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Occupational coping self-efficacy explains distress and well-being in nurses beyond psychosocial job characteristics.

Pisanti R, van der Doef M, Maes S, Lombardo C, Lazzari D, Violani C - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Cross-sectional survey.Beyond the main effects, no significant interactive effects of demands, control, and support were found.Limitations of the study and practical implications are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, "Niccolò Cusano" University of Rome Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Aim: The main purpose of the present study was to extend the Job Demand Control Support (JDCS) model analyzing the direct and interactive role of occupational coping self-efficacy (OCSE) beliefs.

Background: OCSE refers to an individual's beliefs about their ability to cope with occupational stressors. The interplay between occupational stressors, job resources, and self-efficacy beliefs is poorly investigated. The present research attempts to address this gap.

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Method: Questionnaire data from 1479 nurses (65% response) were analyzed. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the direct and moderating role of OCSE in conjunction with job demands (i.e., time pressure), and two job resources: job control (i.e., decision latitude and skill discretion) and social support (i.e., supervisor support and coworker support) in predicting psychological distress and well-being.

Results: Our findings indicated that high demands, low job control, and low social support additively predicted the distress/well-being outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, psychological distress, and somatic complaints). Beyond the main effects, no significant interactive effects of demands, control, and support were found. OCSE accounted for an additional 1-4% of the variance in the outcomes, after controlling for the JDCS variables. In addition, the results indicate that OCSE buffers the association between low job control and the distress dimensions emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and psychological distress. Low control was detrimental only for nurses with low OCSE.

Conclusion: Our results suggest expanding the JDCS model incorporating individual characteristics such as OCSE beliefs, for predicting psychological distress and well-being. Limitations of the study and practical implications are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Job control X OCSE, predicting psychological distress.
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Figure 3: Job control X OCSE, predicting psychological distress.

Mentions: As described in Table 2, the regression analyses yielded significant two way interactions between OCSE and job control in predicting emotional exhaustion (B = 0.15, p < 0.001), depersonalization (B = 0.08, p < 0.01), and psychological distress (B = 0.07, p < 0.01). The interactions accounted for 2% of the additional variance in the case of emotional exhaustion; and 1% in the other instances. As depicted in the Figures 1–3, the nature of the interaction is similar. Simple slopes analysis (Dawson and Richter, 2006) indicated that (low) control had the strongest influence on emotional exhaustion when perceived OCSE was low (B = -0.24, p < 0.001). The slope for high OCSE was not significant (B = 0.02, p > 0.10). Similar results were obtained for depersonalization (slope for low OCSE: B = -0.16, p < 0.001; slope for high OCSE: B = -0.04, p > 0.10); and psychological distress (slope for low OCSE: B = -0.12, p < 0.001; slope for high OCSE: B = 0.01, p > 0.10).


Occupational coping self-efficacy explains distress and well-being in nurses beyond psychosocial job characteristics.

Pisanti R, van der Doef M, Maes S, Lombardo C, Lazzari D, Violani C - Front Psychol (2015)

Job control X OCSE, predicting psychological distress.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526791&req=5

Figure 3: Job control X OCSE, predicting psychological distress.
Mentions: As described in Table 2, the regression analyses yielded significant two way interactions between OCSE and job control in predicting emotional exhaustion (B = 0.15, p < 0.001), depersonalization (B = 0.08, p < 0.01), and psychological distress (B = 0.07, p < 0.01). The interactions accounted for 2% of the additional variance in the case of emotional exhaustion; and 1% in the other instances. As depicted in the Figures 1–3, the nature of the interaction is similar. Simple slopes analysis (Dawson and Richter, 2006) indicated that (low) control had the strongest influence on emotional exhaustion when perceived OCSE was low (B = -0.24, p < 0.001). The slope for high OCSE was not significant (B = 0.02, p > 0.10). Similar results were obtained for depersonalization (slope for low OCSE: B = -0.16, p < 0.001; slope for high OCSE: B = -0.04, p > 0.10); and psychological distress (slope for low OCSE: B = -0.12, p < 0.001; slope for high OCSE: B = 0.01, p > 0.10).

Bottom Line: Cross-sectional survey.Beyond the main effects, no significant interactive effects of demands, control, and support were found.Limitations of the study and practical implications are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, "Niccolò Cusano" University of Rome Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Aim: The main purpose of the present study was to extend the Job Demand Control Support (JDCS) model analyzing the direct and interactive role of occupational coping self-efficacy (OCSE) beliefs.

Background: OCSE refers to an individual's beliefs about their ability to cope with occupational stressors. The interplay between occupational stressors, job resources, and self-efficacy beliefs is poorly investigated. The present research attempts to address this gap.

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Method: Questionnaire data from 1479 nurses (65% response) were analyzed. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the direct and moderating role of OCSE in conjunction with job demands (i.e., time pressure), and two job resources: job control (i.e., decision latitude and skill discretion) and social support (i.e., supervisor support and coworker support) in predicting psychological distress and well-being.

Results: Our findings indicated that high demands, low job control, and low social support additively predicted the distress/well-being outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, psychological distress, and somatic complaints). Beyond the main effects, no significant interactive effects of demands, control, and support were found. OCSE accounted for an additional 1-4% of the variance in the outcomes, after controlling for the JDCS variables. In addition, the results indicate that OCSE buffers the association between low job control and the distress dimensions emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and psychological distress. Low control was detrimental only for nurses with low OCSE.

Conclusion: Our results suggest expanding the JDCS model incorporating individual characteristics such as OCSE beliefs, for predicting psychological distress and well-being. Limitations of the study and practical implications are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus