) resulting in the repeated prescription of week 9. He also did not pass the compliance check for week 11; however, the intervention was advanced to week 12 to initiate the prescription of the 12-minute run/walk EFT. S1 completed the 12-minute run/walk EFT achieving a distance of 2253m or an estimated peak oxygen consumption rate (V̇O2peak) of 48.5 ml·kg-1·min-1[45]. Comparison of recommended and completed TRIMP values (Figure 5A) indicated that S1 was able to achieve the recommended duration and intensity until weeks 9 and 10. At this point, S1 completed the appropriate physical activity duration, but his average heart rate during the endurance portion of the activity session was greater than the recommended target heart rate zone. Average resting heart rate data (Figure 5B) demonstrated a downward trend over the 12 weeks.

Bottom Line: Computer tailored, Web-based interventions have emerged as an effective approach to promote physical activity.The PPAP app successfully created daily, personalized physical activity prescriptions and an interactive Web environment to guide and promote physical activity by the participants.Data obtained during a 12-week feasibility study demonstrated the ability of the PPAP app to use objective AM data to create daily, personalized physical activity guidance, provide interactive feedback to users, and enable remote administrative monitoring of data quality and subject compliance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California - Davis, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Computer tailored, Web-based interventions have emerged as an effective approach to promote physical activity. Existing programs, however, do not adjust activities according to the participant's compliance or physiologic adaptations, which may increase risk of injury and program attrition in sedentary adults. To address this limitation, objective activity monitor (AM) and heart rate data could be used to guide personalization of physical activity, but improved Web-based frameworks are needed to test such interventions.

Objective: The objective of this study is to (1) develop a personalized physical activity prescription (PPAP) app that combines dynamic Web-based guidance with multi-sensor AM data to promote physical activity and (2) to assess the feasibility of using this system in the field.

Methods: The PPAP app was constructed using an open-source software platform and a custom, multi-sensor AM capable of accurately measuring heart rate and physical activity. A novel algorithm was written to use a participant's compliance and physiologic response to aerobic training (ie, changes in daily resting heart rate) recorded by the AM to create daily, personalized physical activity prescriptions. In addition, the PPAP app was designed to (1) manage the transfer of files from the AM to data processing software and a relational database, (2) provide interactive visualization features such as calendars and training tables to encourage physical activity, and (3) enable remote administrative monitoring of data quality and participant compliance. A 12-week feasibility study was performed to assess the utility and limitations of the PPAP app used by sedentary adults in the field. Changes in physical activity level and resting heart rate were monitored throughout the intervention.

Results: The PPAP app successfully created daily, personalized physical activity prescriptions and an interactive Web environment to guide and promote physical activity by the participants. The varied compliance of the participants enabled evaluation of administrative features of the app including the generation of automated email reminders, participation surveys, and daily AM file upload logs.

Conclusions: This study describes the development of the PPAP app, a closed-loop technology framework that enables personalized physical activity prescription and remote monitoring of an individual's compliance and health response to the intervention. Data obtained during a 12-week feasibility study demonstrated the ability of the PPAP app to use objective AM data to create daily, personalized physical activity guidance, provide interactive feedback to users, and enable remote administrative monitoring of data quality and subject compliance. Using this approach, public health professionals, clinicians, and researchers can adapt the PPAP app to facilitate a range of personalized physical activity interventions to improve health outcomes, assess injury risk, and achieve fitness performance goals in diverse populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus