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3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate.

Gowers SA, Curto VF, Seneci CA, Wang C, Anastasova S, Vadgama P, Yang GZ, Boutelle MG - Anal. Chem. (2015)

Bottom Line: A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip.Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor.As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: §School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

No MeSH data available.


Typical calibration curves for 50 μm disc glucoseand lactatebiosensors in the microfluidic device at 1 μL/min. Mean ±standard deviation of measurement shown (n = 4).Points fitted with the Michaelis–Menten equation. Inset: Rawdata for a typical 5-point lactate calibration from 0 to 4 mM in 1mM steps.
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fig3: Typical calibration curves for 50 μm disc glucoseand lactatebiosensors in the microfluidic device at 1 μL/min. Mean ±standard deviation of measurement shown (n = 4).Points fitted with the Michaelis–Menten equation. Inset: Rawdata for a typical 5-point lactate calibration from 0 to 4 mM in 1mM steps.

Mentions: Metabolite levelsin tissue vary between people and depend on aperson’s metabolism and fitness during exercise, as well ason the particular tissue being sampled.40 The system was calibrated online from 0 to 10 mM, at 1 μL/minto verify that it is capable of detecting physiologically relevantconcentrations of glucose and lactate levels in the dialysate. Figure 3 shows typical current response vs concentrationfor the biosensors when placed in the microfluidic device. These dataindicate that the biosensing system has good sensitivity to glucoseand lactate, with clear current changes corresponding to increasinglevels of substrate. The biosensors show a good dynamic range, suitablefor physiological monitoring. The fact that sensitivities are similarfor the glucose and lactate sensors (Figure 3) reflects the mass-transport limiting effects of the PU membrane.


3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate.

Gowers SA, Curto VF, Seneci CA, Wang C, Anastasova S, Vadgama P, Yang GZ, Boutelle MG - Anal. Chem. (2015)

Typical calibration curves for 50 μm disc glucoseand lactatebiosensors in the microfluidic device at 1 μL/min. Mean ±standard deviation of measurement shown (n = 4).Points fitted with the Michaelis–Menten equation. Inset: Rawdata for a typical 5-point lactate calibration from 0 to 4 mM in 1mM steps.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526885&req=5

fig3: Typical calibration curves for 50 μm disc glucoseand lactatebiosensors in the microfluidic device at 1 μL/min. Mean ±standard deviation of measurement shown (n = 4).Points fitted with the Michaelis–Menten equation. Inset: Rawdata for a typical 5-point lactate calibration from 0 to 4 mM in 1mM steps.
Mentions: Metabolite levelsin tissue vary between people and depend on aperson’s metabolism and fitness during exercise, as well ason the particular tissue being sampled.40 The system was calibrated online from 0 to 10 mM, at 1 μL/minto verify that it is capable of detecting physiologically relevantconcentrations of glucose and lactate levels in the dialysate. Figure 3 shows typical current response vs concentrationfor the biosensors when placed in the microfluidic device. These dataindicate that the biosensing system has good sensitivity to glucoseand lactate, with clear current changes corresponding to increasinglevels of substrate. The biosensors show a good dynamic range, suitablefor physiological monitoring. The fact that sensitivities are similarfor the glucose and lactate sensors (Figure 3) reflects the mass-transport limiting effects of the PU membrane.

Bottom Line: A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip.Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor.As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: §School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

No MeSH data available.