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Improvements in dizziness and imbalance results from using a multi disciplinary and multi sensory approach to Vestibular Physical Therapy - a case study.

Gottshall KR, Sessoms PH - Front Syst Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: After 6 weeks of therapy, twice weekly, improvements in clinical vestibular measures were observed as well as walking speed and patient confidence.This case study provides supportive evidence that multidimensional tasking in a virtual environment provides a safe but demanding form of vestibular therapy for patients needing more challenging tasks than those provided with traditional therapy techniques.Those persons requiring higher levels of performance before returning to full duty (e.g., pilots, special operators, etc.) may find this type of therapy beneficial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physical Therapy Department, Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
This paper discusses a case study of a 41-year-old active duty male service member who sustained head trauma from a motorcycle accident and underwent multidisciplinary vestibular physical therapy rehabilitation. He was initially treated with traditional physical therapy applications of treadmill walking and standing balance with some symptom improvements, but was not able to maintain a running speed that would allow him to return to full active duty status. Further treatment utilizing a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment was performed in order to increase level of difficulty and further enhance function. This treatment is able to elicit vestibular deficits seen in the community as it requires subjects to walk and balance while performing tasks within a virtual scenario incorporating platform motion, visual surround and flow, and cognitive processing. After 6 weeks of therapy, twice weekly, improvements in clinical vestibular measures were observed as well as walking speed and patient confidence. The patient was able to return to full duty after treatment. This case study provides supportive evidence that multidimensional tasking in a virtual environment provides a safe but demanding form of vestibular therapy for patients needing more challenging tasks than those provided with traditional therapy techniques. Those persons requiring higher levels of performance before returning to full duty (e.g., pilots, special operators, etc.) may find this type of therapy beneficial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient becoming unstable when difficulty (amount of platform motion) in the application increases. By the end of 6 weeks of treatment, subject was able to perform all applications without instability.
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Figure 2: Patient becoming unstable when difficulty (amount of platform motion) in the application increases. By the end of 6 weeks of treatment, subject was able to perform all applications without instability.

Mentions: During the Boat application, the patient continually improved his score from session to session, due most likely to the increased platform motion at each session and his ability to maintain a higher average speed each time. The patient initially displayed some balance difficulties (Figure 2) throughout the sessions as platform motion and his average speed increased, but did not show any problems with balance by Visit 5.


Improvements in dizziness and imbalance results from using a multi disciplinary and multi sensory approach to Vestibular Physical Therapy - a case study.

Gottshall KR, Sessoms PH - Front Syst Neurosci (2015)

Patient becoming unstable when difficulty (amount of platform motion) in the application increases. By the end of 6 weeks of treatment, subject was able to perform all applications without instability.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526811&req=5

Figure 2: Patient becoming unstable when difficulty (amount of platform motion) in the application increases. By the end of 6 weeks of treatment, subject was able to perform all applications without instability.
Mentions: During the Boat application, the patient continually improved his score from session to session, due most likely to the increased platform motion at each session and his ability to maintain a higher average speed each time. The patient initially displayed some balance difficulties (Figure 2) throughout the sessions as platform motion and his average speed increased, but did not show any problems with balance by Visit 5.

Bottom Line: After 6 weeks of therapy, twice weekly, improvements in clinical vestibular measures were observed as well as walking speed and patient confidence.This case study provides supportive evidence that multidimensional tasking in a virtual environment provides a safe but demanding form of vestibular therapy for patients needing more challenging tasks than those provided with traditional therapy techniques.Those persons requiring higher levels of performance before returning to full duty (e.g., pilots, special operators, etc.) may find this type of therapy beneficial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physical Therapy Department, Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
This paper discusses a case study of a 41-year-old active duty male service member who sustained head trauma from a motorcycle accident and underwent multidisciplinary vestibular physical therapy rehabilitation. He was initially treated with traditional physical therapy applications of treadmill walking and standing balance with some symptom improvements, but was not able to maintain a running speed that would allow him to return to full active duty status. Further treatment utilizing a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment was performed in order to increase level of difficulty and further enhance function. This treatment is able to elicit vestibular deficits seen in the community as it requires subjects to walk and balance while performing tasks within a virtual scenario incorporating platform motion, visual surround and flow, and cognitive processing. After 6 weeks of therapy, twice weekly, improvements in clinical vestibular measures were observed as well as walking speed and patient confidence. The patient was able to return to full duty after treatment. This case study provides supportive evidence that multidimensional tasking in a virtual environment provides a safe but demanding form of vestibular therapy for patients needing more challenging tasks than those provided with traditional therapy techniques. Those persons requiring higher levels of performance before returning to full duty (e.g., pilots, special operators, etc.) may find this type of therapy beneficial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus