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Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation is associated with computer-based auditory training uptake, engagement, and adherence for people with hearing loss.

Henshaw H, McCormack A, Ferguson MA - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants found the CBAT intervention easy to use, interesting and enjoyable.Perceived post-training benefits included better concentration and attention leading to improved listening.We see this as an important first-step for informing future theory-driven development of effective CBAT interventions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Otology and Hearing Group, National Institute for Health Research Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham Nottingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Hearing aid intervention typically occurs after significant delay, or not at all, resulting in an unmet need for many people with hearing loss. Computer-based auditory training (CBAT) may provide generalized benefits to real-world listening, particularly in adverse listening conditions, and can be conveniently delivered in the home environment. Yet as with any intervention, adherence to CBAT is critical to its success. The main aim of this investigation was to explore motivations for uptake, engagement and adherence with home-delivered CBAT in a randomized controlled trial of adults with mild sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), with a view to informing future CBAT development. A secondary aim examined perceived benefits of CBAT. Participants (n = 44, 50-74 years olds with mild SNHL who did not have hearing aids) completed a 4-week program of phoneme discrimination CBAT at home. Participants' experiences of CBAT were captured using a post-training questionnaire (n = 44) and two focus groups (n = 5 per group). A mixed-methods approach examined participants' experiences with the intervention, the usability and desirability of the CBAT software, and participants' motivations for CBAT uptake, engagement and adherence. Self-Determination Theory (SDT) was used as a theoretical framework for the interpretation of results. Participants found the CBAT intervention easy to use, interesting and enjoyable. Initial participation in the study was associated with extrinsic motivation (e.g., hearing difficulties). Engagement and adherence with CBAT was influenced by intrinsic (e.g., a desire to achieve higher scores), and extrinsic (e.g., to help others with hearing loss) motivations. Perceived post-training benefits included better concentration and attention leading to improved listening. CBAT also prompted further help-seeking behaviors for some individuals. We see this as an important first-step for informing future theory-driven development of effective CBAT interventions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Word cloud to show participantŠs top five word choices describing their experience with the auditory training software.
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Figure 2: Word cloud to show participantŠs top five word choices describing their experience with the auditory training software.

Mentions: Frequency of selection for participants' top five prioritized descriptor words to describe their experience with the auditory training software is illustrated in a word cloud (Figure 2), where words with the greatest frequency of selection appear larger and darker than those words that were less frequently selected. “Easy to use” (intrinsic motivation) was by far the most frequently selected by participants as one of the top-five descriptors to explain their experiences with the CBAT software (28/44 participants, 63.6%). Other frequently prioritized words, selected by at least a quarter of all participants, included Straightforward (intrinsic; n = 15, 34.1%), Valuable (extrinsic; n = 14, 31.8%), Rewarding (extrinsic; n = 13, 29.5%), Motivating (extrinsic; n = 12, 27.3%) and Useful (extrinsic; n = 11, 25.0%).


Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation is associated with computer-based auditory training uptake, engagement, and adherence for people with hearing loss.

Henshaw H, McCormack A, Ferguson MA - Front Psychol (2015)

Word cloud to show participantŠs top five word choices describing their experience with the auditory training software.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526789&req=5

Figure 2: Word cloud to show participantŠs top five word choices describing their experience with the auditory training software.
Mentions: Frequency of selection for participants' top five prioritized descriptor words to describe their experience with the auditory training software is illustrated in a word cloud (Figure 2), where words with the greatest frequency of selection appear larger and darker than those words that were less frequently selected. “Easy to use” (intrinsic motivation) was by far the most frequently selected by participants as one of the top-five descriptors to explain their experiences with the CBAT software (28/44 participants, 63.6%). Other frequently prioritized words, selected by at least a quarter of all participants, included Straightforward (intrinsic; n = 15, 34.1%), Valuable (extrinsic; n = 14, 31.8%), Rewarding (extrinsic; n = 13, 29.5%), Motivating (extrinsic; n = 12, 27.3%) and Useful (extrinsic; n = 11, 25.0%).

Bottom Line: Participants found the CBAT intervention easy to use, interesting and enjoyable.Perceived post-training benefits included better concentration and attention leading to improved listening.We see this as an important first-step for informing future theory-driven development of effective CBAT interventions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Otology and Hearing Group, National Institute for Health Research Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham Nottingham, UK.

ABSTRACT
Hearing aid intervention typically occurs after significant delay, or not at all, resulting in an unmet need for many people with hearing loss. Computer-based auditory training (CBAT) may provide generalized benefits to real-world listening, particularly in adverse listening conditions, and can be conveniently delivered in the home environment. Yet as with any intervention, adherence to CBAT is critical to its success. The main aim of this investigation was to explore motivations for uptake, engagement and adherence with home-delivered CBAT in a randomized controlled trial of adults with mild sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), with a view to informing future CBAT development. A secondary aim examined perceived benefits of CBAT. Participants (n = 44, 50-74 years olds with mild SNHL who did not have hearing aids) completed a 4-week program of phoneme discrimination CBAT at home. Participants' experiences of CBAT were captured using a post-training questionnaire (n = 44) and two focus groups (n = 5 per group). A mixed-methods approach examined participants' experiences with the intervention, the usability and desirability of the CBAT software, and participants' motivations for CBAT uptake, engagement and adherence. Self-Determination Theory (SDT) was used as a theoretical framework for the interpretation of results. Participants found the CBAT intervention easy to use, interesting and enjoyable. Initial participation in the study was associated with extrinsic motivation (e.g., hearing difficulties). Engagement and adherence with CBAT was influenced by intrinsic (e.g., a desire to achieve higher scores), and extrinsic (e.g., to help others with hearing loss) motivations. Perceived post-training benefits included better concentration and attention leading to improved listening. CBAT also prompted further help-seeking behaviors for some individuals. We see this as an important first-step for informing future theory-driven development of effective CBAT interventions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus