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Delivering a "dose of hope": a faith-based program to increase older african americans' participation in clinical trials.

Frew PM, Omer SB, Parker K, Bolton M, Schamel J, Shapiro E, Owens L, Saint-Victor D, Boggavarapu S, Braxton N, Archibald M, Kalokhe AS, Horton T, Root CM, Fenimore VL, Anderson AM - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Bottom Line: Underrepresentation of older-age racial and ethnic minorities in clinical research is a significant barrier to health in the United States, as it impedes medical research advancement of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies.The objective of the study was to develop and test the feasibility of a community-developed faith-based intervention and evaluate its potential to increase the number of older African Americans in clinical research.Using a cluster-randomized design, we worked with six matched churches to enroll at least 210 persons.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emory University, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Decatur, GA, United States. pfrew@emory.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Underrepresentation of older-age racial and ethnic minorities in clinical research is a significant barrier to health in the United States, as it impedes medical research advancement of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies.

Objective: The objective of the study was to develop and test the feasibility of a community-developed faith-based intervention and evaluate its potential to increase the number of older African Americans in clinical research.

Methods: Using a cluster-randomized design, we worked with six matched churches to enroll at least 210 persons. We provided those in the intervention group churches with three educational sessions on the role of clinical trials in addressing health disparity topics, and those in the comparison group completed surveys at the same timepoints. All persons enrolled in the study received ongoing information via newsletters and direct outreach on an array of clinical studies seeking participants. We evaluated the short-, mid-, and longer-term effects of the interventional program on clinical trial-related outcomes (ie, screening and enrollment).

Results: From 2012 to 2013, we enrolled a balanced cohort of 221 persons in the program. At a 3-month follow-up, mean intention to seek information about clinical trials was higher than baseline in both treatment (mu=7.5/10; sigma=3.1) and control arms (mu=6.6/10; sigma=3.3), with the difference more pronounced in the treatment arm. The program demonstrated strong retention at 3-month (95.4%, 211/221) and 6-month timepoints (94.1%, 208/221).

Conclusions: The "Dose of Hope" program addressed an unmet need to reach an often overlooked audience of older African Americans who are members of churches and stimulate their interest in clinical trial participation. The program demonstrated its appeal in the delivery of effective messages and information about health disparities, and the role of clinical research in addressing these challenges.

No MeSH data available.


Delivering a "Dose of Hope” study design.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure1: Delivering a "Dose of Hope” study design.

Mentions: Using random selection, one church in each pair was allocated to the intervention condition (Intervention Group 1) and the matched pair was assigned to the control condition (Comparison Group 2). Figure 1 shows the study design.


Delivering a "dose of hope": a faith-based program to increase older african americans' participation in clinical trials.

Frew PM, Omer SB, Parker K, Bolton M, Schamel J, Shapiro E, Owens L, Saint-Victor D, Boggavarapu S, Braxton N, Archibald M, Kalokhe AS, Horton T, Root CM, Fenimore VL, Anderson AM - JMIR Res Protoc (2015)

Delivering a "Dose of Hope” study design.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526899&req=5

figure1: Delivering a "Dose of Hope” study design.
Mentions: Using random selection, one church in each pair was allocated to the intervention condition (Intervention Group 1) and the matched pair was assigned to the control condition (Comparison Group 2). Figure 1 shows the study design.

Bottom Line: Underrepresentation of older-age racial and ethnic minorities in clinical research is a significant barrier to health in the United States, as it impedes medical research advancement of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies.The objective of the study was to develop and test the feasibility of a community-developed faith-based intervention and evaluate its potential to increase the number of older African Americans in clinical research.Using a cluster-randomized design, we worked with six matched churches to enroll at least 210 persons.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emory University, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Decatur, GA, United States. pfrew@emory.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Underrepresentation of older-age racial and ethnic minorities in clinical research is a significant barrier to health in the United States, as it impedes medical research advancement of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies.

Objective: The objective of the study was to develop and test the feasibility of a community-developed faith-based intervention and evaluate its potential to increase the number of older African Americans in clinical research.

Methods: Using a cluster-randomized design, we worked with six matched churches to enroll at least 210 persons. We provided those in the intervention group churches with three educational sessions on the role of clinical trials in addressing health disparity topics, and those in the comparison group completed surveys at the same timepoints. All persons enrolled in the study received ongoing information via newsletters and direct outreach on an array of clinical studies seeking participants. We evaluated the short-, mid-, and longer-term effects of the interventional program on clinical trial-related outcomes (ie, screening and enrollment).

Results: From 2012 to 2013, we enrolled a balanced cohort of 221 persons in the program. At a 3-month follow-up, mean intention to seek information about clinical trials was higher than baseline in both treatment (mu=7.5/10; sigma=3.1) and control arms (mu=6.6/10; sigma=3.3), with the difference more pronounced in the treatment arm. The program demonstrated strong retention at 3-month (95.4%, 211/221) and 6-month timepoints (94.1%, 208/221).

Conclusions: The "Dose of Hope" program addressed an unmet need to reach an often overlooked audience of older African Americans who are members of churches and stimulate their interest in clinical trial participation. The program demonstrated its appeal in the delivery of effective messages and information about health disparities, and the role of clinical research in addressing these challenges.

No MeSH data available.