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3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate.

Gowers SA, Curto VF, Seneci CA, Wang C, Anastasova S, Vadgama P, Yang GZ, Boutelle MG - Anal. Chem. (2015)

Bottom Line: A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip.Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor.As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: §School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

No MeSH data available.


A. Normalizedcurrent response of a 50 μm disc glucose (red)and lactate (green) biosensor in a stirred beaker to a 2 mM concentrationstep (purple arrow). B. The graph shows the normalized current fora glucose biosensor to a step change from 0 to 2 mM at 1 μL/minin three different microfluidic channels. The measured channel sizesare shown in the table inset. The response time increases as the channeldimension increases.
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fig2: A. Normalizedcurrent response of a 50 μm disc glucose (red)and lactate (green) biosensor in a stirred beaker to a 2 mM concentrationstep (purple arrow). B. The graph shows the normalized current fora glucose biosensor to a step change from 0 to 2 mM at 1 μL/minin three different microfluidic channels. The measured channel sizesare shown in the table inset. The response time increases as the channeldimension increases.

Mentions: To investigate the effectof the microfluidic channel dimensionson the response time of the sensors, three different channel sizeswere tested, as described in the Experimental Section. Figure 2-B shows the normalized currentresponse of a glucose biosensor to a step change from 0 to 2 mM at1 μL/min for the different channel sizes. In each case the sensorwas positioned in the middle of the channel. Cross sections of eachchannel were measured using a microscope to determine the actual dimensionsof each of the channels. The dimensions specified in the table inFigure 2-B refer to the measured dimensions.


3D Printed Microfluidic Device with Integrated Biosensors for Online Analysis of Subcutaneous Human Microdialysate.

Gowers SA, Curto VF, Seneci CA, Wang C, Anastasova S, Vadgama P, Yang GZ, Boutelle MG - Anal. Chem. (2015)

A. Normalizedcurrent response of a 50 μm disc glucose (red)and lactate (green) biosensor in a stirred beaker to a 2 mM concentrationstep (purple arrow). B. The graph shows the normalized current fora glucose biosensor to a step change from 0 to 2 mM at 1 μL/minin three different microfluidic channels. The measured channel sizesare shown in the table inset. The response time increases as the channeldimension increases.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526885&req=5

fig2: A. Normalizedcurrent response of a 50 μm disc glucose (red)and lactate (green) biosensor in a stirred beaker to a 2 mM concentrationstep (purple arrow). B. The graph shows the normalized current fora glucose biosensor to a step change from 0 to 2 mM at 1 μL/minin three different microfluidic channels. The measured channel sizesare shown in the table inset. The response time increases as the channeldimension increases.
Mentions: To investigate the effectof the microfluidic channel dimensionson the response time of the sensors, three different channel sizeswere tested, as described in the Experimental Section. Figure 2-B shows the normalized currentresponse of a glucose biosensor to a step change from 0 to 2 mM at1 μL/min for the different channel sizes. In each case the sensorwas positioned in the middle of the channel. Cross sections of eachchannel were measured using a microscope to determine the actual dimensionsof each of the channels. The dimensions specified in the table inFigure 2-B refer to the measured dimensions.

Bottom Line: A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip.Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor.As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: §School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This work presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a robust 3D printed microfluidic analysis system that integrates with FDA-approved clinical microdialysis probes for continuous monitoring of human tissue metabolite levels. The microfluidic device incorporates removable needle type integrated biosensors for glucose and lactate, which are optimized for high tissue concentrations, housed in novel 3D printed electrode holders. A soft compressible 3D printed elastomer at the base of the holder ensures a good seal with the microfluidic chip. Optimization of the channel size significantly improves the response time of the sensor. As a proof-of-concept study, our microfluidic device was coupled to lab-built wireless potentiostats and used to monitor real-time subcutaneous glucose and lactate levels in cyclists undergoing a training regime.

No MeSH data available.