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Development and Pilot Testing of the Eating4two Mobile Phone App to Monitor Gestational Weight Gain.

Knight-Agarwal C, Davis DL, Williams L, Davey R, Cox R, Clarke A - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2015)

Bottom Line: A mobile phone app has been proposed as a convenient and cost-effective alternative to face-to-face interventions.Participants found the Eating4Two app to be a motivational tool but would have liked scales or other markers on the graph that demonstrated exact weight gain.The Eating4Two app was viewed by participants in our study as an innovative support system to help motivate healthy behaviors during pregnancy and as a credible resource for accessing nutrition-focused information.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia. Cathy.Knight-Agarwal@canberra.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: The number of pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30kg/m(2) or more is increasing, which has important implications for antenatal care. Various resource-intensive interventions have attempted to assist women in managing their weight gain during pregnancy with limited success. A mobile phone app has been proposed as a convenient and cost-effective alternative to face-to-face interventions.

Objective: This paper describes the process of developing and pilot testing the Eating4Two app, which aims to provide women with a simple gestational weight gain (GWG) calculator, general dietary information, and the motivation to achieve a healthy weight gain during pregnancy.

Methods: The project involved the development of app components, including a graphing function that allows the user to record their weight throughout the pregnancy and to receive real-time feedback on weight gain progress and general information on antenatal nutrition. Stakeholder consultation was used to inform development. The app was pilot tested with 10 pregnant women using a mixed method approach via an online survey, 2 focus groups, and 1 individual interview.

Results: The Eating4Two app took 7 months to develop and evaluate. It involved several disciplines--including nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, public health, and information technology--at the University of Canberra. Participants found the Eating4Two app to be a motivational tool but would have liked scales or other markers on the graph that demonstrated exact weight gain. They also liked the nutrition information; however, many felt it should be formatted in a more user friendly way.

Conclusions: The Eating4Two app was viewed by participants in our study as an innovative support system to help motivate healthy behaviors during pregnancy and as a credible resource for accessing nutrition-focused information. The feedback provided by participants will assist with refining the current prototype for use in a clinical intervention trial.

No MeSH data available.


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Mentions: The overall content and usability for the Eating4Two app was shaped by qualitative investigation and supported by an evidence-based approach. The study team first met in August 2013 to discuss the project plan and an IT specialist was employed shortly after to write the software program for the app. It was decided that an Android 2.1 and higher platform be used as this was the most cost-effective choice [17]. The study team met on a weekly basis in order to resolve issues and review the progress of the project. A simple, visual graphing function that allows the user to configure their start BMI, estimate due date, and weigh in throughout the pregnancy and that provided real-time feedback was developed as part of the app. The opening screen of the app requires users to agree to the statement that the app does not replace the care and advice provided by a health professional. In order to progress to the app functions, the user must indicate that they agree with the statement. Alternatively, they are given the option to exit. Once the “I agree” tab has been pressed, users enter the configuration screen shown in Figure 1. Gestation (in weeks) is calculated by setting a date (usually provided by ultrasound), from first day of last menstrual period, or by current gestational week. The next step requires input of weight and height in either metric or imperial units. To appeal to a broad range of potential consumers, BMI is automatically calculated and appears on the screen (BMI is the division of weight in kilograms by height in meters squared). Once the “Save” tab has been pressed, the recommended GWG is calculated to align with Institute of Medicine guidelines based on BMI at conception. This function allows the user to check, at any time during their pregnancy, where they are positioned on the graph in terms of weight gain (see Figure 2). Numbers on the graph were purposely omitted to reduce weight-related stress as appropriate trends within each participant’s recommended weight gain range were felt to be more important than numbers aiming for an exact weight.


Development and Pilot Testing of the Eating4two Mobile Phone App to Monitor Gestational Weight Gain.

Knight-Agarwal C, Davis DL, Williams L, Davey R, Cox R, Clarke A - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2015)

Configuration screen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526903&req=5

figure1: Configuration screen.
Mentions: The overall content and usability for the Eating4Two app was shaped by qualitative investigation and supported by an evidence-based approach. The study team first met in August 2013 to discuss the project plan and an IT specialist was employed shortly after to write the software program for the app. It was decided that an Android 2.1 and higher platform be used as this was the most cost-effective choice [17]. The study team met on a weekly basis in order to resolve issues and review the progress of the project. A simple, visual graphing function that allows the user to configure their start BMI, estimate due date, and weigh in throughout the pregnancy and that provided real-time feedback was developed as part of the app. The opening screen of the app requires users to agree to the statement that the app does not replace the care and advice provided by a health professional. In order to progress to the app functions, the user must indicate that they agree with the statement. Alternatively, they are given the option to exit. Once the “I agree” tab has been pressed, users enter the configuration screen shown in Figure 1. Gestation (in weeks) is calculated by setting a date (usually provided by ultrasound), from first day of last menstrual period, or by current gestational week. The next step requires input of weight and height in either metric or imperial units. To appeal to a broad range of potential consumers, BMI is automatically calculated and appears on the screen (BMI is the division of weight in kilograms by height in meters squared). Once the “Save” tab has been pressed, the recommended GWG is calculated to align with Institute of Medicine guidelines based on BMI at conception. This function allows the user to check, at any time during their pregnancy, where they are positioned on the graph in terms of weight gain (see Figure 2). Numbers on the graph were purposely omitted to reduce weight-related stress as appropriate trends within each participant’s recommended weight gain range were felt to be more important than numbers aiming for an exact weight.

Bottom Line: A mobile phone app has been proposed as a convenient and cost-effective alternative to face-to-face interventions.Participants found the Eating4Two app to be a motivational tool but would have liked scales or other markers on the graph that demonstrated exact weight gain.The Eating4Two app was viewed by participants in our study as an innovative support system to help motivate healthy behaviors during pregnancy and as a credible resource for accessing nutrition-focused information.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia. Cathy.Knight-Agarwal@canberra.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: The number of pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30kg/m(2) or more is increasing, which has important implications for antenatal care. Various resource-intensive interventions have attempted to assist women in managing their weight gain during pregnancy with limited success. A mobile phone app has been proposed as a convenient and cost-effective alternative to face-to-face interventions.

Objective: This paper describes the process of developing and pilot testing the Eating4Two app, which aims to provide women with a simple gestational weight gain (GWG) calculator, general dietary information, and the motivation to achieve a healthy weight gain during pregnancy.

Methods: The project involved the development of app components, including a graphing function that allows the user to record their weight throughout the pregnancy and to receive real-time feedback on weight gain progress and general information on antenatal nutrition. Stakeholder consultation was used to inform development. The app was pilot tested with 10 pregnant women using a mixed method approach via an online survey, 2 focus groups, and 1 individual interview.

Results: The Eating4Two app took 7 months to develop and evaluate. It involved several disciplines--including nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, public health, and information technology--at the University of Canberra. Participants found the Eating4Two app to be a motivational tool but would have liked scales or other markers on the graph that demonstrated exact weight gain. They also liked the nutrition information; however, many felt it should be formatted in a more user friendly way.

Conclusions: The Eating4Two app was viewed by participants in our study as an innovative support system to help motivate healthy behaviors during pregnancy and as a credible resource for accessing nutrition-focused information. The feedback provided by participants will assist with refining the current prototype for use in a clinical intervention trial.

No MeSH data available.