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Introduced birds incompletely replace seed dispersal by a native frugivore.

Pejchar L - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Seed rain was significantly greater and more species rich at sites with Omao.These findings suggest that patterns of seed dispersal are altered following the local extinction of a native island frugivore.In an era of widespread extinction and invasion of island ecosystems, understanding the consequences of novel animal assemblages for processes like seed dispersal will be critical for maintaining diverse and self-regenerating plant communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA liba.pejchar@colostate.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean density (birds/ha) of frugivorous bird species at sites with and without Omao.
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PLV072F3: Mean density (birds/ha) of frugivorous bird species at sites with and without Omao.

Mentions: The density (birds/ha) of introduced frugivores was significantly higher at sites without Omao (sites with Omao = 3.1 ± 0.1; sites without Omao = 4.4 ± 0.8; t = −0.3; df = 2; P = 0.05), but overall density of frugivores, and density of individual frugivores did not differ between sites with and without Omao [see Supporting Information]. On average, Omao consisted of 46 % of the frugivorous bird population at sites with Omao. At these sites, Japanese white-eyes were 35 %, and Red-billed Leiothrix were 19 % of all frugivorous birds. At sites without Omao, Japanese White-eye were 56 % and Red-billed Leiothrix were 44 % of the frugivorous bird population. The absence of Omao from a site was thus associated with a 1.6× increase in Japanese White-eye and a 2.3× increase in Red-billed Leiothrix (Fig. 3).Figure 3.


Introduced birds incompletely replace seed dispersal by a native frugivore.

Pejchar L - AoB Plants (2015)

Mean density (birds/ha) of frugivorous bird species at sites with and without Omao.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4526755&req=5

PLV072F3: Mean density (birds/ha) of frugivorous bird species at sites with and without Omao.
Mentions: The density (birds/ha) of introduced frugivores was significantly higher at sites without Omao (sites with Omao = 3.1 ± 0.1; sites without Omao = 4.4 ± 0.8; t = −0.3; df = 2; P = 0.05), but overall density of frugivores, and density of individual frugivores did not differ between sites with and without Omao [see Supporting Information]. On average, Omao consisted of 46 % of the frugivorous bird population at sites with Omao. At these sites, Japanese white-eyes were 35 %, and Red-billed Leiothrix were 19 % of all frugivorous birds. At sites without Omao, Japanese White-eye were 56 % and Red-billed Leiothrix were 44 % of the frugivorous bird population. The absence of Omao from a site was thus associated with a 1.6× increase in Japanese White-eye and a 2.3× increase in Red-billed Leiothrix (Fig. 3).Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Seed rain was significantly greater and more species rich at sites with Omao.These findings suggest that patterns of seed dispersal are altered following the local extinction of a native island frugivore.In an era of widespread extinction and invasion of island ecosystems, understanding the consequences of novel animal assemblages for processes like seed dispersal will be critical for maintaining diverse and self-regenerating plant communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA liba.pejchar@colostate.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus